1919 Fordson Model F restoration is almost complete! :-)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: 1919 Fordson Model F restoration is almost complete! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mitch Taylor on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 - 07:02 pm:

Now I know it's not a Model T, but it is based on a Model T in many ways...
The Fordson Model F was Henry Ford's first production tractor.

See the engine running for the first time in decades! ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQMT2Oryobs

The Fordson Model F was completed in 1916 and was the first lightweight, mass produced tractor in the world, making it possible for the average farmer to own a tractor for the first time.

The name Fordson was used for two reasons. The "Ford Tractor" name was already being used by a company in Minneapolis. In addition, the Ford Motor Company shareholders had no interest in tractor production, so Henry Ford started an independent company for building tractors, named Henry Ford & Son.

Here's a basic outline of what had to be done...

Remove and repair fuel tank, which had rust holes underneath. The larger holes were successfully welded up at Lee’s Welding Workshop in Taree.
Smaller holes in the fuel tank were patched up using Magic Metal or “QuickSteel”.
The fuel tank was then sand blasted and a coat of primer applied. It was then de-rusted inside, and lined with a lining solution (KBS Gold Standard Tank Sealer), which was rolled around for an hour or so then let it cure for a few days.
There was a large hole in the engine block (due to water freezing in England) which was repaired by Mayric Engineering in Taree, steel plate was cut to shape and brazed into the hole.
The block still had some cracks from the brazing process (which leaked water!), which were metal stitched.
All the welsh plugs were replaced due to bad corrosion, and thus water leaks everywhere!
The steering wheel has been repainted and the timber has a fresh coat of lacquer.
The metal faces on both the exhaust/intake manifold and the vaporizer had pitting and slight warping, causing an air leak, which meant the engine would only run with full choke. Both surfaces were machined back to perfectly flat, to ensure a good seal.
The cast iron petrol starting tank had a crack, which was ground out, repaired with Magic Metal or “QuickSteel”, and then painted.
A new coil-box cover was sourced, and a brand new set of trembler coils installed.
All the wiring has been replaced, including timing wires, spark plug wires and battery wiring.
New linkages for the throttle and choke were fabricated and installed.
The head gasket was replaced.
The timing was out by 90 degrees, and was reset to make it fire just on Top Dead Centre on compression.
New copper fuel lines were fashioned by a member of Taree Historic Motor Club.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Weir Atascadero on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 01:01 am:

Lookin Gud!!!

Sincerely

Jim Weir


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 09:38 am:

I know a guy who is selling a Fordson F. Someone did a cosmetic restoration a couple decades ago. Still looks sort of presentable. He says its a 1919, but I suspect it is a 22-24. Not exactly sure how to date it or what it is worth and what to even think about offering. Besides,I have enough stuff to work on and not sure if tractors are my "thing".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 09:46 am:

I pulled one out of the weeds close by my house a number of years ago. It was a later model with rubber wheels made in Dagenham and imported to the US. Was going to restore it, but got busy with other things and sold it - not sure what happened to it, hope it got done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 01:20 pm:

Good for you Mitch ! I applaud your enthusiasm and description of the steps you took to bring this historic tractor back to life. However, and respectfully writing, I learned that the very few 1918 models and all the much larger 1919 production models had the “ladder side” cast iron radiator sides and the rear fenders were introduced in 1924. I ve restored and driven a 1919 and recently completed a 1922 Fordson. The newly babbited and piston ringed engine is so tight that I’m waiting for a friend to finish his hay season and pull start me. Thank you for the audio


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis R on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 03:05 pm:

For what its worth, some may disagree- This is what the ancient / old guy I bought my Fordson from told me- Never pull start Fordson with a worm drive rear end, you're taking a chance of shooting the worm gear out the (tractors) rear end. There is a Fordson near my home that has an aftermarket rear end that is a ring and pinion set on it. May have to see if I can work a deal for it...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Grisbee---Cheyenne Wyo on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 03:08 pm:

If you want to see a pretty rare Fordson,there is a crawler in the Wyman Living History Museum in Craig,Colorado. It wouldn't pass OSHA requirements today with the driver sitting down partially between the tracks and no guards. He'd want to keep his bib overalls strapped up pretty tight with no loose ends dangling out anywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Kahle on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 05:14 pm:

I own somewhere in the neighborhood of 35 Fordson model F and model N tractors and have restored about a half dozen of them. I have every year from 1918 to 1927 model F and a like new 1935 model N. Since it has been a while since I did my homework, my memory is a little cloudy but I am almost certain that the ladder side radiators continued through the entire 1919 model year and the rear wheels in 1918 and most of 1919 only had six spokes. Also, the 1919 carburetor and manifold would have been a Holley model 234 - the one pictured is a later Kingston model. My restored 1919 can be seen on youtube under "1919 snowmobile" as well as a setup I constructed to use compressed air to break in a new engine rebuild on a 1926.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 06:03 pm:

I, too, thought all early Fordsons (at least the first year) had the ladder side radiator. Also, somewhere I thought that I read the most early production went to Russia on a Lend-Lease, or was that TT trucks?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 06:22 pm:

I have four of them, Makes a T collection complete.
Dennis. you may be correct, but I have towed them a couple of times and they survived, maybe I got lucky. I did tow them in high gear slowly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 07:16 pm:

Just this morning I read a post about a Fordson F tractor on another forum I watch and it is interesting as the tractor has a brass tag that reads "Made in Irish Free State"...

http://www.yesterdaystractors.com/cgi-bin/viewit.cgi?bd=ford&th=649880

I have had a couple of Ford Model T tractor conversions and they were fun but what I really enjoy is my "Golden Jubilee" 50th anniversary tractor of the FOMCO but mine is serial number NAA 00018, the earliest known Golden Jubilee. I feel a little bad that I plow snow with it and mow the yard each week with the rear mount finish mower! It is parked inside and is well taken care of now that I own it.

I like your yard art!

Regards,

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 07:18 pm:

OOPS, yours is not "yard art", the other one is. Glad you got yours going and have fun!

Tim Moore


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