Connecting rods

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Connecting rods
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 08:52 pm:

How many of you used the original connecting rods that were in the engine when you rebuilt your engines. Ive heard the new rods are thinner and lighter, but im trying to keep some original parts in the engine. Doug


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert - Granby ,CT on Wednesday, March 07, 2018 - 08:54 pm:

I use the 20-27 light rods the idea is less rotating mass and a little less stress on the crank shaft


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 10:50 am:

Doug,

Do you mean brand new rods, or the later style, Model T era rods, known as "light rods"? Most people use old, refurbished rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 10:59 am:

The new rods come in two styles, babbitted and with inserts. If you don't have a set of the later lite original rods, buying the rods, paying for babbitting, shipping two ways, the cost works out close on getting the new rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 11:05 am:

Do the new rods with inserts require the engine to have ann oil pump to provide more oil for the insert. Cheers, John in Nova Scotia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 12:25 pm:

John, my OP is, babbitt is more forgiving of partials in unfiltered oil compared to inserts, rather then a matter of how much oil getting to them. You will still have the same oil surface between the crank and babbitt splash or pump. Inserts only have a very thin layer of babbitt on the shell which works fine in a car with a filter. With babbitt you take up the rods, inserts you replace when they wear out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Eaton on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 03:26 pm:

Thanks Mark, I feel the same way + I feel the inserts need more pressure to maintain the oil surface in the space between crank and bearing to prevent the natural wear. Maybe not expressed well butI know what I mean. Cheers John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 06:47 pm:

Jerry I meant brand new ones, I didnt realize that 20 thru 27 rods were light rods. My engine is a 1920 would it then have the lighter rods? Do you know exactly when they switched to the light ones


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 07:53 pm:

What is installed in YOUR engine, with out looking no way to tell. A lot can happen 98 years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Thursday, March 08, 2018 - 08:30 pm:

Good point Mark


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Friday, March 09, 2018 - 01:59 pm:

My understanding is the inserts for the new rods were designed for splash lube. The bearing material is more like babbitt than inserts designed for modern engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 12:24 am:

3024FSTD brand new rods with insert bearings:
.....
.....
PLEASE NOTE: These insert bearing connecting rods are designed to be used in cars with machined crankshaft and an oil pump for full oil pressure and a filter to remove impurities in the oil.
:-)
https://www.modeltford.com/item/3024FSTD.aspx
I was all fired up about these rods, thought I had missed their mention and then read the "PLEASE NOTE":
Aww poop.

(Message edited by duey_c on March 10, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 02:04 pm:

Ford made three different rods: early (heavy), lightweight (late), and medium weight (in between). Some sellers of rebabbited rods won't even accept the heavy and medium weight rods as cores.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Royster on Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 05:24 pm:

I checked the rods for being straight and had them rebabbited. Many miles later all good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 12:05 am:

Doug,

These are from Snyder. They work without an oil pump. I used them a few times in rebuild engines with no problem. Once I had to make the rods fit a crankshaft undersize between 0.02 and 0.03 no problem.
http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/forged-connecting-rod
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 07:22 am:

Andre,

Those must have been the ones I was remembering.

Neil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 07:07 pm:

I really have to believe that the Lang's & Snyders offerings are the exact same thing. Can't imagine there's 2 suppliers of these. I think maybe Lang's chooses to err on the side of caution in their suggestion to use these with an oil pump and oil filter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 07:41 pm:

I agree Jerry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 08:04 pm:

I know a filter is a great thing but think of all the engine designs over the years with shell bearings that didn't bother and got 100,000 miles up. VW beetle is one that comes to mind. In Australia, our first built GM car, the Holden, a small 6 copy of the 6 chev, shell bearings and no oil filter from 1948 to 1963. Change the oil every 3000 miles and well known to have the reputation of high mileage and no speed limits back in those days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 08:48 pm:

The rods are in fact identical. You can see in the pictures on Lang's and Snyder's websites, that both are marked "GTP-CR"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Sunday, March 11, 2018 - 09:51 pm:

I read through the data sheets on new rods from Synder's. They certainly look nice and make installation much simpler. I notice they have “dippers” for splash lubrication and make no mention of needing an oil pressure system in any of the three data sheets. :-)


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