Does this sound right?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Does this sound right?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Banks on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 02:53 pm:

https://youtu.be/UQ6Z7CAManA

Is there something that wears out in there that needs replaced? The Ford manual didn't mention anything unless I'm missing it. Sorry about the sound of running water, I'm draining the radiator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darryl Bobzin on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 02:57 pm:

The ball at the end of the wishbone should be 1 1/4" in diameter. The ball cap and the housing on the engine pan can also ware.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 04:11 pm:

Bob Bergstadt makes shims to tighten up those worn caps. The socket can also be welded up, and recut with a burr. For my cars, I find a pan that isn't worn bad, and file the cap down until I get a good fit, and then pack it with fiberous wheel bearing grease. Steve Coniff did an article on welding the socket up about 10 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 04:15 pm:

Not good, the ball should be able to pivot in the socket without any free play. You can find a better wishbone, or repair what you have:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/463881.html?1406223314

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/476084.html?1410619617

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/36800.html?1191983186

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/239526.html?1318031604


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 04:41 pm:

I'm not sure that it would help, but the cap appears to be moving up and down as the ball moves. The correct way to attach the cap is with studs threaded at both ends with springs below the cap and castle nuts under the springs. The springs hold the cap up against the crankcase and the cap would not move up and down. The nuts are wired so that neither the studs nor the nuts will come loose. If the wear is not too great you can cut a piece of hard leather to go inside the cap to hold the ball from moving up and down. Sometimes a new cap will fix the problem. If the wear is greater, you would need to weld up and grind down as posted by Larry Smith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 05:23 pm:

Here's how the cap assembly should look. Be sure to wire the studs together after tightening the castle nuts so that the studs can't back out of the blind holes in the pan socket. :-)


pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Banks on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 05:46 pm:

Thanks all. Mark, you're correct, I don't have those springs, but the cap is drawn down flush against the plate so the springs wouldn't do anything I wouldn't think. I'll drop the radius rod and see what the damage is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - 06:01 pm:

My understanding is that the cap being flush on the plate is another indicator of wear - If the ball and sockets were spec size there would be a small gap between them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 08:26 am:

This is what I need to fix on my car. Is this repairable? The cap is in good condition.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 10:49 am:

Mark,

Lang's sells new old stock sockets. Part number 2737N or 2737BN depending on the year of your car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 10:58 am:

Mark,
You are in for a big job! If it were mine, I would first look for a better wishbone with a smooth ball which is not worn very much. Second would look for a better crankcase. If that's on your 26, they are quite easy to find for that year. If you wish to weld in and re-grind the existing crankcase, you should remove it from the block anyway, which would involve pulling the engine. So either way you would need to pull it.

While it's out is a good time to go through the engine and transmission and magneto to fix anything else which is worn or needs adjustment. Reline the bands etc. And straighten the crankcase. You might look for someone near you who has experience to help you or lead you to a machinist who can do the job right.

I know this sounds like a lot of work, but could save a lot more work if you fix everything which would require removal of the engine so that you won't need to do it again soon.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Thompson Graham NC on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 11:04 am:

mine was not that bad but i beat a wheat penny
flat on my anvil then shaped it over the ball worked great. philip


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Nunn on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 01:01 pm:

I've been on the lookout for a new crankcase since I don't want to try to replace the socket. Repairing the socket would be difficult too. It has already been brazed once. At least the ball on my wishbone is round, although rough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 - 03:18 pm:

Heavy metal shim curved to match the ball, huge glob of epoxy metal goo on the upper crankcase socket, put ball in place and affix cap. Wait 12 hours, remove cap, apply grease, reapply cap and enjoy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Banks on Saturday, June 30, 2018 - 03:49 pm:

Does the shim go on top or on the bottom.?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 30, 2018 - 06:07 pm:

Mike Walker did 'repair' to worn socket on the crankcase by enlarging the worn socket even more with grinding.

Then he fitted a new cap, upside down and ground some to mate with the 'prepared' socket. J-B Weld the parts together.

After set of the epoxy, he refitted the ball of the wishbone into the new 'socket' made from that reversed cap, and placed a second cap over, added the springs and nuts, and he 'repaired' the old worn socket without welding.

Neat fast garage repair, how long it lasts? It's his T.

A riveted and soldered replacement socket or a better crankcase would be a proper fix.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/36800.html?1191983186


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 09:40 am:

Thanks for posting that link, Dan. It was fun reading that thread from more than 10 years ago. "Uncle Jack" was still with us then.

Sure, there are better ways to do it, but this was done in the car, so that was a plus. As far as lasting, I sold that car a few years ago, so I don't know for sure. But I'd bet it still has that repair. :-)


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