Age of Frame

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Age of Frame
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jed Welsh on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:50 am:

We just bought our first model T. The engine is a 1920. For the missing gas tank there are three holes in the frame for mounting the tank. Two on the door side and one on the drivers side. Is this standard on all frames? Or does this indicate certain years? Is there any way to tell what year the frame and body were made?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 10:55 am:

Yes that is standard for all under seat tanks. Steel U channel or forged running board support/irons? Pictures? They have to be 250KB or smaller to post here. Welcome to the forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 11:20 am:

application/pdfpic
Model_T_Frame_Identification_Chart_V2-356806.pdf (37.1 k)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 04:09 pm:

FWIW, the change to the pressed steel running board support brackets was proposed and first drawn on Aug. 14, 1917. Of course they didn't appear in production until considerably later; early in calendar 1920 I believe. My April '20 car has them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 06:58 pm:

R V A, Also FWIW. Nearly a third of all the model T frames I have had in the past too many years, were drilled (punched?) by the factory for both types of running board brackets. Most of those had the earlier forged brackets originally. So it would seem to me that the time between the proposal and the implementation was longer than usual. I agree, I have yet to see a confirmed correct car or chassis with the later rolled/pressed brackets before early 1920. I have seen a '21 with forged brackets still. Of course, I cannot swear it couldn't have been changed at some time in the past. I have seen quite a lot of '19s and '20s with forged brackets and holes in the frame for the later style.

It is amazing that something as simple as a model T frame could have so many minor detail changes. A true expert (I am not quite there yet!) could probably look at any frame and narrow it down to barely over two years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - 08:48 pm:

On our Canadian sourced cars, the forged running board supports ran into the 1921. Generally accepted that the pressed metal U shaped one piece fixtures were introduced on the 1922 models.

Once the starter and generator were fitted the rails were drilled/punched for the battery bracket. Of interest is the fact that both rails are drilled with 3 holes, so the brackets can be reversed for RHD and LHD cars. Likewise, the rails are drilled on both sides for the steering bracket also, and the starter switch.
When you think about it, the battery carrier can never be swapped from one side to the other because the exhaust pipe gets in the way. It is believed that all the holes were drilled into flat blanks prior to the rails being formed into their U shape.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, June 14, 2018 - 11:07 am:

Interesting how the Canadian cars were ahead of the US cars in some ways but behind in others. My late Dad's original '23 Canadian coupe is a very late '23, within a couple weeks of being a '24, yet it has the earlier, tulip body with suicide doors. It also has the ribbed pedals, which were gone from US cars by '16.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, June 14, 2018 - 12:08 pm:

Ribbed pedals make more sense. Would help keep your foot from sliding off when wet. I've never had that happen! LOL :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jed Welsh on Wednesday, June 20, 2018 - 11:19 am:

Thanks everyone for your input. Especially Mark Gregush and Mark Strange. Jed


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