Old Photo - My Roadster then and now

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old Photo - My Roadster then and now
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 08:31 am:

I have known for decades that my Model T was in our family for decades and this is the oldest photo I have seen. The woman on the running board is my grandmother’s sister Katie. The car was passed down through the family and now it’s mine. It led a rough life having been converted to a farm truck until two of my uncles restored it back to a roadster. This photo was taken in the late ‘30’s. Katie died during childbirth in 1937.


Here is Tilly today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrett on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 08:57 am:

Mark,
Really charming story about your car and the family ties to it. It's great that you inherited such a neat piece of family history. As I thought about how your family cherished their Lizzie, it occurred to me that the admiration they demonstrated by passing it down to other family members is a trait that may be lost to succeeding generations. Can you imagine that same affection being bestowed on a Prius or a Camry?! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 09:01 am:

Great to have a "family" car. Your great aunt Kate reminds me of my wife's aunt who was born in '09. I guess it is the clothing and hair do since they were probably about the same age. Nice car, nice old picture and thanks for posting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 09:28 am:

I would bet most of our T's have led a rough life. Yours looks none the worse for wear after plenty of massaging and love :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 09:52 am:

I don't think that my '27 did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 10:04 am:

I like to see side curtains, especially original ones. It's good to see the one on this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 12:49 pm:

Mark,

I like the old picture of your car. That is really neat to have of family members with a car that is still around.

My early 27 Roadster has an engine production date of Sept 24 1926. It has wood spoked wheels and a nickel plated radiator shell. I have always assumed they were original, can't imagine anyone changing from wires to wood, though some people tell me the wheels should be the wire type if it's a 27.

Judging from the old picture, your car had wood wheels from the factory so I was wondering if you could tell me the production date (in lieu of telling me your serial number) to see if it's anywhere near mine.

Did it have a nickel plated radiator shell originally? It looks like it in the picture.

Congratulations on a beautiful restoration!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 01:35 pm:

Eric. My car was made mid-September of '26. I don't know how to nail down an actual production date. Maybe that's in Bruce's book. If I interpolate, I get Sept 17. The old photo shows a nickel shell but my uncle found a non-plated replacement. He found many replacement parts in swap meets. I didn't think that wire wheels were widely available until January '27 but I'm not the expert here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 01:53 pm:

I have read that wire wheels were standard on closed cars


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, June 22, 2018 - 09:48 pm:

Mark,

Great story and photos. My Grandparents on my Dad's side never owned a new car that I am aware of. They had several Model Ts but they were all acquired second hand. Times were hard for them in Arkansas even before the depression hit.

But if you happen to know if your relatives bought the car new in their area, you can probably figure out which Ford Branch Plant assembled your car. See the distribution map at the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/102533.html

Bruce McCalley's book "Model T Ford" has a wealth of good information. Many of the written parts are included in the on-line Encyclopedia at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/intro.htm His book and the 2 CD version of the book has lots of photos to help us better understand what the text is describing. I highly recommend the CD version as it has updates that Bruce continued to add as well as color photos rather than all black and white photos as the book was printed. See the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/822076/844722.html for information about the CDs, what they contain, and how they can be ordered.

And for wheels at: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/U-Z.htm#wheels the online version has:

1926

2800A1 291J Front 30x3-1/2 Non-demountable (1926)
2800I 291H Front 21” Balloon, black (1925-1927)
2800J 291I Front 21” Balloon, natural (1925-1927)
2814F2 7698H Rear 30x3-1/2 Non-demountable (1926)
2814N2 2815J Rear 21” Balloon, black (1926-1927)
2814P2 2815M Rear 21” Balloon, natural (1926-1927)
2881 2846 Front/Rear, 21” Wire (1926-1927)
Early production continued the options available in 1925 but the 30 x 3-1/2 (all around) demountable wheels became standard after a short time, then the 21” wheels with demountable rims became standard. 21” wood wheels were the same as 1925 except for the 11” rear brake drums. Wire wheels, introduced in January 1926 in black only at first, then in several colors, became optional. These used the same 21” tires as the wooden balloon wheels. New hub caps, nickel-plated steel, were used with the wire wheels.

1927

Standard wheels were the 21” demountables, with the wire wheels an option. Wire wheels became standard equipment in the last production on closed cars beginning in late 1926. Black was the supplied color; other colors were special order or dealer-installed options.

So based on a mid-Sept date for a car both of them would have come from the factory with wood rather than the wire wheels that were introduced as an accessory in Jan. But any owner could have purchased the accessory wire wheels and hubs and had the dealer install.

Concerning Bruce's listing of the engine serial numbers on page 501 of his book, he states:

"The author cannot stress too strongly that care must be used when attempting to accurately date a car by its engine number. Remember that the dates shown are those when the engine assembly was completed, not the car, or the date a block of engine number records were shipped to another assembly plant."

For anyone that would like an explanation of why I believe a 1926-27 would most likely not have been assembled on the date listed in Bruce’s daily engine serial number log please see the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/708324/722800.html?1486387604

Again, it is great to have a T with so much history of your family connected to the car.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, June 23, 2018 - 09:02 am:

Thanks for the information guys.
Hap, that is some interesting information regarding the lag time from engine assembly to car assembly. I need to completely reread my copy of Bruce McCalley's book. There's so much to know about these cars and time isn't making it any easier as my memory becomes more "selective".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Barcelona area (Spain) on Saturday, June 23, 2018 - 11:42 am:

Took a look at your links Hap, and since there are color pictures and a bunch more information in the Model T Encyclopedia, I have just ordered a copy for myself.

This forum really is the greatest thing since sliced bread :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, June 23, 2018 - 12:11 pm:

For Eric,

With over 15,000,000 T's there is still so much to learn. I'm sure you will enjoy the CD version with the additional items it contains. And I probably should have worded the earlier sentence that it contains "some color photos." Many of the photos Bruce had were black and white so they remain black & white. But others that were printed in the "Vintage Ford" as well as Bruce's book were taken in color. For many of those Bruce still had the color photo and so he scanned the color one to put in his CD version.

For Mark,

If you run across any additional early photos of your Roadster, please post them also.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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