Horn ID, Maintenance Q's

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Horn ID, Maintenance Q's
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Babitz on Monday, April 30, 2018 - 11:39 pm:

The horn on my new '27 wasn't working. Adjusting the tension on the brushes got it quacking like a duck, but I'd like to know:

Is it a 6 or 12 V horn? No markings I can see.
If it's a 6V, can I safely use it in a 12V car with a series resistor matching the motor coil resistance?
Where does it need lube, if at all?
The diaphragm seems fine but what looks like a cork gasket is very thin and crumbly. Advice on material to fashion a new gasket?
Is this a common Model T horn?
The patent date is 1914. Is it from an older car?

plate
horn


Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, April 30, 2018 - 11:52 pm:

That's a motor driven horn - Klaxon style - not stock Model T.

Could have been used on a number of cars in the teens and twenties. Aftermarket if used on Fords. Do a search on Google books and you may find some period advertisements for it. Use a date range of 1910 through 1930 when searching.

Lubricate the motor bearings with light machine oil.

You can also clean the commutator.

It's six volts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, April 30, 2018 - 11:58 pm:

I have a motor driven horn on my touring. Here's what a few drops of oil did to it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKzJP6XJIVY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 - 12:01 am:

Oh, the gasket. How about cork? Any local auto parts store should have it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 - 12:04 am:

Found a lot of coverage/press releases in period trade journals - click on this link:

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks&ei=LeXnWvbgNoeJjwSd8rugBA&q=safeguard+%22motor+driven%22+horn+duplex+%22electric%22+pittsburgh&oq=safeguard+%22motor+driven%22+horn+duplex+%22electric%22+pittsburgh&gs_l=psy-ab.3...9902.29492.0.29717.20.15.0.0.0.0.365.1936.0j5j3j2.10.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..13.0.0....0.Fk1qwJEaxnQ

Just one example:

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 - 12:10 am:

A thick blotter paper will make a fine diaphragm gasket. much of the sound is dependent on that gasket!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Babitz on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 - 08:53 pm:

I adjusted everything and lubed it up. It makes a good loud noise operated at 12V, but the motor doesn't even turn when I drop the voltage to 6V. When did 12V electrical systems become common? Is it possible the motor was replaced with a 12V DC motor at some point in its history? The coil resistance measures about 1 ohm, so a 6A draw on 6V or 12A at 12V.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, May 02, 2018 - 02:58 am:

Dodge Brothers used 12 volts from '14 until Chrysler took over. Others did too, so yours could easily be a 12 volt horn.


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