Setting the toe in on a Model T

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Setting the toe in on a Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Jenkins - Ohio on Friday, June 01, 2018 - 02:24 pm:

Have a slight Bend in my tie rod after straighten it what is the correct procedure to check the toe in


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Friday, June 01, 2018 - 02:39 pm:

Charles ; I do it this way.
93S
94M
95S
Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 01, 2018 - 03:08 pm:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG104.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, June 02, 2018 - 03:10 pm:

Some years ago I remember seeing a measuring tool that was a pipe with a spring loaded tip on the end and a gauge on the tube to measure the difference from the front of the tire to the rear of the tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, June 02, 2018 - 03:21 pm:

You can see it again if you click on the link I posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, June 02, 2018 - 08:00 pm:

I use two yardsticks..a clamp, and a tape measure.

Clamp the 2 yardsticks at the front at axle heigth
and measure the length of your clamped yardsticks with the tape measure. Write the number down..so you don't forget it like I always do!

Repeat at the back half. Compare the two measurements. Adjust as necessary. Plain and simple to do. I have Pete spot on, the '13 close enough for who it's for, and will soon do the same on my "new" '12 once I get my spindles back and the wheels on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, June 02, 2018 - 08:54 pm:

Charles, if your toe in was OK, there is probably no need to alter it. It would take a heck of a bend in the tie rod to make re-adjustment necessary.

If you are just checking, go ahead with any of the suggestions posted.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, June 02, 2018 - 10:02 pm:

The way Antonie does it is the way they did it when I worked at the Rolls Royce dealer in San Francisco in 1966.
When I went back there in the seventies they were still doing it that way in 1978.
They scribed a line in the tire instead of a line on tape as Antonie does.
Anything between 1/16 th and a quarter inch is ok on a T.
The more camber the car has the more toe in you should give it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Sunday, June 03, 2018 - 09:10 am:

Antonie and Aaron this is the simplest and best way. Before we got the alignment machine at my shop this is the way we set the toe on ambulances. We have a tool that scribes the line on the tire like Aaron said and a bar with pointers to line up with the scribed lines. I used it to set toe on my friends and my Ts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, June 03, 2018 - 11:24 am:

To the top !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, June 03, 2018 - 11:06 pm:

Steve that is the type of tool I was talking about thanks for the post.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration