OT - 6-6-44 D-Day

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: OT - 6-6-44 D-Day
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 08:12 am:

Operation OVERLORD was in full swing along the beaches of Normandy 74 years ago today




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 08:49 am:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 09:20 am:

God bless all those brave persons...especially those who gave the ultimate sacrifice, and to those who, however few there are, still survive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond-Forest, Va on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 09:33 am:

Good men, ALL. Salute! I live about 12 miles from the WWII Memorial in Bedford, Va. I URGE any of you to visit if you are anywhere near when traveling.Bedford lost more men on D-Day than anywhere else in the country. The National Guard unit here suffered all the losses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 01:00 pm:

As an Army veteran, I really appreciate the bravery of these men and the many who died or were injured. God bless them all!

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 01:15 pm:

I watch that footage and wonder how anyone survived and wonder how I would have performed under the same conditions and would I have made it. Although I served, it was during peacetime, and I was never called upon to do what these men did. God bless them.

My wife's uncle (More of a father than her real father) was a D-Day vet. My son is an Iraq/Afghanistan vet. The two of them had a special bond that I know I will never be able to fully comprehend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Goddard Farmland, NJ on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 02:52 pm:

Todays generation just doesn't understand.
Thanks to ALL The Normandy/ vets all around the world.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 02:53 pm:

Last summer I had the privilege of escorting a Korean war vet(Jim Plymale)on an Honor Flight. It was a day I'll cherish for the rest of my life. Jim passed away just before Christmas.

I am writing this to recommend that any one knowing of a WWII era vet, a Korean war era vet or a Vietnam war era vet sign up for a Honor Flight. It is completely free for the vet. Not so free for the escort but so very very rewarding.

Just click on the below link or Google Honor Flight for more information.

https://www.honorflight.org/

Also a big thank you to all our veterans out there!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 04:58 pm:

I agree with Hal, As a former ground pounding Army veteran I'm certain that I would had moved forward with my fellow men but if by some chance I would had made it to cover I'm very sure I would not had to use the bathroom for quite some time. It was a historic waist of human life. I cant image what was going through there minds as they pushed forward into all the fire. I read somewhere that a lot of the men were suffering from sea sickness as they moved on the beaches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 05:08 pm:

Dale,I didn't see this thread when I started mine.Was not trying to hijack anything.
My appreciation to our forum member veterans of all conflicts and peacetime service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 05:24 pm:

Dale,I didn't see this thread when I started mine.Was not trying to hijack anything.
My appreciation to our forum member veterans of all conflicts and peacetime service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 05:28 pm:

That double post is the result of another confused, fouled(insert other word)up day here in paradise.
Those that have it,CHERISH your health and mobility.
Because when it goes,you may be at the mercy of some real bastards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 07:14 pm:

The bravery and courage of those that stormed the beaches and faced almost certain death are unfathomably inconceivable to me. But for that, I and my kids and grandkids and generations yet to come are forever eternally grateful.

I wish the kids would get their noses out of their phones and get themselves out of their self-serving egos and learn and appreciate the sacrifices that were made for them. (Not all the kids, but the majority.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 08:26 pm:

No problem Jim- I'd like to see a few more started on the subject!




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Anziani on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 10:36 pm:

My dad was there. He would hardly talk about it, but when he did, he would cry his eyes out


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 10:44 pm:

Having been on those beaches a few years ago, it seems to me that there had to be a better way. Those soldiers were sitting ducks fo the Germans on top of the cliffs.

Marty, don't write off the kids. We raised either them or their parents. They are being put to the test in the middle east today!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 10:50 pm:

My uncle, RIP, a tanker w/the 30th infantry arrived early, before H Hour and they drove that same Sherman thru Europe. Part of the Greatest Generation, God Bless them all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 11:16 pm:

Thank you guys.
My daughter and I visited the Arromanches, France area (Normandy) and the Musee Du Debarquement (http://www.arromanches-museum.com/accueil/index.php?lang=uk) several years ago.
Those kind folks are very proud of their museum and still very proud of the liberty our multi national fore-father's forces fought to regain for them and Europe.
For those of us that can/will think, it makes us think hard.
We visited the cemetery Dale shows above.
I wish we could have also visited a cemetery, supposedly with black crosses for the young men from Germany.
I found it. La Cambe War Cemetery. Much like our US cemetery, maintained by the German War Graves Commission.
I remember 2 things about traveling that area.
1. I marveled at the fact the French haven't cleaned it all up and scrapped the left over machinery. Exploring Point Du Hoc was also fascinating.
2. It was very sobering and shocking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, June 06, 2018 - 11:23 pm:

