Selling long distance

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Selling long distance
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 04:24 pm:

I know that some cars and trucks are bought and sold on here, and other places when the buyer and seller are great distances apart. I have never bought and sold a vehicle that way but I know that I would be nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs if I bought a car or truck having only seen pictures or videos. How about selling one that way? I would be afraid that a buyer would be unhappy , regardless of how many good pictures or video that I provided. I would certainly never intentionally misrepresent a vehicle in order to sell it.Help me figure out to prepare my mind to be a seller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RICHARD GRZEGOROWICZ on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 04:30 pm:

Tommy,I go to Grays auctions,Herb says right off what I'm selling is being sold as is,it could be junk you decide before you buy,just take it with you when you leave.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 06:06 pm:

I recently sold a near pristine '75 Ford Granada on line with many many pics in the ad. Bought sight unseen (except for the pics) by a Florida "Collector Car Dealer". No problems at all. HOWEVER, I would never never under any circumstances buy a car that way. I personally know one person that did and he got royally screwed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 06:30 pm:

I think being unhappy after you buy a T is part of the game. Most guys around here complain about this or that after they have them a while. I'm not sure I want to hear from those who end up with my cars. They seem to keep me busy with little things.
"Just sayin'" as they say.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill's Auto Works Wakeman, Ohio on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 06:32 pm:

Tommy,
Classic cars are sold by the thousands every day, all you can do is be honest in your description & that is it. You can sleep well at night knowing you did that. The rest is up to the buyer. nobody is forcing him to buy the car. Caveat Emptor

90% of the vehicle I transport are bought sight unseen & many are 6 figure cars!

God Bless
Bill Squires(owner)
Bill's Auto Works


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 06:48 pm:

I have had to sell too many cars over the years, many of them cars I really wanted to keep. I have sold several of them long distance. I always try to be as forward and honest with what they are as I can, and usually take a bit less than I think I should have gotten. A few of those sales seemed to go okay. But several times? They have not. I do WANT people to come and look at what they are buying. But when dealing with long distance buyers, it is often just too expensive to make the trip. So they decide to take a chance. Then when they get the car, they find a dozen minor details (about half of which I specifically told them about) or turn out to not know how to work on an antique vehicle at all and start freaking out.
I much prefer to deal with people face to face.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Trotter on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 06:56 pm:

Just wondering. How is the title transferred on these long distance deals, without the seller meeting face to face?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill's Auto Works Wakeman, Ohio on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 07:41 pm:

Dale,
Many states do not require the title to be notarized, so the seller just signs it & either mails it to the buyer or many times gives it to the transporter (me) to deliver with the car. Even if the title needs to be notarized, you are only notarizing the sellers signature & it has nothing to do with the buyer, except that most notaries will require the seller to fill in the buyers name before stamping it.

(Message edited by Bills Auto Works on May 09, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 08:55 pm:

If you buy a T from me, I could not give you a Title, Just a bill of sale and a Tag. My state does not require a title for anything made before 1975. So that said I am not afraid of any car with out a title. I also have brought a few cars on line and have not had any problems. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By FreighTer Jim on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 - 10:38 pm:

Tommy,

Are you selling a car ?

Sell in a manner that you are accustomed to & comfortable with.

If you sell at a distance - close out the title by signing it over to the Buyer who paid you once you have received payment in full that is suitable to your definition - some folks do not release a vehicle until full payment is posted to their account that they can access.

Mail the title with a signature required at the receiving end - that way you have a record of the title being executed & conveyed.

FJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 08:41 am:

Virtually all my cars have been bought and sold "long distance"...never had any problem. I've always drug the trailer and a pocket full of cash each time I was in a "buying mood" with the potential of coming home "empty"...but always had a car follow me! I usually partake in a lot of long, detailed phone calls first with a prospective seller/buyer. You can tell a lot from just talking to a person first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire (La Florida!) on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 08:57 am:

I looked at 2 cars long distance. One I walked away from when I saw it in person but the other I bought,Like anything either see it yourself or have someone you trust in the area look at it. at worst you could be out gas money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 09:12 am:

All our T's except one were bought solely via photos provided and questions answered. Never an issue.

When we restored vintage VW's 3 or 4 a year were brought from the west coast, east, again based upon photos and answered questions. The majority of these were purchased by long distance buyers. I was also very up front about every minor detail and never had a dissatisfied customer. And many of those restorations were driven, not trailered back west.

Our only burn was a 69 Karmann Ghia I bought for my wife for Christmas 2005 out of the San Francisco area. Monies were transferred but the seller kept putting off the pick up by my carrier. Finally he released the car and when it arrived it was definitely NOT the car I bought. It was a total junk. The seller was wise and knew eBay has a time limit (at least then) in which to file a claim so we had no recourse. Between transport and initial cost, it was almost $10K. I sold it as a parts car for $700.

As with Kim's stolen fender, the game is changing and so are the players. Buyer beware


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 12:39 pm:

I think like you, Tommy. I would be afraid someone would be unhappy. The definitions of things like 'restored' and 'rebuilt' and 'original' and so on, are so different depending on who's doing the defining. I would not intentionally mislead anyone either, but given some of the things I've seen complained about on here, I could see an unhappy buyer even with the best intentions on the part of a seller. I don't think I could buy a car sight unseen and I don't know that I would try to sell one that way, either. I just wouldn't want a misunderstanding to result in a poor reputation. Others are comfortable with it. Me? Not so much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 08:52 pm:

I guess I will advertise it locally and see if anyone wants to actually come to look at it. If someone looks at it and drives it then they can buy it, or not I suppose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nevada Bob Middleton on Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 11:51 pm:

Every car i have sold long distance buyers been very happy cause im honest to a fault.
And i bought car my feeling are mixed and feel a plane ticket would worth it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Friday, May 11, 2018 - 08:34 am:

Question...Do most buyers assume that the seller advertises a vehicle for more than they will actually sell it for, unless the ad states that the price is firm? And do most seller actually ask more, knowing buyers think that way? I see Ts on here, and other places, priced at 50% more than they eventually sell for. I should have an advantage because I evidently got a good deal when I bought my car and can sell it for considerately less than similar cars I see advertised. I found my car at a show with a "FOR SALE" sign in the windshield and the seller agreed to a price that was 30% less than his asking price. I'm just trying to get my ducks in a row before I list. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill's Auto Works Wakeman, Ohio on Friday, May 11, 2018 - 08:48 am:

Yes Tommy,

Every buyer assumes he can buy your vehicle for well less than advertised unless you post "firm" after the price. Start HIGH, you can always accept an offer that is in the range you were looking to get. Who knows, you might get more than expected. NEVER start low, because you cannot go up!

God Bless
Bill


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