KWIK - POLY

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: KWIK - POLY
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 05:28 am:

Did anyone ever use Kwik-Poly that the vendors sell? I was told it was good for dried and cracked spokes I know I need new wheel spokes but right now it is going to be a while before the TT will be road worthy and now I just need it to be a roller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 05:47 am:

Eugene, I have used Kwik-Poly for years. You can almost say it is a miracle in a can. I have saved a lot of original Model T wood with it. That said, I would never ever use it to repair rotted wheel spokes. It definitely does not have that kind of strength. I have used it to tighten loose spokes as a temporary fix, that should be revisited once a year depending on how much you drive. I have a friend that used it to repair dry rotted spokes. I won’t ride in his car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 06:30 am:

The spokes are not rotten, just cracked and dry, I was hoping to keep water out, they seam to be strong other wise


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 08:12 am:

Kwik-Poly!...and all these years I thought it was a very fast parrot! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 08:44 am:

I used Kwik-Poly on the rear wood strip where the top attaches, on my Touring, and also on the wood tack frame under the front seat cushion. Both areas were riddled with nail holes, and without repair, would have been useless. It worked much better that glue or epoxy because I could brush it into small cracks, and it was very fluid before setting up. The results were great, and I keep some for other new projects. However, I don't think I would ever use it on spokes. For me, dried, cracked spokes demand only one remedy... replacement.
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 10:38 am:

Eugene,

Cracked & dry usually does not equal "strong". Kwik-Poly is good stuff. Lots of people use it for spokes. I have, many years ago, and I can tell you, it doesn't last and I wouldn't do it again. I will say, I didn't do it because the spokes were weathered, but because they were loose and creaking.

Can you show some pictures of your spokes?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 10:39 am:

Wow! This thread is taking me back. Harold Bowden was a member of the Model T club in St. Louis and was the man who introduced Kwik-Poly to the old car hobby. This was his obituary in our club newsletter.

In Memoriam

Harold C. Bowden

November 24, 1923 - April 25, 2002


It is with deep regret that we report the passing of Harold Bowden, a fixture in the Model T Ford Club of Greater Saint Louis and also in the Model T world for at least three decades. It has been said of Harold that he probably bought, sold, worked on, gave advice about, drove, sold parts for or at one time owned half the Model T’s in eastern Missouri.

Harold and his wife, Ruth, used to hold annual sales which were the stuff of legends. Harold was also known throughout the antique car hobby for his wood repair product, first called RSP and then known by the name Kwik-Poly. Harold had discovered the product when he was working for Ozark Air Lines and immediately recognized its value to the old car hobbyist. It is now used by car owners nationwide.

I remember on an overnight tour one year, I expressed some concern to Harold about an oil leak that was causing oil to puddle on the engine pan. “Well,” said Harold, looking serious, “I’ll tell you how to fix it. If you remove the pan and leave it off, the oil will leak directly onto the ground. Then you won’t see it and you won’t worry about it.”

Harold was an asset to our club and one of the unique people who make this hobby so much fun. Our heartfelt condolences to Harold’s family and friends. We shall miss him.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 11:35 am:

Eugene states that he just needs the wheels to use as "rollers" until he restores the car. In this use, I would use Kwik-Poly, as apparently, the storage is subject to some weather. Just don't let anyone think the wheels are sound for driving around!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 12:01 pm:

David,

You're correct, I missed the latter part of his posting.

Eugene,

If you just want to keep water out and preserve what you already have, I'd suggest soaking the spokes with Thompson's Water Seal. Much cheaper than Kwik-Poly and will do what you want. Kwik-Poly REALLY soaks into dried wood. You'd need a lot of it to do 4 wheels that are only going to be used as "rollers".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 05:12 pm:

Hmm, not to be argumentative, as Jerry's right, the Kwik Poly isn't cheap and does soak in--one of it's unique properties, but Thompson's is (or was) mostly silicone--and I wouldn't have such a product anywhere near my shop or cars--it makes painting a real pain!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 05:27 pm:

I have used Kwik Poly for various wood repairs, mostly on my boat and house. I cures in a matter of seconds so you have to be kwik. I extend the cure time by keeping both the bottles in the freezer. It also extends the shelf time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem S.E. Michigan on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 07:47 pm:

David,

Didn't know that about Thompsons. Maybe another brand is better? Could probably even just use linseed oil.


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