Wooden Gas Gauge

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Wooden Gas Gauge
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 12:48 pm:

I was at an antique shop yesterday and saw a Ford dealer issued wooden gas gauge. I donít know much about them and before I pay the $18, I would like to know more about it. It is capable of measuring 4 different tanks. There are two 9 gallon on one side and on the other there is a 10 gallon and 15 gallon. There are measures for a round tank, oval and square tanks. Does anyone know what year or years this gauge is from?
I have a 1923 with an oval tank and would prefer to buy one from this year.

Thanks,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 12:51 pm:

Willis,

They are not year specific. Looks like, since that one covers every possible variation of tank style, it could have been made anywhere between 1927 & yesterday.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 12:57 pm:

According to the encyclopedia, the oval gas tank first appeared in the 1920 model year, so the stick is 1920 or newer.

http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/F-H.htm#ft1

Just scanning similar sticks on Ebay, your $18.00 price seems like a bargain.

Others may know of a cheaper source. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:09 pm:

My Betsy came to me with a bag of OEM Ford tools, but not an oil can or gas stick, so I had to buy those.

Here are pictures of my gas stick, I don't remember when or where I bought it or how much I paid for it. It is marked for a Ford round tank, an oval tank, and a square tank. It is also marked with a 12 inch ruler for use on other brands of cars.

I use it nearly every time I put gas in the car. :-)


pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:10 pm:

I found one in my car when I got it from Smith & Jones auto parts and one from western auto. Unless you just want it for display go to home depot get a free paint stirring stick put gas in 1 gal at a time and make your own (Stir sticks are free)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Bourgeois on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:16 pm:

IMO $18 for a stick is about $17.50 too much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:17 pm:

This thread has the marking measurements for an oval and other tanks if you don't want to do the 1 gallon at a time method. :-)


http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/246150.html?1321031274


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By doug turner on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:32 pm:

I looked in my MAC'S catalog and they are $1.50. This catalog is 4 years old so they may have gone up some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 01:40 pm:

Some of the parts folks give away new ones free at swap meets. Surprisingly they're not listed in any of the catalogues I checked.

At swap meets I've seen T era sticks priced at $20 and more.

You can also make your own.




Unfortunately I don't know the sources for these, so I can't make more legible copies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 02:24 pm:

I have no problem paying $18 for a period gas gauge. I would not be actually using it if I had it anyway. I like to have period items to go along with the car, tools & such.
I was not aware of a T having a 15 gallon tank. What T has those much larger tanks?

Thanks,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 03:39 pm:

Torpedos??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Davis. Tomball Texas on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 03:59 pm:

Willis, Mac's has them in current catalog for $1.95 part # T2900G, also You see them listed all the time on e-bay for original Ford and vendor sticks with ad,s for Gulf,Texaco ect, condition varies gas soking takes it toll on the lettering but some nice ones pop up from time to time at a good price, Put Ford gas stick, in e-bay search and they will send a automated alert when one shows up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 04:51 pm:

Did I miss the memo. "Don't trust a stick to measure gasoline in the tank?"

Using a stick is either showing a full tank (gasoline to the top of the tank and the stick is wet to the top), gasoline half-way(ish)(dry on the top half and wet on the bottom half of the stick), or the bottom of the tank is a weebit damp or dry (Empty).

What more do you want from a stick?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 05:28 pm:

George,

Clearly you missed the memo!
Iím looking for a period stick, not for dipping the tank but, as a piece to go along with the car. Which is something the original owners used back in the day. I do not want a reproduction but an original. The one I saw is not like what others have posted nor what is on eBay. Wish I could post a pic now but, I donít have one.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Erfert on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 06:17 pm:

I found a fuel measure stick in the pile of wood roof slat's that came with the tudor. It looked like a slat but was dirty and when I cleaned it off and it dryed I found it was from Shell Petrolem Company, Roxana, IL. This was the Shell oil company established in 1912. The tudor came from a barn aprox 75 miles North of there. It can barely be read as it is red letters but that is my story. It is accurate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 06:23 pm:

Steve's right. I've picked up a few for free from T parts vendors and others at Hershey. They're new but, hey, they're free!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 06:38 pm:

Might the 15 gallon measurement apply to the larger tank on the Fordson tractors?

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry & Sharon Miller, Westminster, CO on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 07:05 pm:

My education: Most of the sticks on ebay are reproductions, most likely made in China. They have NO advertising on them and they all are EXACTLY the same.

Real sticks usually, I say usually, have advertising on them. That's why they were given away. Sort of like business cards today.

I suggest you spend the money at Snyders rather than $18 for a reproduction off of ebay. YES, I have the reproduction stick and it's no where near as good as a real one. That's for sure.

