Body wood kit source

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Body wood kit source
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Saturday, April 21, 2018 - 08:52 pm:

Anyone know of a source for body wood kit
15-22 roadster


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, April 21, 2018 - 09:27 pm:

Well Bob, first thing ya does is go to the real lumber yard and git yerself some niiice lumber. Then, once you've recovered from sticker shock, you git your table saw--oh, if'n ya don't have one, git a good 'un, not a cheapo. Oh, and you'll need a band saw and a router--oh and a drum sander is nice. If yer real fancy, a planer too. . . .
Then ya gets to cutin' 'n fittin' and once ya's done, ya got yerself a real nice T body, AND a nice woodshop too! Any project where you end up with more tools is a GOOD project! :-)

Now about kits, there's only a few folks doing them, and due to the nature of the original bodies being made by different folks, any kit requires fitting, so don't be surprised by that! Now, you don't live that far away from me, and there's a guy here that would do an incredible job, but he's way behind on "Honey-do's" and fixing up his rental house. I'd volunteer, as I have to do my '25 soon ("Soon" is a relative term) but I don't know just when "soon" is! I too have some major honey-do's here, called, "finish the house or else. . ." Gee, we've only been here uh, um, 13 years?? What's the hurry?
:-) (Besides, the roof isn't leaking, I'd rather fix the T and go for a drive. . . .No, I haven't been able to sell that idea yet. . .)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 02:57 am:

Two of the well known ones are:

Cubels -- http://fordwood.com/

Classic Wood Products -- http://www.classicwoodproductsllc.com/

Caution - in addition to any of those wood kits needing fitting for the body (at least 5 different body manufacturers supplied Ford during that time), Even the same body makers did things different at different times. Most notably -- in the 1918 time frame some but not all of them went back to wood seat frames and the back to metal seat frames after about a year or so.

The 1922 roaster would probably have more metal brackets than the 1915.

If you or anyone else wants a free electronic copy of R.V. Anderson's article that he did on his 1923 low cowl roadster -- drop me a note saying "Please send roadster rewooding article" or something similar. The club allows us to send those for free for non-commercial use to support our club, hobby, and to help get a few more Fords back on the road.

Good luck with your project.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 09:00 am:

Hap has some good advice about remembering that Ford used different body makers to build T bodies. If you buy a wood kit you will have to do some fit up here and there to get get things to fit just right. Maybe more or maybe less depending on your car.
Just remember the wood just won't drop in and fit right up. You have to do the final fit up


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Monday, April 23, 2018 - 03:58 am:

I used a kit from Cubel's on the 15 Touring I used to have. You'll need something to build it on; I did a frame mock-up with 4x8 lumber on a metal frame with scaffolding casters. By using that instead of a full 'T' frame I didn't have the excess length getting in the way at the front, and it made it much easier. You can't rush it.... there are many, many hours in fitting. To start on the touring I had to precisely figure where the rear panel would be based on where the front of the side panels would end up, then start fitting the wood. Every piece of sheet metal was put on and removed numerous times to determine if the piece of wood I was fitting was done. The notching of the sills and trimming each piece to fit is something that you can't rush, because you need all of those joints to be tight.

If the doors aren't completely straight with the body you can tweak them a bit with turn-buckles inside the door. You can't pull them in a lot, but sometimes 1/4" makes a huge difference on the final appearance.

When you get your kit check every piece off against the drawing, and be sure everything is straight and true. There's not much worse than finding a warped sill or missing piece six months after you receive the kit and have fit a bunch of pieces!

Unless things have changed, don't expect great drawings and instructions. If I remember correctly I received neatly hand drawn sketches of the wood structure with each of the pieces numbered. No assembly instructions.... I solicited a lot of feedback from other 'T' people. This was the early 90's, well before the forum existed.

If you can avoid it don't set a schedule for completion, because you just can't tell how long it will take. Other things pop up (house work, honey-dos, kids, you name it..). By the time I finished I had over a year and a half worth of free time in it. If I didn't have anything else to do it would have taken less time, but life has a way of getting in the way of hobbies.

Have fun with the project! Post pictures!!!


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