Thank you,Dale.
I hope I don't bore anyone with stories of the people I knew.I feel to talk about the things and the experiences they related to me somehow even at this date does good somehow.
A mechanic that worked for me,who I will name,Walter Unger of Wabash,Indiana.
He is the one I referred to one here ten or more years ago.Because he pulled the three digit '09 out of a building cellar in downtown Wabash, dragged it to the dealership and got it running.Circa 1950.He had a picture of him sitting in it with the motor number on the back,and that day's date.Displayed on the inside lid of his toolbox.
Kim Dobbins now owns that car.
The family has been unable to find that picture.
I KICK MY ASS still for not making copies of that when I could.DAMMIT.
Walt was a Master Seargent in a tank recovery and repair outfit.Heard bombs and artillery way..,.off in the distance.
The only sign of the Luftwaffe he ever saw was German pilot that intentionally bailed out of a perfectly good airplane from high altitude knowing winds aloft that day would blow him west over our lines.He was involved in watching him come down and picking him up.He'd had enough.
We used to drink beer in the shop after work.I kidded him one time about him having it pretty good compared to the guys on the line.Mistake.
I was informs in words the meaning and intent of,and in graphic,gut wrenching gory detail how the crews bodies were gotten out of a Sherman with an 88 hole in it so they could weld the holes shut,otherwise fix it and send it back for more with a new crew.
Made Fury damned hard to watch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Brancaccio - Calgary Alberta on Thursday, June 07, 2018 - 01:02 am:

Our grandson's great-great-grandfather, died 17 Dec 1944, only a few months from the war's end.

We visited there last month, Bergen Op Zoom cemetery Holland.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Thursday, June 07, 2018 - 02:16 am:

Chris,glad you were able to do that.
Many people in the U.S. have the Hollywood inspired notion that we here whipped the Axis single handedly.
Which irks me no end.
For instance, Canada,as a percentage of the pre war population had more war dead than the U.S.
And were involved longer,and in my opinion, overall, had it worse than our civilians,military and naval people.
Partly because they were subject to harsher restrictions.
Food,for instance,in England. Our people in England during the war ate so much better than the British military and civilian population it was an embarrassment to some of our people.
And an American soldier better not get caught sharing his rations with British civilians or military.
Because, as one of our guys told me,"it would be your ass if you got caught by the wrong people giving food away to some starving English woman and her kids".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Thursday, June 07, 2018 - 06:37 pm:

Ted, good point. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Saturday, June 09, 2018 - 06:23 pm:

About 12 years ago the bride and I visited France. We stayed with friends in Normandy. They found us an amazing guide named Karen. In France,tour guides must be licensed for the area that they act as guides. The test involves training and a test. Karen was licensed for France. Among other things she took us to Omaha beach. I stood over the beach where the Germans were entrenched, I said to her that "this is the perfect place to defend." She said that on the 10th anniversary of D-Day, an American general was speaking at the ceremonies and said that "This place is impossible to take from the sea, the reason that we were successful is that we did not know that." Heroes all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard C. Sullivan on Sunday, June 17, 2018 - 10:19 pm:

In Muskegon, Michigan is the LST 393 which is now a museum...I understand there are only 2 left in the world......Google LST 393.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, June 17, 2018 - 10:43 pm:

Chris, my family has one of those as well, but it's 27 years older....




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Sunday, June 17, 2018 - 10:53 pm:

It is documented that the water near the beaches were blood red. Our troops were being slaughtered but they kept on fighting knowing it was going to be suicide. Many of the soldiers were immigrants but willing to give their lives for our FREEDOM. If this younger generation could have seen what I experienced at Khe Sahn and afterwards the refer bldgs. were maxed out and bodies stacked like cord wood on wood pallets. My life from that point, FOREVER CHANGED !!! Freedom isn't free, someone paid for it with their life. I have the highest appreciation for all Combat Veterans and my Freedom. Semper Fi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 - 08:16 pm:

I'm a Gulf War vet...but consider myself a piker compared to the D-day guys.


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