You donít find them like this often

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: You donít find them like this often
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 07:25 am:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Barn-Find-1914-Ford-Model-T-Touring-1908-1909-1910-1911 -1912-1913-1915-1916/183336121657?hash=item2aafaf3539:g:eq8AAOSwf0hbUp7j&vxp=mtr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn-Colorado on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 08:25 am:

That would be an interesting one to see up close. Looks like most of the car is in tact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 08:33 am:

Good candidate as is for the museum.
The only problem would be the dust from the vehicle plugging up the building AC


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Emering on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 09:50 am:

I would be very curious what the market is on this vehicle.

Gene


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 10:13 am:

I can see preserving the car but in running condition so it can be driven and enjoyed. That is essentially a dead horse laying on the floor in the middle of the room.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 11:26 am:

Wow! By the look of those tires, this has been driven ALOT!! Probably the only reason it was parked in the 1930ís is because the owner was unable to afford new tires for it during the hard times of the Great Depression.

I have always thought that we Model T owners have always underrated the Model T and thus, are notorious for underpricing our cars, but, I think this T is way overpriced. Others may disagree but, with the amount of work that needs to be done and the amount it will cost for restoration, the most I would consider paying for it would be $15,000.00 and even then, if by some miracle the owner agreed to that, I might change my mind, for at 65 years of age and slowing down, I might not be up to the challenge. It was hard enough at 16 in 1970. Anyway, Anything more than $15,000.00 and it would be very difficult to break even once completed, so from a financial standpoint, at $25,000.00, it would be a terrible investment of your scarce retirement savings. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 12:12 pm:

It's been for sale for years. At that price it will continue to be. He also has the garage it was found in. This guy has some great stuff, all priced this way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 12:16 pm:

Why a museum?. Museums are just dark holes that take cars off the road and never see the light of day again. It's much more interesting to see antique cars out on the road being enjoyed by families that own them and people along the roads watching old cars actually still being driven.

I presently drive a barn fresh 1912 model t in worse condition that this car and you would be amazed at the interest it brings just driving down the road.

Having worked at the largest collection of their time Harrah's, I feel somewhat knowledgeable about the inner workings of "automotive museums" In my 75 years I can not count the number of museums that have gone out of business due to lack of paying customers or interest. Check out the recent fine collection of Hudson's that were placed for auction. Many folks are duped into donating a vehicle with the promise their car will be there forever for all to see. Then the museum falls on hard times or a new board decides to change the focus and in many occasions the cars are sold to friends of board member's or at auction to raise funds for the new direction of the museum. Keep in mind when they sell your donation they will be getting full market value, where you only got a small percentage of the value as a deduction. They got your car for FREE and sell it for a 100% profit at your expense.

You only have to look at the ongoing bru ha ha the Antique Automobile club museum. The board of the museum and the board of the AACA are at odds and will most likely end up in court. The donors all thought they were donating to the AACA and it turns out by slight of hand the AACA has no control or ownership of cars and memorabilia that was donated in the name of the AACA. We are talking of millions of dollars in value here.

No museum is for ever no matter what they tell you to get your donation. If you decide to place your car in their hands, as a 501c you are entitled to a tax deduction. This deduction will be just a fraction of the real value of the donation depending on your tax bracket.

If you still decide to place your car in a museum, forgo the tax deduction it's not likely to keep you from starving and place your car there with stipulations in WRITING that it is still your car and when the museum decides to close or go in a different direction(and they will history will prove this out) Your car is to be returned to you. Most museums want a free and outright donation so they are free to dispose or use your car as collateral to borrow money for operations or expansion. Google museum donations and the problems and you will get an eye full.

This in no way is a reflection of the model t museum affiliated with our club, just in museums in general. I am not trying to offend anyone just open some eyes to the any pitfalls of donating to a museum where you loose all control of your prized possession. I have a collection of antique and classic collector cars and I would rather give them to someone that will use and preserve them rather than the dark hole of a museum.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 01:32 pm:

That T was used after 1933. It would not be so tattered if it have been put away in 1933 and not moved. The tires are rolled flat. I have viewed autos that sat for 50 years and moire and the tires were only flat on the bottom. The tag on the windshield is much later than 1933 and the mark "1911" shows it was showed to others. A $12000 to $14000 T at best.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen, Madera California, USA on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 03:39 pm:

Brass car guy, you are very correct regarding museum donations and reminds me of what happened with the Fresno Metropolitan Museum. The Met was backed by the City of Fresno. With bad management and no City oversight the Met started expanding the museum building but went bankrupt. No cars but much valuable art work and the building that was given to the people of Fresno by the Fresno Bee via the City was lost to the people and sold off, leaving the people of Fresno with nothing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 03:53 pm:

"Askin' ain't gettin' ??? "


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 05:22 pm:

I do not know the fellow offering this car. However, Stan Howe does. What I know, mostly from what Stan Howe has said in past discussions, is that the fellow is a serious collector of unusual antique automobiles in need of preservation or restoration. Apparently, he does have some very interesting things. And he does buy and sell quite a bit. He also has some nice cars.
The fellow gets "bad-mouthed" often enough because he often lists cars or parts of cars on ebay (I am being respectful here) at prices usually twice realistic estimated top dollar values. Stan has said that the fellow does this IN PART to share them with the rest of the world. Stan has said that this fellow will negotiate to a realistic price IF someone shows serious interest and wants to properly restore or preserve a car or rare part. The high prices keep the fellow in control of the situation so that they are not likely to be bought by some fool with more money than brains.
Maybe you wouldn't do things this way? Certainly, I would find other avenues (but then I don't usually refer to that website as "eBad" because I like them). But Stan H says he is a good person and fine fellow. I like and trust Stan H. That is enough for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Sunday, July 22, 2018 - 08:46 am:

Several other items Bob has on Ebay have been discussed here on the forum. His 1918 Coupelet body and a Speedster body have been posted there for several years. I have visited with him at swap meets. He is a very interesting fellow and goes about things his own way. I have greatly enjoyed the photos of his items.
Rich

(Message edited by rich eagle on July 22, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Sunday, July 22, 2018 - 10:11 am:

Brass car guy X2! Unless you are donating to the Smithsonian or the Louvre, sooner or later your car will find a new home and you will have no say about it. Loan to a museum, do not donate unless you are fully aware of your rights (or lack of them).


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