Center door alignment

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Center door alignment
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Schrepfer on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 01:50 pm:

I am looking for someone who has some experience with correcting the door/s alignment on a center door model T. I understand that the frame should be checked for straightness and corrected if necessary. If the wood in the frame appears to be in good condition, are there any other ways at that point to make adjustments to help align the doors?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 02:18 pm:

You can try shim's between the frame and the body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Schrepfer on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 03:05 pm:

Thanks Don. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 04:27 pm:

Joe I have also tweaked the hinges by bending them forward or back. It all depends on how much the door is off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 05:00 pm:

Old wood framework can warp with age, making door alignment difficult. Some people have had some success putting "eye hooks" inside the door and a turn buckle to pull and/or twist the door to something near matching the body. This is difficult because you must do so without interfering with the space the window uses to lower into the door.
I have also seen and made steel rods with ends welded on each end to bolt inside the wood frame. The door would then be forcibly twisted (somewhat beyond what is apparently needed), and the rod installed. Holes have to be carefully drilled so to be a tight fit bolting the rod in place. When the force is removed, the door will settle back a bit (and probably continue to try to do so). But the steel rod (I used 3/8 inch) will take some of the pressure and help to hold the door somewhat straighter than it wants to be.
All that can help, but not cure the problem. And is only worthwhile if the wood is still in reasonably good condition. If dry rotten, bug ridden, or otherwise weak from age and/or exposure? Such remedies will not hold up for very long. Condition of the body framework is much more critical and important than the door framework is. Safety becomes a major concern on either one. If the wood isn't solid enough, It really needs to be replaced. Although it is also surprising how much old wood can be strengthened by use of certain epoxy type products. But again, if the wood is too far gone? That won't work either.

Good luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 06:02 pm:

Shims behind the hinges is another trick to make the top and bottom of the door parallel to the ground- just like shimming the hinges on a kitchen cabinet door so everything is plumb.

For example: a shim under bottom hinge will raise the opposite top corner. A shim under the top hinge will lower the opposite bottom corner.

Hope what I typed is easy to understand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Schrepfer on Thursday, May 03, 2018 - 06:44 pm:

Thank you Wayne and Erik. Joe


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