New to T's and need radiator help.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: New to T's and need radiator help.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 01:34 am:

As I posted in the What have you done in June thread, my dad recently passed and I inherited his '26 T coupe and a '29 A "pickup" (started life as a Tudor sedan and cut down to a pickup). I have been driving the A but had left the T set in my shop since trailering it home a couple months ago. Finally got some time to go over the T and get it ready for a start. It's been 3 or 4 years since my dad drove it. After quite a bit of tinkering, a new battery, a stuck float valve and several tries at turning it over I got it to start and seems to run good. The one thing I found that my dad didn't get to was fixing the radiator filler neck. The threaded cup that the motometer screws into has completely separated from the neck. He had a temp fix of some 2 part putty to get by. Has anyone got any experience with this happening? It's a plain brass neck and I didn't know if the cup could be soldered on or if I need to replace entire filler neck? Thanks everyone and I look forward to spending some time on here sharing and picking brains for help!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 01:41 am:

You may be able to but Id suggest ordering the neck from one of the vendors and have a older radiator shop solder it on. They will have the right torch and solder to quickly repair it. Some folks say that the weight of the motor meter it pretty tough on the filler necks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 01:42 am:



(Message edited by nick620 on June 08, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 01:46 am:

Thanks John! I remember my dad telling me I would have to a get a neck specific to 1926 and 27 models but I have yet to find any supporting information from the usual supply websites. Any idea of that was true?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 01:56 am:

1929 A - My 16yr old son driving it to prom. Best pic I had.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 02:02 am:

The above pic is our 1929 A. My 16yr old son drove it to prom. Best pic I had. Sorry still getting used to this site formatting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 02:54 am:

Nick, your neck is beyond reasonable redemption. A new one MAY be the answer. When I bought a new Brassworks radiator for my roadster, the neck was in the wrong place and had to be shifted to fit the shell. The extra problem I had was the original cap would only go on about one turn before binding on the thread. It took quite some effort with a thread file to be able to get a cap to screw right in. Rather than file the cap I put all the work into the neck, so other caps/dogbones would still fit.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 06:10 am:

Nick - your Model A is a 1930. She may be titled as a 29, but shes definitely a 30. Nice looking truck too - was pretty common during the later years of the Depression and especially during WW2 (when all vehicle production was for the war effort), to turn an old sedan into a truck when one was needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 06:38 am:

I would just clean the area well and JB Weld it back on. I used at least 1/2 a pound of the stuff just messing about with my old radiator a month or so ago as an experiment. Many miles later it's still holding and working well. A bit of paint hides the stuff well.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/822076/864907.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 08:57 am:

Solder or JB Weld might be OK with a stock cap, but I wouldn't trust them to bear the weight of a Motometer with the vibration of just normal driving.

That aftermarket radiator my be OK, but chances are it's not. If the car overheats and cleaning the cooling system doesn't cure it, my suggestion would be to bite the financial bullet and buy a new Berg's. Maybe you want to leave the neck alone until you find out whether the radiator still radiates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 10:13 am:

Looks like you have an aftermarket radiator on the T. Good chances are the stock neck would work. There might be a little more work involved in replacing it. Sometimes the necks are installed from the backside, so the back plate might have to come off to get the old one out. If yours has a lip around the neck that you can see form the top, then you should be able to unsolder and replace. I think the new ones are made with a curved under area that acts as a stop/seat for installing from the out side. I don't see a new neck listed at Lang's or Snyder's (on line catalog) and Mac's show as discontinued. If that is the case and you want to replace, you might have to find a used and abused radiator to take one off. The neck would be the same from 1917 to 1927.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 10:36 am:

I agree with Ron - it's a '30 A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 12:38 pm:

I also feel that your rad. neck is not repairable and usable considering that you have a motormeter to go on it.

As Mark G. said above, new necks for your radiator are not listed in Lang's, Snyder's and other catalogs. I did see them listed in Chaffin's catalog for $74.95, which might be overkill for your car.

I have a junk radiator with a solid neck and would be willing to unsolder the neck and give it to you if you'd like. Any radiator shop could solder it onto your radiator easily.

Let me know if you'd like it. My email is cgumbinger@att.net

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 08:58 pm:

Here is the radiator. Its interesting that their are no tubes and fins just flat tubes that are crinkled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 09:18 pm:

Thanks Keith! That is very generous! I may take you up on that. I need to weigh my options first and see which way I should go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nick Miller on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 09:26 pm:

On my Model A I know my dad pieced it together starting with a hedge row car. I did a little more research and the rad shell is '30 but it appears to have '31 running boards and splash guard but fuel shutoff is still in cab indicating '30. Also has late '30/31 instrument cluster. Running boards and splash guard appear original for frame so it's either a '30 cab on '31 frame or was a late '30 car that got '31 style running boards of that was even possible. Either way have no clue why its titled a '29! Great catch guys thanks!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 09:51 pm:

Nick, You have an after market "Honeycomb" radiator which is different than the usual fins and tubes.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C west central, MN on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 11:25 pm:

Nice lookin' Fords!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 11:41 pm:

RE: that model A, yes, the ribbed type speedo dash came in mid '30. Pickup splashshields were two piece even on '31s, and the running boards were diamond metal, your are passenger car ones, probably from when it was s tudor. So, I would guess mid to late '30 production. Honey comb radiators can cool very well, if they're in good condition. I think you could put water in the radiator, up to the neck, and then silver-solder the top of the neck back on Sil-Floss would do the job, and it would be stronger than it was originally. You will have to clean the area down to the "virgin metal" for this process. The water should keep the base cool enough that it doesn't unsolder from the tank. BTW, it does look like your neck was made in two pieces to begin with!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, June 08, 2018 - 11:47 pm:

Nick, that type of core is an aftermarket replacement. It may have been fitted into Ford tanks, or may be a whole radiator replacement. If it is the latter, a new neck could still need some fettling to get it to fit.

hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, June 14, 2018 - 07:58 am:

I solder parts like that back on when I can. Sometimes wrapped in copper or brass wire with extra solder soaked in to stiffen it up a bit.


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