1912 engine work

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: 1912 engine work
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Loftfield on Friday, July 13, 2018 - 11:25 am:

May The Forums Be With You! A couple months ago I sought advice for a 1912 engine that ran rough and had no power. Many thanks to all who responded. It has taken me a bit of time to get to all the suggestions. Because it is helpful to read on the Forum what worked, and what didn't, the following overview is offered. Recap: the car came to me in February from an estate. Since I am not good with the ouija board I couldn't ask the previous owner much. The engine had 50 psi compression at 2200 ft. elevation on all four cylinders, hand cranked cold. The carburetor was filthy, but it got cleaned, ditto the timer. Old gas drained, new gas put in. Nothing whatsoever on the sediment bulb screen, gas flowing nicely at the carb. Many folks thought the timing gears were not meshed correctly, but when examined they were proper. However, the large timing gear retaining nut had been put in backward, yup, nose sticking in through the timing cover. How that worked is beyond me. By getting the retaining nut in properly it was possible to get the new Anderson timer to work. Next it was new coil box and rebuilt coils. Recharge magneto magnets. New Champion two-piece spark plugs, all new wiring. Checked for intake leaks. Still not much joy. Checked valve stem clearances, one was too tight, filed that to 0.30, some improvement. The final piece of the puzzle was putting on an NH carburetor rebuilt by Corey Walker (the correct Holley H-1 is with Stan Howe). Success! I will now add my voice to several recently posted here in support of Mr. Walker's fine work. Two lessons: 1. Despite 56 years of off and on Model T ownership I still learn something new every day on the Forum (plus I really like all the old photos). 2. There was never any one, big, thing wrong with the 1912 engine. Rather it was a host of little things, likely overlooked or done wrong by the previous owner as age got in the way of proper maintenance. Much like the wonderful one-horse shay, it went to pieces all in a day.
Now I can get on with replacing the original 1912 upholstery, nothing but tatters, get into the differential this winter, and find more things on which to spend money.


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