Removing Sediment Bulb from 1926 Roadster Pick Up - Need Ideas

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Removing Sediment Bulb from 1926 Roadster Pick Up - Need Ideas
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 07:48 am:

The sediment bulb on the 1926 Roadster Pick Up is leaking/weeping from the bottom and the shut off valve is getting cantankerous. I cannot be certain it will continue to operate as a reliable shut off valve. I have another shut off valve just to the side of the bulb that acts as the primary shut off, but the weeping has caused me to decide to remove and replace the bulb.

I would like to remove this old one that is weeping and creating a safety issue. I spent some time yesterday trying to unscrew the old one. It will not budge. I am not certain how it was installed, but it is super tight.

There is still gas in the gas tank so I cannot heat up the connection/threads. I am also afraid to go into gorilla mode. I am afraid that something may happen that I will regret if I use too much force.

I need some thoughts on how best to safely unscrew the sediment bulb. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 08:13 am:

With stuck things that are threaded, if I can't/won't use heat, I've found success with the micro-rocking method.

I spray some kind of penetrating oil on the joint and put a wrench on the item to be removed (on this item I think a plumbing wrench might work).

Then I move it in one direction, then back in the opposite direction and keep doing that...even if it looks like nothing's happening. Back and forth, over and over again. If it even budges, just a micro amount, then more penetrating oil, then more rocking back and forth.

If it moves at all, the oil with penetrate down the threads some and will sort "be waiting" right there to go further once the rocking continues.

I've loosened all sorts of horribly stuck threaded items this way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 08:24 am:

Heat does not = FIRE... I have used boiling water in these situations with great success. I would open the bottom drain and catch as much fuel as I could first leave the bottom drain open and the gas filler cap off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 08:30 am:

First wire brush the threaded portion of that pipe thread fitting of the valve on the gas tank outlet. Clean well then apply lots of penetrating oils to that spot.

Open and drain the bulb. Remove the gas line from the bulb.

Now use two wrenches. One like a pipe wrench on that threaded stub of the bulb going into the tank. Another like Vise Grips on the gas tank flange outlet That is to keep pressure off that soldered and riveted outlet.

Now twist counterclockwise on the pipe wrench and rotate the bulb out of the outlet fitting. Itís tapered pipe thread so after the first turn the rest is easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 09:19 am:

Eric
Consider repairing it in place. The bottom part unthreads and repair parts are available from the usual sources.
Hook a piece of hose onto the outlet and drain the tank.
Remove the valve assembly. I lubricate mine with ordinary soap. Remove the lower screen unit and service as needed. Replace the gasket if needed.
Just a thought


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George n LakeOzark,Missourah on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 01:52 pm:

I had to use a big enough pipe wrench thing to get mine off. The bulb had pipet heads on it. It was stubborn also. As Dan said use a wire brush to clean exposed threads and a penetrating oil soaks for a few days. Pipe wrench and some tapping with a hammer got it off. After that you can clean it up and replace old gaskets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 07:34 pm:

The cast female threaded part is riveted to the tank. I have seen these leak, especially after someone tried to remove the sediment bulb/shut off valve with a Stillson or pipe wrench, without using a backup wrench on the part riveted to the tank. Make sure you use a backup wrench on the female part to avoid breaking the soldered joint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Dunlap - Orlando, Florida on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 08:57 pm:

Great tips. Good thing I didnít use gorilla strength on it and try to force things. Sounds like I could have made a mess of things. I will work on scraping the threads, followed by penetrating oil, and then the pipe wrench and back up wrench. Thanks again.

I will try to remember to update this thread with the results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 09:27 pm:

Don't use JB weld....grin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, April 22, 2018 - 11:42 pm:

He hasn't broken anything, yet, Hal.


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