Drive shaft bearing sleeve installation

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Drive shaft bearing sleeve installation
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Hanson on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 03:32 pm:

I am replacing a worn driveshaft bearing sleeve onto a new driveshaft. I tried heating the sleeve to 600 deg and cooling the shaft with dry ice, got the sleeve about 1 inch' before it froze into position (about 3 inches shy of its final position.) Is my new sleeve destroyed? and any ideas how to get the sleeve on properly here in Portland Oregon? I am a bit stuck.
thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Coyle on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 04:11 pm:

Matthew, I have never changed one. I am not sure but believe heating the hardened sleeve that much will most likely temper or change the properties (hardness) of the steel. I copied this from Wikipedia on tempering steel.

Tempering in the range of 260 and 340 C (500 and 644 F) causes a decrease in ductility and an increase in brittleness, and is referred to as the "tempered martensite embrittlement" (TME) range.

Hopefully someone who knows more about this will chime in. It may not hurt in this case, but for the amount of work involved to dig into it once it's installed on the car I would get a different one.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Humble Northern Michigan on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 05:32 pm:

I heated my sleeve in the oven to about 400 deg, left it in for an hour or so. With the drive shaft at room temp, drove it on with a deep socket and large hammer as fast as i could. One chance to get the key to line up. Think i may have bought 2 sleeves in case i didnt get it on my first try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Anderson on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 06:06 pm:

I used a 50 ton press. Went right on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 07:01 pm:

I used a BFH. Went right on . . . with a struggle!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 07:07 pm:

I just knock them on with a hammer but make sure the notch is lined up with the keyway or you'll have to knock it back off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 07:20 pm:

I'm pretty sure pressing them on is better. Seems the notch always wants to wander a little when they're pounded on. I had to open the notch a wee bit with a die grinder to clear the woodruff key.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry K. Lee on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 07:24 pm:

Matthew, Bill is correct on that much temperature range. Are you seeing any "blueing" on the hard sleeve? If you are I would sure hate for you to go down the road only to find it went "Crunch". Pressing in is the best way, a lot of pressure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, June 18, 2018 - 07:44 pm:

Join the Rose City Model T Club. We have the tool to pull and install the sleeve in our club tools along with others. google Rose City Model T Club. And welcome to the forum! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Hanson on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 - 01:38 pm:

Thanks to everyone for the information. I will certainly be looking into the Rose City Model T club for tools and recommendations.

I had read in the repair manual about beating the sleeve on the shaft, had tried that a little, and hoped there was a better way. I like the press on method, but could not find a hydraulic press tall enough - at least not yet. I will let you know when the sleeve is on and things are going together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hobart Akin on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 - 04:46 pm:

I have had luck heating the sleeve in motor oil on the stove using a candy thermometer to 300 -350 degrees. The oil will help uniformly heat the sleeve and allow you to transport it to where your are working. Careful with hot oil. I have been able to slip the sleeve on with the oil acting as a lubricant. Do not tell your wife you used her candy thermometer.!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 - 04:47 pm:

The other option. Use a Fun Projects kit with the tapered and ball bearings. No pressing, no heating. Makes life a lot simpler.


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