Bad Oil Leak Solved

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Bad Oil Leak Solved
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Saturday, June 30, 2018 - 11:51 pm:

That Vise-Grip has served well for a long time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 08:16 am:

Good job! A bachelor friend of mine used two of the little 4" vise grips as faucet handles on his kitchen sink for years. Then he got married and had to install a new faucet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 09:25 am:

"Then he got married and had to install a new faucet."

'Just like a woman to come along and spoil a good thing, eh? :-)

Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 09:29 am:

Vice grips were still holding the ground wire on the battery on my dodge Dakota when I sold it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 10:02 am:

I'd like to hear about GOOD oil leaks !

You guys must be flush with tools. I only have two pairs of vise grips and I wouldn't be able to function if one pair was "permanently" tied up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 11:04 am:

When I "fix" things in this manner my wife and grown kids look at me like I'm from Mars. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 11:21 am:

Hal, that must be your sedan... I think I see air conditioning parts under the splash apron!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 11:40 am:

I collect Vise Grips!!!! Every swap meet I go to I always look to buy them. Now as you know vise Grip was sold and are now made off shore. The quality has gone down hill.

Now I look for the made in USA pliers and use them in my shop, plus I have them in all my cars tool kits.

I also buy the off shore and lesser quality vise grips and use them when fabricating and welding. I don't care if they get toasted or fried. When they are no longer able to function, out they go.

At swap meets I never pay more than $2.00 for any Vise Grip pliers. These are the best most versatile tool you can own. I think we should start a thread here to find all the creative things guys have discovered with the versatile Vise Grip pliers. Just this week I was working on the aluminum body for my 1928 dirt track car and used 3 pair of Vise Grips to form and hold aluminum panels in place while forming them to fit.

I modify some with a product called Tool Dip. I fill the grip jaws with tool dip to make the jaws less sharp and damaging to aluminum parts while fabricating.

Grip On!!!!

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 12:25 pm:

I found that true. Thought I'd buy another pair, tool rack in the farm store was filled with Chinese junks. Disgusted, I was about to leave when I saw a small display that proudly proclaimed "Irwin - the Original !" I checked out a pair, found they were also fabricated in the Orient - they were marginally better (perhaps even usable) than the other offerings, for half again the price ! I've been tool picking in pawn shops and junk stores for years - "high grading" but it's getting harder to find good stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 04:10 pm:

I realize that this has become a discussion about Vice Grip pliers, and their versatility, which I heartily agree with. I also realize that I'm possibly changing the subject here just a bit, but only "just a bit"......

I suppose this is "old news" to most guys, but as usual, I'm slow to catch on to anything new, but there's a relatively new tool now available, and I think it's really neat!

A LOCKING ADJUSTABLE WRENCH

If I knew how to post a picture, I'd start a new thread on this tool and post a picture, but maybe somebody else will.

My Dad always taught me to only use an adjustable wrench (which he always called a "CRESCENT WRENCH" which many people still do) but only use it as a last resort. His reason for that (which I have always agreed with) is that a Crescent wrench is very hard on hex head fasteners as they are hard to keep a tight grip on the nut or bolt and tend to slip and round off the the hex shape, especially on a worn or rusted nut or bolt. Well, this new locking type adjustable wrench has totally eliminated that problem as the jaws lock very tightly in a very similar manner to Vice Grips, due to a built in mechanism that operates just like vice grips.

There are numerous tool manufacturers that now make these locking adjustable wrenches, in several sizes, and I found that there is a huge range of prices, even tho' the quality of the tool seems pretty good, and about the same no matter which tool company built it. I bought the cheapest one I could find, which was a "Stanley", for $11.99, and it looked to me to be about as good as a couple others I's seen for over $30.00.

Anyway, I think it's a great tool that combines the attributes of a Crescent Wrench and a pair of Vice Grips, and also works very well in certain situations as a very strong clamp. Maybe someone would post a picture one one for me, because if there are still a few out there that are as slow as me to learn of something "new", I think these locking adjustable wrenches are a tool worth knowing about,....FWIW,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 04:22 pm:

BCG, et al,
Some years ago (about 35 years ago), I had a next door neighbor who was in his 80s then. A remarkable man, and his also remarkable wife. In their 80s, he worked part of the year managing a vineyard for for one of the best known wineries in Califunny. In the summer, they traveled up to Canada with their large boat and travel home for salmon fishing (each driving a truck and trailer). They smoked and canned their catch themselves because they didn't trust the canneries that catered to the local fishing trade. And boy, was that stuff good. They always gave me a dozen or so cans every year for watching their house while they were away.