Terry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 07:31 pm:

Willis
I reread the memo.

You are looking for a stick that makes sense - This dip stick was picked up along the way for $3.50.

It says Ford cars - 10 gallons and measures 10 3/8 inches. Way different than those shown by Steve's tables. Six gallons measures at 6 inches, making it close for an round tank?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 07:53 pm:

I bought mine at a local antique show. Cost me $12 and has a local stamping on the back. Nice to have one from where you live. I use it for every fill up.



Tank

Stick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 08:03 pm:

Terry,

The stick at the antique shop has a Ford dealership advertised on it in Wisconsin. I canít recall the name or city.
Thatís what I like about the originals that a number of you have shown, the advertising!

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 08:24 pm:

I have approximately 2 dozen different stick gauges hanging on the wall BUT none are from a Ford dealership - don't see them often ! I'd buy it if you want to pick it up for me - maybe ? grin-grin !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 08:43 pm:

I couldnít find them in Snyderís catalog. I checked T2900F and I get the square gas tank.
What is the Snyder or Langís part number?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 09:16 pm:

Tony,

Thatís the number in the Macís catalog. Itís $2.99

Cheers,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 09:17 pm:

Sorry, itís T2900G.

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 09:28 pm:

I don't see Snyder's or Langís but Mac's is:
http://www.macsautoparts.com/ford_model_t/model-t-ford-gas-gauge-wooden-stick.ht ml
FWIW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 10:08 pm:

I would say that's not a bad price Willis. If it is an original, it's like the screwdrivers, the wrenches, etc. Made nearly a hundred years ago. All these goodies have gone up in price through the years. Grab it when you see it, or it will be gone! It's getting harder and harder to find stuff that was around a hundred years ago, especially in Michigan. JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 10:23 pm:

I bought a used one off of Ebay for show and tell then got a large paint stirring stick and used the original one as a pattern to mark the new one, which I use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, March 30, 2018 - 03:28 am:

About a five years ago, I attempted to re-invent the wheel, so to speak. -See, I didn't care for the wooden, paint-stirrer fuel dipsticks and so, tried to make something that would read a little easier. -The photo explains the idea better than I can in words. -



While the soda-straw suction principle worked, the stupid, clear plastic tubing I used was too brittle to be practical and I'm sure that of the eighty or so I made, all have cracked and broken. -I was unable to obtain a thicker, more durable clear plastic tubing with the necessary small inside diameter (Anything bigger than 3/16ths of an inch and the fuel would drop right out). -It was a decent idea, horribly executed. -Turned out the wooden paint-stirrers could get the job done just fine. -Chalk another one up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, March 30, 2018 - 02:50 pm:

So who has the correct measurements for a stick used in the 15 gallon tank?

I'd sure like to have one!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Friday, March 30, 2018 - 04:19 pm:

Make one ... gallon at a time. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Davis. Tomball Texas on Friday, March 30, 2018 - 05:05 pm:

The experimental aircraft association members have come up with all sort's of creative home built gas gauges, many could be adapted to work on Model T gas tanks, all Radiant technology has a "Belite" fuel probe system that uses fuel head pressure / weight to indicate liquid level, should work on most any model T tank, probably best suited for 26/27.Check it out at beliteaircraftstore.com/fuel-probe-system/ would T off gas tank outlet connection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, March 30, 2018 - 05:50 pm:

For whatever it is worth. I have a couple "modern" reproductions with Lang's name on them. I have had them for over 45 years I think, so even they are nearly antiques now.
I have a couple original era ones that I found under the seat of one of the cars I used to have. But they are not made of wood. Some sort of pressed paper board. It looks a lot like the wooden ones, with the multiple tank types and gallon markings along with advertising (not a Ford dealer).
I wouldn't recommend trying one of the paper ones even once. With age, the paper is probably so soft that it would likely begin to disintegrate with even a single dipping. But it is still nice for show and tell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim R. Wynn on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 10:02 am:

I just purchased 2 wooden lipsticks with advertising to keep in car for looks. I also just purchased 2 metal rod dip sticks with wooden file type handles and slot on bottom end for opening oil petcocks. Wooden ones off eBay and metal ones from Bob in Loves Park, IL. Both serve their purpose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 10:44 am:

These are two I made for my Tudor. I need to find something better than Sharpie to print with.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 10:48 am:

Design the graphics on your computer and have the sticks silkscreened for you. Have a couple dozen made and give them out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 10:50 am:

Richard,

Thatís cool! It makes them look vintage.

