What car uses ADLAKE Lamps

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: What car uses ADLAKE Lamps
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 01:14 pm:

More stuff from Dads collection Rear lamp made by Adlake and I think right hand the blue lens to the right purple to the left question what car would this be used on. Thanks Colin thinning the pile in Canada


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 01:28 pm:

Trucks used Adlake lamps but I believe what you have there is actually a railroad marker for a train car. Being that it is nickel plated, probably a passenger train car.

I presume it is electric.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 01:33 pm:

"Coach marker" might be a better term if it was used on a passenger car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 01:36 pm:

Yes it is electric and looks correct Its bin sitting on a shelf since the 1960s Thank you for the info We have a train museum here I will make a donation. Cheers Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 01:41 pm:

Note that I believe that it is a coach marker but not 100% sure. One of your friends at the railroad museum would be able to tell you for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 05:59 pm:

I think a lot of brass era higher class cars used Adlakes; Cadillac comes to mind, although I could be wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, March 17, 2018 - 06:41 pm:

Maybe it is an automobile tail lamp.

Who knows?

Suggest posting some photos on the HCCA forum.

The Adlake lamps I have seen over the years are painted black and more low brow and utilitarian in design. Not like the nice nickel plated example shown.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 12:47 am:

Those are definitely railroad "marker lamps" for a caboose. They have been chrome plated and even tho' that tends to lower their value as a railroad "collectable", they are beautiful. It might be noted that like these two, they always have red and blue lenses. Very often, such railroad marker lamps are electrified for display, however, they usually look strange to me because of the blue lenses. Most people that "electrify" them use a standard electric household type light bulb in them, which is WRONG! Think about it, caboose marker lamps like these, and also, the very similar railroad switch lamps were illuminated with a kerosene burner, which produces a yellow flame. Any really sharp little 2nd or 3rd grade child will tell you that yellow and blue makes GREEN. All you have to do to make such railroad lamps look PROPER with red and GREEN lenses when electrically illuminated is to put a YELLOW bulb in them, as yellow and blue makes GREEN. For what it's worth,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 01:20 am:

Well, maybe one more bit of railroad "trivia" and then I'll shut up!

The reason for caboose marker lamps showing red and green:

Marker lamps on a caboose at the rear of a train would show red when viewed from the head end train crew on a second train approaching from the rear. Very similar to the purpose of tail lights on an automobile. However, when a train displaying red to the rear was off of the mainline and "in the clear" on a siding, one of the trainmen in the caboose would turn the marker lamps 90 degrees so that they would then display green to the rear. The main reason for that is that at night, it can be difficult for an approaching train crew to determine if the train ahead in "in the clear" in the siding, is still on the mainline. The color of the marker lamps on the caboose removes all doubt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 01:59 am:

Sorry,....said I'd shut up, but one more thing, I did say "caboose" and others mentioned possibly marker lights for railroad passenger coach. That's probably correct as the marker lamps pictured certainly are beautiful, and a bit more "fancy" than than the railroad markers I'm familiar with for freight train cabooses. At any rate, they are definitely railroad marker lamps of some kind. O.K., now, as promised, I'll "shut up"!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Murray on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 09:35 am:

Blue flags and lamps are used to mark rail cars that are being serviced, and indicate that men are working on, under, or around the car...blue flagged cars are not to be coupled to or moved. Tracks under repair are also blue flagged, indicating to the train crews that the track is out of service because there there are track workers in harm's way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 11:48 am:

There are other examples of that "non-sweating" lamp on the internet that are also nickel plated and appear to be electric from the factory with automotive style sockets that are similar to what you see on Model T headlamps and other automobile lamps from the 1910s and 1920s.

My feeling is that it was nickel plated and electric from the factory.

If Colin posted more photos of the exterior as well as the interior of the lamp, you could better see the socket that sits below the bracket. Also, there should be more writing stamped on the bottom of the lamp.

I have circled the socket below:

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 12:32 pm:

a lot of trucks used adlake lamps, my f.w.d. has them. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 12:37 pm:

here is three more the ad on electric bulb has been installed nicely, I have a brass tail lamp it looks like they used a can opener. looks like maybe just a candle. Cheers Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

Well! Guess that'll teach me, huh? I can tell you that most railroad caboose marker lamps and switch lamps were made by Adlake, and apparently (obviously unknown to me) they must have made lamps for automobiles as well. I suppose it stands to reason that automotive lamps and railroad lamps made by the same company would look very much alike. If that's the case, I've sure never heard of that type of lamp (especially Adlake) being used on automobiles! Hmmm,...."live & learn", right? Anyway, beautiful lamps and nice photos too Colin. As far as the lamp(s) being stamped "NON-SWEATING BALANCED DRAFT" I still wonder about "electric from the factory"???

"Egg on my face" I guess, but this has certainly become an interesting post to me,......thanks,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 01:53 pm:

They did manufacture lamps for cars and trucks but I have always considered their oil lamps to be low end for cars. They also manufactured an electric lighting and starting system for automobiles.

Most of the Adlake lamps I have seen over the years have been the very utilitarian, black enameled kerosene truck side lamps and the small, nickel plated self generating acetylene lamps used on bicycles and some very early cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, March 18, 2018 - 02:10 pm:

WOW! More egg on my face! Just did some research via Google and the internet and found out more about what Erik Johnson and others have been talking about. Adams & Westlake (ADLAKE) has been in business since 1857 and besides the well known railroad equipment, they have made, and are still making all kinds of stuff, including lanterns for all kinds of purposes besides railroad. They've also made lanterns for automobiles and even bicycles. On Facebook, I see where they are presently making specialty items for restorers of all kinds as well. Makes me wonder if maybe Adams & Westlake could be a great source of help to the Model T community. Seems like they can (and will) make just about anything out of metal,......FWIW,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Grisbee---Cheyenne Wyo on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 09:58 pm:

I know that Hupmobile used Adlake lamps very similar to that one,some even had Hupmobile embossed in the top instead of Adlake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 11:29 pm:

Click on this link to see a few Hupmobile Adlake sidelamps:

https://www.google.com/search?q=hupmobile+adlake&client=safari&rls=en&source=lnm s&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjDkNC1vPzZAhVC5YMKHTsyBqcQ_AUICygC&biw=1216&bih=686#i mgrc=_


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