Sheetrock and the Model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Sheetrock and the Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 01:48 pm:

This morning my wife and I went and bought a couple of sheets of sheetrock. In my F100 the sheets lay perfectly between the fender humps, almost as if the truck was designed around a 48 inch wide product going there. In the 1990s as a much younger man I used to haul 3 sheets of sheetrock at a time on top of my tiny Honda Civic but I had to buy 2 2x4x 10 footers each time for the sheetrock to lay on, then tieing the whole load to the front and back bumpers.

This got me wondering how would you haul sheetrock with a T. I thought my question might be mute because sheetrock might have been invented after the Ts were made but according to wiki there was a plant making sheetrock in the US in the 1917s. Maybe it was a smaller size then? I donít know, but Iím sure some handy man in the 1920s had to haul a piece at some time. I want to know how he did it.

I can see it being done in the TTs but a regular poor man T how could it be done?

Part of the drive for this question is Iím rebuilding a junk T from the frame up and hoping to turn it into a working manís truck / delivery because my F100 drives to fast.

Has anyone ever tried to haul a piece of 48x96 inch sheetrock in a T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Hansen on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 02:26 pm:

no drywall, but my Dad (in 1947) got a 27 Tudor which had been cutoff behind the doors. Enclosed behind the seats with sheet metal and made a pickup box out of wood, that would hold 1/2 yard of gravel. We used it a lot. And we still have it. Painted with Rustolium, so we all it the Silver Streak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 02:34 pm:

James, I think the flat roof of a tudor or fordor sedan would a decent platform for sheetrock.

Chris....please don't throw out a description of a family heirloom vehicle as epic as what you're describing (and still have) without posting a photo. That's just cruel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 02:44 pm:

Drywall (sheetrock) was first developed in 1916. However , it took the better part of 20 years before it became the standard width (4') widely used today. Also a contributing factor in this discussion is the fact that plywood, developed in 1865, wasn't standardized into 4' X 8' sheets until 1928. Furthermore, with cheap labor in the pre-WW II years builders often stuck to the old lath and plaster they were familiar with in spite of newer products available. After the war when mass production and total cost was a bigger deal, standardized products like sheetrock became more widely used.

Although I can't site specifics, it has always been my belief that standardization of these two products are what led to the just over 4' wide pick-up beds that are in use today. It is also my thinking that these standard 4' wide beds came into vogue in the post WW II years. Standardization of materials and the building boom at that time led naturally standardization of the pick-up bed.

I'm not sure hauling a 4' X 8' sheet of anything on a regular T would work out very well. I suppose you could take the turtle off of a roadster and make a rack, but I doubt you could haul very much at once.

Anyhow, just my $0.02 worth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 02:57 pm:

I have a 24 Coupe that I restored and after adding some new body wood and new top I began to see how 'fragile' T's are. Not that they will break like an egg but realizing it wouldn't take much to damage it. Maybe folks in the T days didn't worry abt it to much since a majority of other drivers drove as slow as they did!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 04:18 pm:

So if they were making plywood since 1865 and it was standardized in 1928 it must have been popular enough in the late twenties so I can use it for a T speedster platform without anybody, like purists, getting too bent out of shape.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 04:20 pm:

James - Not sure what gave me this idea, but if you can visualize how some glass shops haul large windows and such,....they have some sort of "A" shaped framework whereby the large window or whatever stands on edge, but leans in toward the center of the vehicle. Seems to me that a guy could haul 4' x 8' sheets of most anything with a couple hooks of some sort that could protrude out from the Model T running boards so as to allow carrying the sheets on edge, but slanting inward at the top and tied up tightly at the top edge of the sheet of sheetrock. Four feet up from the bottom edge of the sheet would still allow the driver to see out over the opposite or top edge of the sheet, right? Anyway,....just a thought,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 04:35 pm:

First off, reading the forum is a lot more entertaining when you're lysdexic like me . . . I read this topic as "Sherlock and the Model T" expecting an enjoyable meld of Model T lore and Sir Arthur's most famous literary character . . .

No loss. the topic got me mulling terminology in the building trades and "Shmott moichandizin' " . . . "dry wall" used to mean rock walls laid up without mortar. When I was a lad, good home construction still entailed plaster finish on interior walls - what I witnessed circa 1954 was that some efficiency was gained by the use of "rock lath" which was "sheet rock" full of holes to allow the "scratch coat" of a plaster job to "key over" in the holes as it does over wood laths. A "brown coat" of rough plaster mix followed the "scratch coat", which was finished with the application of a coat of white "gauging plaster". At that time, "plaster board" was considered a cheap, shoddy method in new houses unkindly referred to as "lambing sheds".

