PUTTING TOGETHER 1926 MODEL T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: PUTTING TOGETHER 1926 MODEL T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronald Zinkel on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 10:39 am:

HOW MUCH MIGHT IT COST TO RESTORE AND PUT TOGETHER A 1926 MODEL T 4-DOOR SEDAN? 1000s OF PIECES. BUT FULL CAR.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 10:58 am:

How much of the work will you do yourself? The more you have done by others, the higher the cost. It also depends on labor rates where you have the work done. The range of cost is too great to estimate from the information provided.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Macleod on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 11:19 am:

I think it depends on what you want to do with what you have. Do you want a car that is merely reassembled as is or are you wanting to restore it as you go (an answer that likely would result in a more satisfying car). My suggestion is to find someone who has worked on a lot of them to get an idea of what is needed. Do realize that anyone's estimate is more of a shot into the fog than anything else. The only correct answer is time plus materials.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 11:23 am:

Unfortunately no one will be able to answer your question. Too many variables...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 01:13 pm:

Anyone can answer!

Here's mine:

.. "MIGHT IT COST TO RESTORE AND PUT TOGETHER A 1926 MODEL T 4-DOOR SEDAN"

The Fordor needs solid wood frame, with that missing or busted or rotted add $3000 for wood kit.

Good sheet metal needing only stripping and painting cost about $1000 - $3000 for all fenders, hood, and body to be refinished.

All new glass in windows to replace dangerous plate cost $600 for material

All new top covering, and upholstery with headliner and cushions, more if seat spring are missing, cost $ 2900 for material.

Total chassis rebuild, engine professional done with new parts, transmission rebuilt with newer parts, magneto field coil redone, magnets recharged, new coils, coil box rebuilt, rebuilt accessories, gen, starter, Bendix, new battery, new radiator, rebuild front end, rear axle and drive line..$10,000.

New tires, tubes, valve stem covers, $900, and to redo wood wheels, with good or new split rims, add $1200. If going with set of 5 wire wheels, sand blast and powder coat, add $1000.

So MIGHT cost you about $12,000 in materials, add labor for 400 hours of restoration...that adds about $20,000, plus the restored chassis to put the finished body on.... totals $42,000 for MIGHT cost, letting others do it.

If doing all labor yourself, you MIGHT get down to $12,000 total, if the wood frame work is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Velarde on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

alot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 02:13 pm:

Dan Treace - Your post is a pretty darn good argument for taking up some other hobby, like maybe for example, stamp collecting! ( :^) ...... ( :^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 02:31 pm:

Harold

Wise old adage, never keep track of expenses when restoring a Model T...

For restorations, found the easy way, just park the T in your garage and start throwing money at it :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 02:36 pm:

The restoration doesn't have to be done all at once either. Make sure it's sound and safe, repair and inspect the important driveline parts and enjoy it. You can always continue to do a makeover as time and funding allows.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble Northern Michigan on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 03:37 pm:

I think Dans numbers are good. For me the deciding factor is the condition of the body wood. The 4 door is the only body for 26-27 that was not all steel. My restoration experience is half the effort is chassis, half is the body. Re-wooding a 4 door doubles the body restoration effort. If the body wood is in pieces, i would restore the chassis and look for a different body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Duquette Grand Forks, ND on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 03:49 pm:

Mr. Zinkel, Lots of great advice and info here for you. I don't know what condition your car is in but maybe another approach is to put the car together as it is now. Maybe get it running. Get some help from local T owners. You will learn a lot about your car and Model Ts and what a restoration takes. Then you can decide if a restoration is a good next move.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 06:15 pm:

More than it's worth by a mile. You could have every single nut and bolt and if it all needed rehabbing you'd be at it for many years and many $. Up to you though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 07:39 pm:

18 months to 3 years, depending on if you're retired or not.
Don't let scare stories about costs stop you. I found the only things i need to spend money on are things that matter. The rest is detail.
Brakes are a good thing to spend money on. Once the chassis & driveline are good & safe you can start assembling the body. Wood framed bodies can be a very time consuming thing... I should know. But they're not impossible to do. Even if you have to whittle timber with an axe & pocket knife it can be done. Just takes longer.
A good bandsaw is your friend but you don't need one. One of those vibrating blade tools and maybe a jigsaw/sabersaw thing and an angle grinder with sanding disks on it can do it.

As for rust. Metal can be welded. Sheet metal can be repaired even with a propane torch if need be. Don't know how I lived without my propane/MAPP torch, once I got it I use it all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 07:49 pm:

Unless the present owner took the car apart (or even partially apart) himself, I don't know how it can be said its a "complete car". The 26-27 fordor sedan has probably more individual parts (and rarer parts) than any other 26-27 body style, because they were a combination of 26-27 mechanicals and pre 26 body work, and they were probably the lowest production body style because they were the highest priced body style of those years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 07:53 pm:

Forget the fordor.
Buy my 26 touring, put the fordor engine, transmission and rear end in my touring, after you rebuild them, and just drive the heck out of it.
That would save you thousands.
Also, does the fordor come with a good title?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 07:54 pm:

I consider myself extremely fortunate. I inherited Dad's '27 Fordor, the car that got me into T's. It was a running and driving, unrestored car. Through this forum, I made one of my best friends. He had just finished his own Fordor restoration. He performed the bulk of the restoration work, which included all new wood except for 4 pieces, sheet metal repair, top, body work, paint, interior, glass, wiring, ect. I did the drivetrain and axles. I went a little overboard on the engine, using a Scat crank, Stipe 280 cam, and Prus iron head. I am afraid to total everything up, but I am sure the cost was well over $25,000.00, not including my labor. Having Dad's car finished and ready to drive any time I wish, is priceless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joss sanderson on Saturday, April 14, 2018 - 08:19 pm:

One should restore any car as a hobby. If the process is enjoyable, go for it. Also are you wanting a presentable car that is a driver? If so the cost will be much less as locating the correct horn button no longer becomes an issue.


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