WWI Vehicle Identity Sought

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: WWI Vehicle Identity Sought
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 07:23 pm:

Found this on eBay and was wondering if it is a Model T.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith McGowan on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 07:35 pm:

It looks like a Model T ambulance in France.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 10:08 pm:

"Patisserie"= French for a bakery specializing in pastries.
Oh, and yes, a "T" ambulance, probably on a baguette run!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 10:19 pm:

1915 Model T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham, Blackfoot, Idaho on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 10:33 pm:

Yup. A Model T. The letters "patisserie" have been removed from the sign board, flags and an official notice posted above the doorway plus the uniformed official, the nurses and the look of the bundles being loaded into the T would appear the bakery's location was pre-empted as a medical supply depot of some sort ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 10:47 pm:

I was pretty sure it was a Model T. Next question, am I correct that this is not the normal ambulance body shown in most pictures?

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, July 09, 2018 - 10:48 pm:

It has balloon tires mounted on demountable rims that may be a military spec. I can't see any brass on the top of the side light, may be a 16.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 12:25 am:

This is not an ambulance, it is a delivery van. The body is too short to accommodate litters.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 01:12 am:

Maybe not an ambulance but there were some ambulance body designs which were not as long.

Here is one where the litters (stretchers) are alongside the driver, this one is RHD

amb01
amb02
amb03


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 02:35 am:

Looks like a standard British design to me, I have a photo of a whole fleet ready to ship to France in 1915. The demountables are confusing me slightly, when did they first appear? Interesting that it has rear doors rather than a tailboard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 04:21 am:

After-market demountable rim wheels were available from several companies (including Firestone) for the model T by early 1915, and I think a bit before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 05:28 am:

I would say about a year or so younger than this one, a red cross supply car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 04:18 pm:

That is a typical french commercial body, probably locally built. It was probably running suplies for the medical service which would explain the red cross
A similar car (on a TT chassis) was in the recent Den Hertog auction


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 04:21 pm:

Oh and the demountables are Goodyears, they were very popular in WW1 (figures..)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 04:33 pm:

Trying to post a picture, here goes..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 - 05:28 pm:

All respect Leo but the Den Hartogh body is not like that in the photo. That framework side is very French. The period photo is much more like a Manchester ambulance but obviously could be locally built.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 12:09 am:

Hey Peter, the ambulance body you showed is a unique design, I suspect that no examples made it out of Australia as I have not seen any other photos of this design. It is actually a very good design, allowing two litters and two or three ambulatory cases to be carried. The one shown in the original post is a normal covered car body that could have been used to transport ambulatory cases, but I doubt that any were used at the front. Nearly every ambulance company had a few of these, I even have a photo of a depot hack that is numbered to an ambulance company.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 - 12:04 pm:

Jem, i just included the picture to show the typical french way of building commercial body's; i.e. with a wooden construction from the 'waist'down that curves inward going down. I seriously doubt if the TT in the pic really was an ambulance, i saw it in person, it is 20's.
Allmost all commonwealth and US built ambulances were slab sided affairs while most french cars were a little more 'elegant' (Mai naturellemant!)


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