Of course, the semantic advantage of replacing wood lath with a plasterboard full of holes and calling it "rock" lath was soon extended to the lowly plasterboard, which became "Sheet rock". Hey, do you want the solid permanence of "rock" in your home construction, or that crumby plasterboard ?

(I have to confess this early education has left me forever prejudiced against walls you can put your fist through, and past experiences dealing with "sheet rock" have convinced me I'd as soon take a beating as deal with the stuff !)

To return to the forum theme, I'm convinced you can easily haul enough lath, plaster, lime and sand in a Model T pickup conversion to do a good-sized interior project.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 05:07 pm:

After the war my dad built a house to sell. Then, in the fifties, he remodeled the house we lived in. Both times he used the rock lath Rich described, and there was also metal lath (expanded steel) to use in the corners. But the finish coat wasn't white. He mixed the colors into the plaster.

Somewhat OT is the decline in quality of building materials, specifically wood lath. If wanted to I could reuse some of the lath my grandfather used ninety years ago. In fact, I do occasionally use pieces of it for various projects. The last time I bought any wood lath at the lumber yard it was flimsy trash.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 05:32 pm:

In my 20 years as a remodeling Contractor in New Orleans, I encountered "wood lath" and "metal (wire) lath" plaster walls more times than I care to remember.

Often there was installation of new wiring and/or plumbing involved, as well as installation of insulation in the walls. This meant digging trenches in the plaster and lath, and since real craftsmen in the Plaster trade had mostly died out, we more often than not ended up stripping the walls and ceilings down to the studs and starting over with Drywall.

By the way, "Sheetrock" is a trade name of one manufacturer's product. The generic name is "Drywall."

Back when these houses were built, the studs were rough-cut lumber. They varied quite a bit in dimensions. They were installed with their exterior edges in line, so the weatherboards could be nailed directly to them and produce a smooth exterior wall.

The interior edges of the studs varied as much as 5/8" along a wall. That wasn't a problem in the lath-and-plaster days, since several coats of cementious material (as Rich named above) were to be put over the lath, and their surface could be made straight and smooth by the Plasterer.

If we were to nail Drywall directly over the studs, the finished wall would be a roller coaster. So we'd rip ourselves 1 1/2" wide strips of plywood of various thicknesses from 1/8" to 5/8", and nail them to the studs, working to a string-line. Then nail on the Drywall.


Ah, Nostalgia.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Sunday, July 08, 2018 - 09:12 pm:

In the 60's we used what Dad called rock lathe, it came in a bundle of maybe 6 sheets that were 16" by 48",1/2" thick. At the time we used that under plaster walls, as well as paneling and masonite. I think it depends on what part of the country you're in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 12:42 am:

Peter, it may be drywall in the USA, but her in Australia it's plasterboard. One trade name is Gyprock, that coming from the gypsum used in its manufacture.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 03:02 am:

Going back to the original question. Years ago, a very good friend of mine had a 1915 T touring car. He had other antiques as well, and his daily transportation car was a Ford Mustang. So when he was rebuilding his garage, and needed to go to Home Depot for 4X8 sheets of plywood? The T touring was the transportation of choice. I never saw it, but he said he just put the top down, laid the sheets of plywood onto the rear seat and folded top, tied it down and headed home. He said it always worked just fine. But I also think he only got a few sheets at a time.
Then, some time after he sold the '15 T, he got a '60s pickup.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 07:04 am:

This certainly became educational fast. My wife and I would love to move back to New Orleans area and restore an older home. She knows I only have one more move left in me so she's waiting for right home and time to do it. The terminology is priceless and I thank you all for the education.

My wife has advised me NOT to attempt a sheetrock haul in my Roadster. That just makes me want to do it more. LOL

By the time I get my bitsa turned into a running work vehicle I don't think I'll be able to heft any sheet rock. LOL

Rich as a dyslexia reader I had to reread what I wrote several times because it looked like Sherlock and Ts to me too. Would make a good movie. LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 04:33 pm:

I heard about a dyslexic agnostic that wasnít sure there was a
DOG.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 07:12 am:

LOL


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