Cheers,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 11:05 am:

Again I may have missed the memo. The tank is either full - gasoline all the way to the top. Half tank gasoline some when between empty or full.. Or empty or close to being empty.

The wooden measuring stick - is just an indicator (a go, no go) of being able to go or not.

If you are looking for greater accuracy, then the inventor of up dated ignition certainly can come up with a modern computer chip measuring device that can indicate gallons in tank and distance that can be traveled before the motor is starved for fuel. Why it could also tell the slope of the hill you are climbing.

The early wooden sticks were advertisement and, at best, an indicator if there was fuel in the tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 11:21 am:

The visible gas pumps pumped the desired amount of gas into the cylinder and then it flowed into the car. It was important to know how many gallons you needed back in the day. Overfilling would have not been welcomed.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 12:26 pm:

All of this about a little stick of wood... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 12:41 pm:

Ever try to measure with an acorn?

The acorn will germinate in 4 to 6 weeks. It is a five step process - Step 5: Stand back and watch your acorn sprout into an oak.

The stick is much easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 01:23 pm:

George...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 01:33 pm:

Some people must use Acorns because I find them in a lot of old gas tanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 02:49 pm:

There is a lot of lore surrounding the selling of gasoline from visible pumps. The station attendant had to be pretty good at simple math to keep up !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 03:37 pm:

I have been wondering about that stick.

I put it in the tank last nightó
Again. How long before it sprouts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 04:10 pm:

Rich B, A long time ago, it was common for those antique "visible" gasoline pumps to be at swap meets. One could sometimes see a half a dozen or more at a single meet. One thing I noticed, was that a lot of the unrestored ones had a few small rocks in the bottom of the glass. It puzzled me, so I asked one of the collectors about them. He said "Think about it". "When the pump is standing up, the glass is above eye level, and the bottom inch of the glass is covered by a metal band surrounding the base of the glass." Even at seven cents per gallon, the rocks which could not be seen amounted to an extra penny in the attendant's pocket.
I found that to be an interesting touch of irony in that the "visible" pumps were made because being able to see the amount of gasoline one got made it more difficult for the attendants to cheat customers. I guess some things about people never change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 04:25 pm:

Thats why we cant see how much gas we get today. My Harley has a 5 gallon tank and that includes reserve. We were with 5 other bikes. I had not hit reserve yet and filled the bike up and it took4.93 gallons. Something fishy? Told the attendant and he said they just calibrated the pumps that week. Hmmm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Royster on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 06:11 pm:

I doubt the rocks in the pump story is entirely correct. The weights and measures division in every state (Dept.of Agriculture)checked all pumps once a year for accuracy within 2 cubic inches, even in the days of visible pumps. I still have the state approves test cans for NC. Also most stations were consignees and received a small commission on each gallon sold. A few rocks would make little distance. Gulf Oil Distributor since 1925.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 07:22 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 08:33 pm:

It still goes on. About twenty years ago, an investigation in Califunny (sometimes they do something right?), found that one of the largest chains in the state had a significant number of locations in which a hidden switch in the office altered the metering accuracy of all the pumps by about ten percent. (The electronic measuring only required a small resister switched into a circuit to temporarily change the accuracy.) According to the article in the paper, "well hidden wires" did the rest.
I had bought gasoline in one of that chain in my old Ford pickup that I drove for work for seventeen years. I knew VERY WELL that the tank in that truck at absolutely empty would take almost exactly seventeen gallons. I pulled into the station near empty, probably close to two gallons in it, and according to the stations "certified" pumps, put slightly over eighteen gallons into it. A nearly three gallon impossibility. I did complain to the state weights and measures with details of how I KNEW it was wrong. It was about two years later the article was in the paper about the chain of stations being caught. I don't know if my complaint was significant to the investigation or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Monday, April 09, 2018 - 11:09 pm:

Years ago my wife and I were in California and went to a market in Pasadena. The wife was collecting Model T humourous postcards at the time.

One vendor has some and intimated that he had many more at home. He gave us his address and a few days later we went went to his premises, which was actually a garage not far from LA airport.

He had numerous vehicles one in particular was a yellow 1960's Ford which he told us had been owned by Charles Manson and he got it from an auction of Manson's belongings when he went to jail.

Amongst his collections was one of wooden gas gauges, over 300 which he offered to sell for $400 the lot.

As we were already loaded up with stuff in our suitcases ( and I didn't want to spend that on wooden sticks) I passed, wish now that I maybe should have bit the bullet and purchased them.

I have on in each of my cars under the seat, easiest way to check the amount, I always fill the tank each day I am out driving the car, that way I can go as far as I like and up any hill without a problem. Only time low fuel is a problem is if there is a strong headwind.


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