Adjusting valve lifters 3 nuts????

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Adjusting valve lifters 3 nuts????
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 07:34 pm:

I recently bought a Model T that has adjustable valve lifters. Valves are adjusted around .011, except #5 is at .045. I have the 3 wrenches for doing the valve adjustment, but no information on what the 3 nuts are and how to actually adjust the valve by turning the 3 nuts. What is the procedure? The head is off and the pistons are out. Will I need to remove the exhaust and intake manifolds to do the adjustment?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 07:42 pm:

One is made onto the lifter. You just use it to hold the lifter still. The other two...one is the part you want to run up and down. The other is just a lock nut. Loosen the lock nut. Make your adjustment. Tighten lock nut making sure not to upset the adjustment. Verify the adjustment is still correct after tightening locknut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 07:43 pm:

Keith-
One wrench holds the tappet in place, the top one adjusts the gap, and the one just below it is a lock nut for the adjuster.

Be sure to use all three of your hands.

: ^ )

-Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Sunday, June 10, 2018 - 08:31 pm:

Keith and Hal, thank you. Now I understand what the system is and I will have fun trying it with only 2 hands.
What I did today was scrape old inspection plate gasket off the bottom of the pan, painted the head, head bolts, one valve cover I have off the engine, and varnished the steering wheel with a maple color varnish.
Tomorrow I go get a marriage license and then I will try adjusting the valve. It is best to do the easy things first.
The lady I will marry holding my first granddaughter.
The lady in question with my granddaughter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 05:22 am:

Congfats!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 01:26 pm:

1. Take off manifolds.
2. Remove valve springs.
3. Make sure cam is at the heal.
4. Put feeler gauge in gap.
5. If you can turn valve the gap is too small.
6. If you cannot turn the valve the gap is too large.
7. Move cam to toe so that tappet is up and you can make the adjustment.
8. Hold tappet and loosen lock nut.
9. Turn adjustment screw at top while holding tappet.
10. Tighten lock nut.
11. Repeat at 3 until correct.

While you are at it check the condition of the valves and lap or re-grind as necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 03:19 pm:

Neil - Excellent step by step instructions, however, unless I misunderstand something here, I think you might have step #5 and step #6 reversed. For someone inexperienced in adjusting valve lash, it might be well to add a footnote to your instructions as a second method for determining correct valve lash, however, typical of me, my explanation is probably much too "wordy". However, I can't think of a more brief way to explain how to determine correct valve lash. I'd probably say something like,....if you can feel a very slight ("VERY SLIGHT") resistance in sliding the correct size feeler gage in and out of clearance space ("GAP") you have attained the proper clearance. If applying downward pressure to the head of the valve does not increase the resistance in sliding the feeler gage in and out, you have too much clearance or "gap". If the downward pressure on the head of the valve increases the resistance in sliding the feeler gage in and out, you still don't have enough gap. If the downward pressure on the valve just very slightly increases resistance to sliding in and out movement of the proper size feeler gage, the clearance (or gap) is perfect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Monday, June 11, 2018 - 07:40 pm:

Harold,

Very good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:01 am:

Neil or Harold- I'm curious why the valve springs need to be removed before adjusting the clearance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:21 am:

I got the #5 valve adjusted yesterday. It was a bit of a hassle but not too bad. I did not need to remove the intake manifold or the valve springs. Just turn the adjuster, check, turn the adjuster again, check, turn... and then tighten the lock nut and do a final check.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:33 am:

Iím surprised no one here mentioned that there might be a reason for that large clearance on that one valve...

It might be possible that the engine has a worn cam and someone in the past had timed the valves by piston position to smooth it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 11:22 am:

Removing the valve springs just makes the job easier. The gap can be tested by seeing if the valve turns. It also means that instead of turning the cam to the toe to lift the lifter, the lifter can be lifted without having to turn the cam. This is in contrast to the instructions I gave earlier. You have to lift the lifter to get to the flats on the lifter so that you can unlock the locking nut. I actually use needle noise Vicegrip pliers on the flats of the lifter to keep it from turning and hold it up. This all assumes that the head is off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 02:55 pm:

Well, I made a mistake and adjusted the lock nut tight against the upper nut. I realized that last night so today I went out and turned the lock nut so it would go down against the lifter. It never tightened. Then I took a look at the end of the valve and saw that the upper part of the lifter screw was not lined up with the end of the valve. It seems that the threaded screw part of the lifter had broken a while back and that is the reason the valve was out of adjustment. Now I need to remove the cam, get the lifter out, get the bottom part of the broken screw out and then get it back together. While waiting for parts I will keep sanding and buffing the paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 03:36 pm:

You do not have to remove the cylinder head unless you are grinding the valves.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration