Why Different Tenon Sizes?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Why Different Tenon Sizes?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Babitz on Monday, August 06, 2018 - 07:06 pm:

One of my front wheels has 1/2" tenon wood spokes and the other 5/8". Fortunately I noticed before I ordered new spokes. Anyone have any theory about why they made two different sizes? I'm starting an experiment to see which size lasts longer. Come back in 90 years and I'll report my results.

spokes


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 12:25 am:

Ford wheels used 1/2 tenon (.531 actually) while Hayes used the 5/8 size. So far as I know - Ford never actually sold spokes - just whole wheels which could have been made by Ford or Hayes or Pruddin and perhaps others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 06:58 am:

Wow that press is a work of art itself. Very cool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 07:50 am:

Arthur, where did you get such a coarse threaded rod for your press?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 08:18 am:

https://www.mcmaster.com/#acme-threaded-rods/=1e1v5k5

I'm not Arthur but I know Acme.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks NY on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 08:34 am:

Thanks Tom. That broad threaded rod is the way to go for a wheel press..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Babitz on Tuesday, August 07, 2018 - 11:47 am:

Story about the thread stock-- a local metal supplier ordered it for someone to make cider presses, but they never picked it up. So they gave it to my friend who is a welder. I'll be screwing it together this morning-- all leftover material except for one of the special nuts to mate with that thread.

Happy to hear Tim's comments about the threads. I am a little worried there won't be enough mechanical advantage. The handles can be lengthened with pipe if I need more power. I've never done this so not sure what to expect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By lorenzo leon on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 03:53 pm:

Arthur, are u using one 3/4 plywood on the press? and a bar across , will the presure be only across the center bar and force the sides down?? and cause the fellow to flex when forced ---just asking


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 05:10 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/302832.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Arthur Babitz on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 05:56 pm:

lorenzo, my theory is that the 1/2" steel bar stock bolted to the plywood (dense furniture grade) will be as rigid as 4 sheets of cheap 3/4", but I don't know that for sure. There are now 2 dozen 3 1/2" screws tying it all together. I'll be very surprised if it flexes, but I can clamp it to a welding table if necessary. That will transfer forces to the center of the earth.

After reading all the posts and watching the videos, it sounds like the critical element is stabilizing the hub. Everything else has a bit of float to it so it can center as the hub presses down. I plan to use a "corex" (corrugated plastic election sign) disk to hold up the spokes.

I still have to press in cups and paint the metal parts before we see how this works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Rosenthal in Cincinnati Oh on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 08:58 am:

Interesting spoke data...thanks John. When researching my 12 Town Car project, I inspected 2 very complete T/C survivors....one was the 1912 in Oblong Illinois, the other was a 1911 in France. Both cars have what are believed by their owners to be their original wood wheels, where both display "H" fellow plates. These spokes have greater mid spoke section area and are oval in shape, versus the tear-drop shape typical of the Prudden wheel. Does it seem plausible that these beefier series wheels were designated for the heavier Town Car and Delivery Car service bodies?

Regards,
Scott


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