Two steering columns to make one

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Two steering columns to make one
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, August 02, 2018 - 11:37 pm:

An ongoing project is going through my 1970's 1915 runabout and replacing wrong stuff with right stuff. Currently I'm using parts of two steering columns to make one good one.

Getting things apart involves the heat wrench, penetrating oil, motor oil, cutting oil, and lots of hammering, drilling, prying, and pipe wrenching.


One part to retrieve is the #3532 throttle rod guide.


The later version holds both rods, but for 1913-1916 it holds just the throttle rod. Salvaging this one saves me $19 plus shipping.


This column had several good parts, but the main body was ruined. Apparently it collected water which froze and wrecked it.


The "frozen" column had a much better quadrant than the other.


This quadrant has some remains of brass plating. It was held by steel rivets. The other quadrant, which has no trace of brass, was held by brass rivets. None of the rods have any hint of brass. They also have the later "Mickey Mouse ear" handles, so I'm making some rods to look more like 1915.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 09:35 am:

I'm doing pretty much the same thing on my '27 Steve. I'm actually all done except for pinning the throttle and spark levers to their respective roods. I'm waiting for new pins to arrive from Snyder's, then it'll go back in (after paint).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 10:36 am:

I built a steering column out of more parts than just two columns, plus, I installed a NOS quadrant which hadn't been drilled for the two rivets. That is another story. I also used a NOS steering post bracket. Before putting it together, I had all the nickel parts professionally nickel plated. I also had to make two custom rivets to hold the quadrant on. It was worth the effort, but was still a lot of work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 10:54 am:

You'd be done by now if you had used MMO!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 11:01 am:

Steve, your picture reminded me that I need to look at all of my chisels and punches and grind off the mushrooming on the driving ends before they start shedding splinters.

Good luck with the rest of your column rebuild! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 05:58 pm:


In today's thrilling episode I dealt with that cracked brass around the base of the column.


I overdid it a bit, but I'd rather have a little extra than not enough.


It took quite a bit of grinding to remove the excess.


I think primer will fill the scratches and pits. The next question is whether I want to add one of those APCO style braces to prevent any more cracking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, August 03, 2018 - 06:27 pm:

Looks good! I sure hope that the crack was only in the brass. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, August 10, 2018 - 12:47 am:

More steering column work.


I consulted with a plating shop in KCMO today. With shipping, getting the quadrant and levers brass plated will cost almost $300. Ouch! I may wait awhile to talk myself into that.


I found a pretty good dent near the top of the column.


So I piled on the body solder.


Lots of grinding, filing, and sanding got rid of the dent, but I'm not thrilled with the first coat of paint. I hope some fine sanding will make the next one better.


Even after a good wire brushing, the post was too tight to turn in the gear case. So I slathered on some Clover and worked it first with a wrench and then by hand until it would turn freely.


I started cleaning up the case, but the barn where I have the buffing wheel got pretty toasty. I'll finish that job in the cool of the morning.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, August 10, 2018 - 03:45 am:

Looking good Steve J!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 02:52 pm:

Steve, get a Caswell brush plating kit-- I think you'll be out about $60. Then you can plate your rods and the quadrant yourself. Watch the online videos about using it. . Will take time, but much cheaper than $300! AND you can plate a bunch more stuff too. By adding other solutions and wands you can do copper and nickel plating. I redid an oil can with the copper plate and it looks like new now--it will gain patina within a short period of time (copper oxides easily).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 02:55 pm:

I haven't tried their brass kit, but Caswell's nickel plating kit worked well for some small parts I had (windshield pivot thumbnuts and valve stem dust covers). :-)


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