Engine shop recommendation near Nashville please

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Engine shop recommendation near Nashville please
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Ryan Snellen on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 11:22 am:

Hi MTFCA.

I'm looking for recommendations for an engine shop who can harden my valve seats in the general Nashville TN area. I'm also in central KY often near Lexington & Louisville if that helps open up options.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 01:15 pm:

Millers in Shannon, OH or Joe Bell would be excellent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 02:22 pm:

Brent Terry on Elizabeth, TN would be another great choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Ryan Snellen on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 03:52 pm:

Thank you David. I drove up and visited with Joe while he poured my new babbitt. We didn't address having the seats done while I was there but also didn't realize the specialty of this type of work on the ole blocks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 04:41 pm:

Any good auto machine shop can install hard seats.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Ryan Snellen on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 05:29 pm:

I thought so too Dan but two performance machine shops and one inquiry have not turned fruitful yet :/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 06:26 pm:

I've had R&R Machine shop in Huntsville AL install seats in motorcycle heads. They may be able to do your block. Call them at (256) 539-0824


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 07:24 pm:

Why do you want hard valve seats? Are the valve heads recessed in the block? Otherwise, it is money wasted and a chance to have a seat come out (trust me, they sometimes do, though any shop will state that THEIRS will not).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By J. Ryan Snellen on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 10:04 pm:

Scott, the hard seats were recommended by Joe Bell after I left his place when he re-poured and bored my rods and journals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Wednesday, August 08, 2018 - 10:18 pm:

Ask him "why" so that you know exactly why you're looking to have the work done. There are benefits and there are risks associated with doing this work. The risks rise with a shop that is only marginally engaged with you on the work. If it was a shop that specialized in "T" work and were enthusiastic and engaged, then the risk is much much lower.

My point is: be very careful who does this work and be sure it will be to your benefit.

And for you and everyone else, please, this is not a reflection on Joe...you simply need to be a fully informed consumer of this service.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 01:14 am:

Others may disagree, but the only reason to install seats is if there is crack repair near the seat or some previous animal trashed the seat by cutting it too big or deep or an exhaust valve burned and trashed the seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 02:36 am:

If the block required seats, this job should have been done before any cylinder re-bore work, more often than not fitting seats disforms the top lip of the bore.
My first preference is to fit over size valves to the original block because, as seen in this photo, if running a little lean or hot, the bore wall can pull away from the fitted seat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 06:14 am:

Had Ron's Machine Shop up by Cincinnati do mine a while back. Work turned out fine and I like the results. Just give them a long lead time to get it done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 07:03 am:

I use Kellyís engine shop in union city Tn. Heís really good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 08:34 am:

I had an older fellow that told me back in the day you had cast valves and a cast block, now a days we have Stainless steel valves that are hard and pound down into the soft cast block, so you want to hard surfaces meeting each other. Made sense to me. Just my thoughts, Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry K. Lee on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 02:00 pm:

Modern stainless steel with cast iron really does not over slap the seats unless you are building a high RPM engine, i.e. lighten flywheel, counter balanced crankshaft, oil pressured mains, etc. The RPM's up to 2400 are only turning the valve train at 1200. Keep the valves adjusted at .012" and they will do fine. Just my $.02 with results in the past.

Hank in Tin-A-See


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lyndon Moore on Thursday, August 09, 2018 - 02:35 pm:

Guys, this is a battle that there will never be a winner. Itís about like Marvel Mystery Oil. I have been in business for 43 years owning a complete automotive machine shop. I have just learned to do what the customer wants. After all these years, I have had just about every kind of engine and heads in my shop from Model Tís to the modern vehicles today. From single cylinder hit and miss engines to large industrial engines. Gas and diesel. And there are so many types of seats. They are not all made of the same material. But I will add. If you decide to burn propane in your T, you will definitely need to put hard seats in.


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