Front Wheel Bearings

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Front Wheel Bearings
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Heiser on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 02:06 pm:

Ready to install the inner/outer bearings on my '25 roadster wheels. How is the inner bearing race installed? Board and mallet or a press?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 02:11 pm:

A press is better if the wheel will fit in it, but I've done it with a hammer too. Grease the surfaces first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 02:26 pm:

I used a threaded rod and one of the bearings to press them in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 02:40 pm:

A brass drift and light hammer blows will work if you spread the blows around the circumfrence to drive the race in evenly without getting it crooked in its bore. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hjortnaes, Men Falls, WI on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 07:52 pm:

If you have the old race, just put it on top of the new race and use a hammer to pound it in, sort of like Mark states above. Goes in nice and straight that way with no harm to the new race.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, August 04, 2018 - 08:07 pm:

I do the same thing as Dave, only I grind some off the outside edge so I dont have to worry about it getting stuck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, August 05, 2018 - 06:55 am:

Mark's brass drift is the intuitive tool to use. Being softer than the race, it is less likely to damage the bearing as it is driven home.
However, in a talk at our local club, a rep from a bearing supplier warned against the practice. He pointed out that brass is much more likely to chip, and if those chips were missed and the bearings assembled as usual, there could be disastrous consequences.
So I changed from a brass drift to a 3/8" steel pin punch. The punch is still softer than the bearing cone. The 3/8" size is wider than the bearing cone and it is easy to keep its edge against the wall of the hub and just use the wall as guide as you move the punch around the cone to drive it home.

It works for me. I can see the ground-undersized-old cone would work too.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, August 05, 2018 - 09:03 am:

Same here, keep in the tool box a set of old races, ground down on the circumference so they can be used as drivers for the front hub races.

Works great each time.





Of course if you have the Ford fancy tool that is good, same principle but uses screw thread for power. With my driver's a flat wood block and mallet sets the race home just as well, 'cept have to do one race at a time :-) Ford's tool is faster...


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