O.T. NRS Spindle bolts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: O.T. NRS Spindle bolts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Kiefaber on Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 08:56 pm:

I need a set of spindle bolts for my Model R. I don't believe regular T spindle bolts are the correct size. Does anyone have a source for these? Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 03:01 am:

Bob,

I would think the Early Ford Registry forum might give you a quicker response? From memory (not as good as notes) I think they used Model T spindle bolts (also called Kingpins) on the Richard Oswald Model N project. I believe they had to machine the spindle bushings to fit the Model N Spindle and have the proper diameter for the Model T spindle bolt. I think that was in one of the news letters.

A machinist should be able to produce the spindle bolts per the factory drawing. I'm not sure about how they would harden them. A copy of the factory drawing for the spindle bolts is probably available from the Benson Ford Archives.

Somewhere in a folder I have a listing of the drawings they have for the N, R, S, & SR Fords. Trent put that together and a copy is available at the Benson Ford Archives. If you give them the part number, they should be able to look up the factory number and tell if they have the Factory Drawing for the part or not. But we redid the floors in the house and that folder is out in the garage with several other boxes of stuff.

And if you are going to have some machined -- going with CNC machining should allow you to keep the computer code so other sets can be made in the future. Of course the later computers might not be able to use the earlier code/programming?

Also, there may be some other folks that would like to purchase a set. Sometimes having the first one made is the most expensive part of the project. And having a few more made (with people committed to pay for them) reduces the per item cost.

And if you find a supplier -- please let me know as I could use a pair also (plan B is to have the really worn ones built back up).

Oh, and please say "Hi" to Ghost for me. And if you have a chance, please send me an update every now and then.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 03:28 am:

Note there was also a listing of Model T parts that would fit and function on the Model N, R, S, & SR cars. It was a rather short list. It included the front bearings and races, rear brake shoes etc. I looked but I did not locate a copy of it. I think it was reproduced in one of the Early Ford Registry newsletters? Most of the parts are annotated in Lang's catalog. For example the block hub caps are listed 1906-10. The Timken roller bearings are listed 1906-1918 as a replacement for the ball bearings etc. I did NOT see the 1906-08 cars listed under the spindle bolts in their catalog. So that probably is not one that was a direct replacement. Which would agree with why they had to machine special bushings to use a T spindle in the Richard Oswald project. (That assumes I remember that correctly.)

Respectfully added,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by Hap_tucker on April 26, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Kiefaber on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 04:53 am:

Thanks Hap, I belong to the EFR but have lost my password to the forum. I have seen the list of the interchangeable parts between the T and NRS. The kingpins are not listed. I tried to install a T king pin and it did not fit. The car now has some makeshift bolt in lt that has an open oiler which is not correct for the car. Btw, Ghost is all finished except for the interior. I plan on having the original pieces reproduced. I'll try to get you some photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 05:55 am:

Robert, send me an email tmorsher@icloud.com , and I will share a direct email to Dave Dunlavy , he can help you get set up on the EFR forum again. I also cannot get in, so need to have Dave help me again. T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 08:54 am:

Robert, please post the photos of Ghost here as well. I as well as others will enjoy seeing ghost in all its glory


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dunlavy, Iowa USA on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 12:54 pm:

Please feel free to ask any questions you might have. Dave Dunlavy, (use link on EFR Website or email directly, Dave@EFR1.com or simply call 563.387.3736) IT's true I don't get paid but I will help you. Cheers
EFR Menu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Kiefaber on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 08:14 pm:

Dave, I'll get in touch.
Gary, I will try to document what I have done to Ghost and will post on the forum, thanks for your interest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Kiefaber on Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 08:46 pm:

Dave, I'll get in touch.
Gary, I will try to document what I have done to Ghost and will post on the forum, thanks for your interest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, April 27, 2018 - 01:00 am:

Please, I too would like to see and read about what has been done to Ghost. Such a wonderful car!
Good luck with the NRS also. I would think that T king pins could be made to work. However, they may not look quite right. King pins are often made for various Horseless Carriage era cars. I suspect that they are often simply cut and finish ground from a high grade tool steel. That likely may not require serious heat treating which is tricky to get right. Hardness too thin can flake and wear poorly. Too hard becomes brittle and the king pin could fracture and break (definitely NOT a good thing).
Non-hardened high grade steel (tool steel or otherwise) should be strong enough, and wear well enough for an early car that will likely never drive another twenty thousand miles, mostly in non-dusty conditions.

That is my opinion. Others may disagree.


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