1928 Model T Coupe

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: 1928 Model T Coupe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 04:53 am:

Nothing like an accurate description when selling!

https://www.mecum.com/lots/GA0418-323140/1928-ford-model-t-coupe/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 07:29 am:

Kevin,

That is "Self Service", if I've ever seen it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 07:37 am:

But, but, but it may have been owned by a Doctor which makes it even more rare! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 08:41 am:

I know almost as much about the tractors as they do about Fords. This group has little patience with inaccuracy and that's the way it should be.
Rcih


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 09:10 am:

I started not to look at the description but after taking a look it's a shame the auction house didn't do their homework on this one.
As Linus would say, GOOD GRIEF CHARLIE BROWN!! and then some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:04 am:

Upon further research this is 1928 Model T. The engine is an A series first production Model A engine, the body is from the Model T Ford Piquette Avenue Plant. Rather than recycle the metal used to produce the body parts, management decided that it best to construct a Coupe for a Dr. Moreau . But the only parts available were the roadster. To satisfy the documentation that it was a Coupe a sales order with the words Coupe was found and it was attached to the build order and shipping invoice.

As it was 1928, and the Dr was a new Model T Owner, it would take time for him to know that a Model T was a unique vehicle. The car is not what it seems.

This group is so critical to what constitutes a Model T and a Coupe, especially a doctor's coupe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:25 am:

We're even critical about what constitutes a doctor !! ; )

A look at that site was worth it for the picture of the weird orange tractor/car ! I'd like to know more about that ! Too funny !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:30 am:

A second look found the 1910 IHC Roadster with air cooled overhead valve engine. That was worth it to me. The 17 Case was fun to see too.
Thanks for the link.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:47 am:

1938 Minneapolis Moline UDLX Comfortractor

A true Universal Car. Or what Henry could have done.

The UDLX was introduced in 1938 and dubbed the Comfortractor. It was designed as a solution for multiple problems. The farmer could work in the fields all week, then drive to town in comfort on the weekends. The UDLX was equipped with all the modern amenities - a fully enclosed, heated cabin with windows that open, cigarette lighter, a second seat for your tractor dog during the week, or the little lady on the weekend. You get a glove box, rear opening door, full raft of gauges, and slick coupe-like styling well, as close as a tractor can get to a sedan. The top speed of this beast was rated at 45 mph so a bit slow, but definitely usable on rural roads. The problem with the whole equation was cost and timing. The nation was still a bit in the doldrums at the end of the Great Depression, war was looming on the horizon, and the price tag for the fancy tractor was steep at $2,150. Those factors in concert all led to a production of only about 150 of the old tractors.

https://jalopnik.com/359170/1938-minneapolis-moline-udlx-the-gentlemans-tractor


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 10:48 am:

Richard Eagle:

If you are ever in Minneapolis, you can take a look at my dad's 1910 IHC Model F Roadster.

It's a "Hemi."

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 11:24 am:

Thanks Erik. The rocker arms and valve springs with the overhead cam make delightful pictures. With all the high wheelers I had missed the beauty and charm of the IHC cars with more conventional tires. What a pleasure that one must be.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 11:33 am:

Another reason for the MM UDLX lack of sales may have been the attitude of farmers who considered an enclosed tractor a sissy product.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 11:48 am:

Richard:

Very few people are aware that IHC built passenger cars for two years (1910 and 1911). My dad has owned the above car since 1951. Only 418 Model F roadsters were built in 1910 and 1911 - my dad's was the thirtieth one built. Very few survive today in various stages of completion.

In addition to the Model F roadster, IHC built a 1911 Model G roadster (identical to Model F except it had high wheel, hard rubber tires - the Henry Ford museum has a 1911 Model G roadster in its collection), a 1911 Model K roadster (same as Model F but with water jackets on the motor) and a 1911 J-30, water cooled touring.

The J-30 touring was the best designed of the cars above. If I recall correctly, 1105 were built - many survive today. They had a completely different motor from the roadsters.

You can see the motor of a 1911 Model K roadster running here - looks and sounds just like my dad's car even though it is water cooled (it's a 1911 although the video identifies it at a 1910):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WbSVhsx_h4

Here is a photo of the same 1911 Model K in the video - I took it at the "Red Power Roundup" (national meet for the National International Harvester Collectors Club) in Des Moines last year. It is in the process of being re-restored.


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(Message edited by Erik_johnson on March 07, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 01:08 pm:

-Guys-
We all know it's an established fact that ALL Model T's are 1923's......:-)

Take Care; Behave; Stay Warm (and)
"Happy T-ing!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 01:56 pm:

Erik, Cool video. It sounds like the proverbial sewing machine. I'll stay clear of that flywheel.
Thanks for sharing that.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 02:09 pm:

On the water cooled roadster, the fan is on the flywheel as you have noticed.

On the air cooled roadsters, there are two small brass fans on the left side of the motor (the air cooled high wheelers use similar fans). They are driven via a friction drive on the flywheel.

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