Old Photograph- T takes on small train

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Old Photograph- T takes on small train
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 11:15 am:

From somewhere on the Western Front:

"A Ford car struck by a light rail way train after dark, Feb. 1918"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 - 08:24 pm:

that would make a great diorama.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RalphS in NE Oregon on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 - 12:04 am:

Here's what my friend Bret, who is an expert on old trains has to say about the picture: The locomotive and car look to be US Army equipment. The army bought quite a few gas mechanical engines as well as very small steam locomotives to aid in moving equipment in Europe. I have heard some of the little steam locomotives referred to as trench locomotives. Maybe they did in fact use them in hauling off the spoils from the trenches. Some of the equipment that presumably never left the USA was sold surplus after WW1...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 - 09:28 am:

Even a very small locomotive is heavy. It looks like the T did pretty well, all things considered. I'll bet that that car ran again very soon. It is pretty unusual to have a car vs train collision where the car can be reused.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Thursday, July 19, 2018 - 12:18 pm:

Here's another smallish train from the same theatre- this one belonged to the Kaiser, and unlike the Ford pictured above, it took the brunt of the damage!

Captioned "German engine in a village recently taken by Canadians, July, 1917."


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