A lesson learned .

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: A lesson learned .
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 07:58 pm:

A lesson learned,the hard way. Henry FORD I'm told once said, [I QUOTE] if a day goes by and you don't learn something, the day is wasted.well this lesson is going in my never forget cell.I think I told my new friend Bill what i did on my visit Saturday,I was removing the flat tire from a D mountable clincher rim,it is still a little cool to be monkeying around with those,but like so many of us I want to go for a ride,NOW!well I had a screwdriver shoved in to start the bead off over the rim,well when I put another in a little further down and started to pull,my hand slipped off the first one and it did a back flip, this is a foot long tool,it landed perfectly center between my blinkers,when I got thinking of what just took place it could have slid ether way and one eye would be trash,I feel the scab and thank BOZZA,I can still see from both eyes.I put down what I was doing and went to the cabin and sat down for a time to stop the leak in my nose, that's the second close call, the first time I was twelve, when my standard bread race horse was on a lunge line and I gave him too much lead, it was his first day out all winter ,and he was a bit frisky,well, he shot both hind legs out one each side of my head, his right foot nicked my right shoulder ripping my jacket I will never forget the BIG FART that came with it,I heard the swish from both feet as they flew by my head, when he got all fours back on the ground I was standing by his head hand on his halter,that's how we went back to his stall. Amous and I were the best of friends he never would have hurt me intentional,I know that.things that bring back memories.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 08:22 pm:

Richard, I had the same thing with my horse years ago. This guy was so tame you could lay on the ground and he would walk around and over but never step on you. Never kicked or bit. One day I was watering and walked behind him and both rear feet flew past my head about 12 inches from my nose. Makes one stop and think! I have always been careful not to be in that position with all horses but mine. He has never done anything like that since. Now he is 33 so I would not expect anything above the knees now. Glad you are alright. I could tell lots of lessons learned but not grabbing the halter of a run away team of work horses and wagon and keeping fingers off a spinning table saw blade tops the list.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 08:42 pm:

As I recall, using screwdrivers for mounting tires is a good way to have to learn how to patch inner tubes. I know from personal experience. There is a reason that tire irons were invented. Glad you did not get seriously hurt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 08:46 pm:

About 60 years ago Alton Hitsman Kirk Rowe and i were riding our horses acrost the Chippaw river when Kirks horse layed down! Alton laughed untill his horse layed down also.Bud kicked smokey till we cleared the bank on the north side.High and dry then i carried on like a idiot.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 09:52 pm:

I spent five years selling hay and straw at the local race track. I learned very quickly to never walk behind any horse. If you'd hear them kick the side of the stall, it would scare you. They kick hard - and fast. Also, be careful walking in front of them. Some of them will bite. They can do serious damage with their teeth.

In my experience, throughbreds are a lot worse that standardbreds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Tuesday, May 08, 2018 - 11:21 pm:

"things that bring back memories."
Uff da, I guess. Another of mine dislodged by you guys. Our horse Laddy ran me down once when out with him and his mother Lady.
Straight in front of me one moment then KERPLUNK! I was on my a## and he was behind me. How on earth did he leave no hoof prints on me?
I wish I had gotten to know all our horses better.
That perfectly good early 70's Arctic Cat clutch (round not the hex hub) that I blew up like an idiot right in front of my face. Not a scratch.
GREG, you're a lucky fella and thanks for the nasty reminder about tires and their unique ability to throw tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 03:36 am:

Of a few sorted 'barns' I worked over the years...

Most notable was when I stabled 17 Arabians...

Quirky birds to say the least... Loved every one!

David


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 09:38 am:

Yes David, you can talk till your blue in the face telling folks of ones love for there horses,just one in fifty will understand the feeling that's truly special. once you see eye to eye with them and this takes a lot of togetherness and love.I remember when Amos first came to live with me, my sister 1/2 mile down the road had a mare that was in season,now Amos is a gelding,what he was thinking who knows,guess he just wanted to show his thoughtfulness to her. well I grabbed some grain and a line and went after him, well he did not want to leave her but I was able to catch him [after a while] on the way home he decided he was going back,now if there is one thing you cant do at a time like this is let them have there own way,I just happen to be across from moms house where there is trees close to the road now he is very head strong no way was i going to hold him ,the halter he had on is nylon and the line also is the same [good thing]I jumped and swung the line around a maple tree this put he&I face to face [eye to eye,] boy did he try to get out of that .well we had a good talk for about twenty minute's that's when he and I became buddy's with respect for each others wish's.from then on I just needed to voice my opinion and he agreed.I tell you that.s a super wonderful feeling to enjoy a true friendship like that.I had horses all my life,Amous was one special one,I restored a D-W-SHULLER TWO SEAT WAGON,farm type the rear seat would come off for farm use it was a beauty,I picked my bride to be with it and we were married under a white Birch tree my grandfather planted many years ago and Amous did the honers.WONDERFUL MEMORIES.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 09:38 am:

Had a Belgian coldblood plowhorse that i used for dragging trees out of the woods. He was a gelding and had what we call monday morning sickness, he never wanted to get to work on mondays. One moday morning he started to pull on his first tree and at the moment he dropped his weight in the harness he kicked back with both feet, i heard the keys in my pocket jingle, it was that close ! He wore irons the size of a dinner plate, that was the luckiest day of my life...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 10:23 am:

Horses, unlike Model Ts, change daily just as we do. There's a world of difference between a true "horseman" and a horse owner, and ne'er the twain shall meet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 11:10 am:

Reminds me of the Morgan we had, when she decided it was time to go back the the barn there was no convincing her otherwise! Then there is the story of Tilly the other wise very laid back cow till my sister tried to ride her..she did not like someone on her back. Sister stayed on until she didn't and landed on a thistle. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 02:24 pm:

I've learned that there are two things that will spook a horse. Things that move and things that don't. That's why I stay away from them.

Get a mule. They inherit brains and stamina from their donkey fathers and size and muscle from their mare mothers. Treated right, a mule will love you as a dog will. Best you'll get from a horse is tolerance, maybe.

Your mileage may vary. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 02:42 pm:

Indeed your mileage will vary and vary widely. There are mule men, and for the most part, they're like born-again Christians. Grab you by the lapels and holler at you 'til you convert.

There's no dearth of stories about wrecks caused by green riders and spoiled horses. Makes me cringe. Lesson #1: it's never the horse's fault. Who's in charge here anyhow ?!?

The path to disaster is regarding the horse as a piece of machinery that one knows all about, having seen at least one John Wayne movie . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 04:07 pm:

LIKE I SAID JUST ONE IN FIFTY!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 08:35 pm:

So, 2% of horses suffer fools gladly. Interesting.


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