Rim lug broke off

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Rim lug broke off
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 06:31 pm:

Rim lug broke off a 21 inch split rim. Can they be weled back on?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 06:38 pm:

I have done several. I bolt the rim onto a wheel using the other 3 and make sure the one you are welding is spaced out the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 06:45 pm:

Luckily I now see the tabs are still fine and it's fits snugly in the tab holes. Should be a 5 minute job. Now have to find someone with a welder...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 07:03 pm:

John, with due respect, if you are into T's you should be for a welder, not someone WITH a welder. You will find all sorts of uses for it. And then, of course you will need a grinder.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 07:23 pm:

Only do it from the inside with the tire removed where the tabs fit into the rim. Welding on any rim with a tire installed and on the outside of the rim can cause excessive tire pressure and an explosion when the air pressure raises and the tire removes itself from the rim. I would NEVER weld a rim with a mounted tire.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 08:05 pm:

Tim, of course! It's removed. I would never do anything like that...

Allan, I know, I'll get one at some point...just don't have any space at the moment. All my T parts are laying around! :-)

A friend has one and will get it done this week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 08:18 pm:

I just had one done on a Chevy rim with the notched lug. My friend, also, welded up the Chevy valve stem hole and put one where it should be. Can't tell it from a T rim, now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 11:34 pm:

Terry, do the lugs on the Chev rim sit a bit further off the outside face of the felloe? The Chev rims are wider than T rims by around 3/8", and I was wondering if this is reflected in the fit of the rims on Ford felloes.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 11:39 pm:

John,keep in mind that even with the lug not securely art,ached to that rim,if need be,they lug will still keep the tire/rim from parting company with the wheel....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 11:44 pm:

And,if done by "tacking" quickly a couple different spots,with a cooldown,you can avoid demounting the tire.
Done it many times,30", and split rims.
But,once upon a time,I had advanced training as a welder.
Others results may vary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 06:07 am:

Jim, I'll keep that in mind. Since a friend has a welder, may as well get it done right!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 07:04 pm:

Happened again with another rim! :-(

Just bought a rim spreader. Never going to use the turnbuckle way again. Too much pressure on those lugs. One rim was fine and two had lugs ripped off with this method.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 08:14 pm:

Happened again with another rim! :-(

Just bought a rim spreader. Never going to use the turnbuckle way again. Too much pressure on those lugs. One rim was fine and two had lugs ripped off with this method.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 08:15 pm:

Sorry for the double post guys. Don't know what happened...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 09:36 pm:

No professional (advanced training?) will ever touch a rim with a tire mounted with a welder.

The lugs are attached INSIDE and welding on the outside edge will look like an amateur bird poop farm repair.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 07:55 pm:

Tim, I've welded on many rims (not T' rims) with tires mounted, they don't get anywhere near hot enough to blow a tire. Tires get way hotter being driven at highway speeds. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 08:30 pm:

Well, one rim had no tire and one rim has a tire installed. We will see what happens. If I had my rim spreader delivered I'd take it off but I don't...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 09:12 pm:

I don't believe they were ever welded it appears that they were forged in place. Welding hard steel is only a temporary fix as the arc weld will not penetrate hard steel. Forged lugs were a very substantial means and should last a life time. Check and see if yours were welded in the first place, they may have been fabricated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Annaian - Moultonborough NH on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 09:21 pm:

I had been suspecting they were not welded! They seem to be forged, as you said. No evidence of a weld at all. Almost like they were just pressed in.

These are ford demountable split rims 21". Maybe its different with others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 09:51 pm:

Yes Dave I am sure you have but remember this is a public posting area where people may think this is fine to do and possibly get hurt or killed. My choice is to say not weld a rim with a tire on it. If you want to accept responsibility and advise this is a safe method then proceed at your risk and not mine.

Pull the damn tire off and fix it right, don't catch the tire on fire and burn the house down and the car also. Welding, air pressure and rubber don't all go together well.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 10:19 pm:

Those lugs were staked in the rim, a form of riveting. these can be easily welded on the inside as Tim suggests. Arc welding will 'penetrate' the 'hard' steel, just don't overdo the amperage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 11:42 pm:

What Tim says only 15 times stronger!!! REMOVE THE TIRE!!! before welding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 02:32 am:

Well fellows, you have to use your head when doing this. You don't weld near any rubber (don't weld on tube type rims or near the beads) and let the air out of the tire first. JMHO Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 02:38 am:

My neighbour of 86 years and has been a welder most of his life and I requested of him to weld hardened steel for me and he said that hardened steel cannot be welded I also have a Studebaker car and the bumper support irons (hard steel) were welded at the factory for convenience not for strength to reduce the chance of the parts becoming separated. With the bumper removed and then the irons removed as a matched pair and they are welded together. The factory weld did not penetrate the hard steel, with a slight bump the two parts separated very easily and the spot where the weld was attached was no penetration, just attached at the surface only. I would expect that said factory welders were of the highest quality and their welds would not penetrate the hard steel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 03:04 am:

Bumper irons are spring steel, which doesn't weld easily. I have seen lugs repaired by welding, they are not spring steel, or they wouldn't have been swagged into the rim originally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:19 am:

These loose lugs may be torch brazed if you don't have a MIG welder. Regardless of method used to repair, make sure the lug is straight and fully seated in the rim to maintain bolt location. This may require some reshaping of the dovetail on the staked area of the lug and some straightening/grinding/filing of the rim area and hole where the lug was pulled out. Make sure lug is straight and fully seated into the rim before you weld/braze so the wheel will run true after the fix. best, jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 12:25 pm:

I would agree that the lugs are not spring (hardened) steel but the rim is hard steel, you have to address both components. The arc may penetrate the lug but not the rim. If a rim is bent it is most difficult if not impossible to straighten back to true. Strike an arc on a rim and see what happens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Denny Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 01:01 pm:

You could use duct tape, after all some airlines use it to hold planes together!


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