He once told me that back before WWII, he went to work in a shipyard somewhere. The employment "test" was he and everyone else applying for the jobs was given a paper plan, and a bunch of scrap steel, brass, and a screw, along with use of the torch and some tools. They had a limited amount of time to make two pair of "vise grips" which they would need for the welding and fabrication work IF they got the job.
At his age (35 years ago), he was downsizing a lot of the stuff he had accumulated over his lifetime, and having a garage sale. The "vise grips" were there, for sale. I offered to buy them, but he insisted on giving them to me. I still have them. The nicest, toughest, best two pair of "vice grips" I have ever seen or used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 05:41 pm:

Terry, 'tis an oil pump. It gets the pressure up before I start the engine. I have an A crank with inserted mains, drilled for oil psi. The air conditioner compressor and drier are on the other side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim R. Wynn on Sunday, July 01, 2018 - 11:18 pm:

I used vise grips on a hydraulic brake line once long enough to get me home w/o loosing all brake fluid. Also, "Crescent" adjustable wrenches have a proper way to be used so that corners don't round off. The solid jaw (connected to the handle and non-movable) should be used to place the torque on the flats. I know that I may be preaching to the choir, but I carry a limited supply of tools, but three are various sizes of high quality adjustable wrenches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:39 am:

Soon I'm off to the Spokane swap meet and will to add to my collection of "Genuine" USA vise grips. Of course if thee are some off shore ones cheap enough I will add them to my welding shop.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:59 am:

Kim R. Wynn - I'm betting that if you ever tried one of these new lockable adjustable wrenches, you wonder why this tool wasn't invented long ago,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim R. Wynn on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 03:47 am:

I guess that I am "old school". New doesn't necessarily mean better. That's why I have three "T"s to play with. I can't work on these new fangled pieces of stuff other than oil, filters and tires. HA!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 08:24 am:

Harold! I also have one of those locking adjustable wrenches and I think it's fantastic. I had no idea they existed until I got it for Christmas 2-3 years ago and am spoiled with it now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:15 pm:

Yes,....it really is neat tool, and once you use one, you'll wonder why it took a hundred years for somebody to really, REALLY improve on the ol' Crescent Wrench! Thanks for posting the picture Seth, and that's exactly the one I finally bought for $11.99 (Stanley) after looking at several other brands that were much more expensive. Yes, they are just a bit more bulky than the conventional adjustable wrench, but not really that much "bulkier" and Crescent Wrenches really never were noted as being good for getting into tight places,......thanks again Seth,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:20 pm:

Yes,....it really is neat tool, and once you use one, you'll wonder why it took a hundred years for somebody to really, REALLY improve on the ol' Crescent Wrench! Thanks for posting the picture Seth, and that's exactly the one I finally bought for $11.99 (Stanley) after looking at several other brands that were much more expensive. Yes, they are just a bit more bulky than the conventional adjustable wrench, but not really that much "bulkier" and Crescent Wrenches really never were noted as being good for getting into tight places,......thanks again Seth,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:21 pm:

Oops! Did it again! Got distracted and double posted,.......DANG! Sorry,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 12:42 pm:

I often refer to my adjustable wrench as my "American, Metric, British wrench" as it will fit fractional, metric, BSF, BA and other sizes, which also earns it the name, "Italian Fits-All" and also "Rounds-All."
I also have at least a couple of "Improved Adjustable Wrenches of various designs. The one Seth post looks very interesting, I've not seen it before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 01:02 pm:

David - I can "relate" to what you said about some of the past "improved" adjustable wrenches! Years ago, I bought one that had some sort of locking mechanism for the little spiral screw type adjusting "thingie", whatever you call it. The darn thing fell apart, and I lost one little part of that little "mechanism", which of course rendered the wrench completely useless thereafter!

Read my (and Seth's) description of the locking adjustable wrench, and buy one! Trust me,.....you'll love it! And don't look for one at Harbor Freight Tools,.....for some reason, they don't carry them, and I really wonder why,....??? Maybe some type of patent infringement thing or something.

I like your description of the "American, Metric, British wrench" David! My Dad would have agreed with you wholeheartedly! He always warned me to use a Crescent Wrench only as a last resort, especially on old and worn, or rusted nuts and bolts for the reasons you mentioned. Again, these new locking adjustable wrenches like the one Seth and I talked about COMPLETELY eliminates that shortcoming of the ol' Crescent Wrench,.....FWIW,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, July 02, 2018 - 01:13 pm:

In fact (....and this is NOT one of my famous "double posts") I'll add that the new locking type adjustable wrench is a big improvement over ANY standard open end wrench, for the simple reason that ALL open end wrenches must be designed with at least a minimum amount of clearance so as to be sure that a 9/16" open end wrench will easily fit any and all fasteners that are designed for a 9/16" wrench. That bit of "clearance" on even the very best and most expensive wrench will have more and more of a tendency to "SLIP" or at best, round off the corners of a nut or bolt when a lot of force is required to loosen the worn, rusted, or otherwise "stubborn" nut or bolt. Now this is where the new locking type adjustable wrench really, REALLY shines!!! It locks, and tightly grips the nut or bolt as well as the very best pair of vice grips would! And that's something the very best Snap-On end wrench won't do!

Okay,....enough! I sound like a darn tool salesman for cry'n-out- loud, ...... harold


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