How to sell a fully restored 1927 model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: How to sell a fully restored 1927 model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brent Smith on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 11:08 am:

Thank you for allowing me to register. My grandfather who passed away in 97 had completed his life project of a fully restored 27 T and I have to admit it was one of the more amazing vehicles I've had the chance to drive. Since then he's passed away and his son recently passed away. The rest of the family not only doesn't have the skills to keep up this vehicle but we don't have the space. We'd like for someone to have this wonderful time piece to continue with having them on the road or in car shows or in a museum but we don't know where to start. Any help would be appreciated. My grandfather and his son lived in Plevna KS which is why I got onto this group due to closeness. Their names were John and Larry Gardner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 11:20 am:

I suggest you post a few photos of the car here and ask for opinions of value. Once you've decided on a price, you can offer it for sale in the classifieds on this website and/or post it with Hemmings and/or any one of a number of other places cars are offered for sale.

IMHO T guys are pretty visual. The more pictures the better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 11:36 am:

Henry is right. Lots of pictures. Here's a page about selling a T:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG100.html

And here's one about prices:

http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG99.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 11:41 am:

Welcome to the forum and sorry about the passing of your Grand Father and Uncle.
First step is pictures, good clear ones. This site only allows 250KB and under so they need to be resized. Next; What ever information you can remember or have paperwork of work done should be talked about in the ad about the condition of the car. Was the running gear rebuilt or overhauled?
Does it have paper work like title or ownership proof? Do you have the power to sell? If not, you should get it in your name before selling. The demand of Model T's in the market place is not high so price should reflect that. You can start high but if it's too high for the market, people will be turned off. Do some research on what cars have sold for, not what people are asking. Ebay is a good source. Prices from the big car auctions does not reflect true current market. If and when you post your ad here expect you might get some critique, take it in stride, most is well meaning and trying to help. You might start by posting some photos here, don't start a new string, and what you know about the car. The members should be able to help with real market price or suggest finding a way to keep it as a link to your Grandfather.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 12:17 pm:

Yes. Please post pictures here so we can see it. If it is painted outlandish colors like pink or lime green, because that was his granddaughterís favorite colors, then it will sell for much less (maybe $10,000.00), however, if it was painted the original color of Maroon, with red striped upholstery or the less original, but acceptable black, then it will bring more (maybe $15,000.00) from the knowledgeable members on this site, who tend to shun Model Tís that stray too far from what Henry Ford did back in the Day and have a tendency to undervalue the Model T. Of course my prices are only a starting point. The more you can start with, the better (for once the price has been posted, you can go down, but can never go up) and you might be surprised. Start high and adjust the price with each auction if it does not sell during the cycle of the prior auction.

When I say auction, of course I am referring to eBay. EBay reaches more people, world wide and the potential buyers are less discerning and more accepting of Model Tís that are not perfectly original. When you post the auction, put your best foot forward. Wash and wax your car. Just as you never drive a T in the rain, do not use a garden hose as your T is not waterproof. Use a clean cotton cloth and give it a sponge bath with soap and water. Keep the water away from the windows and door cracks. You can rinse it with a hose, just be careful to keep the water away from the afforementioned area. Clean the windows with Windex, as water can flow down the windows into the doors and will puddle in the bottom of the door and pose a rusting hazard. It can also flow down the inside of the windows and leave water stains on the upholstery. Under the hood, use spray on engine cleaner/ degreaser and get it as clean as possible. Then take plenty of pictures, inside and outside, and under the hood, from all sides. Then compose a good description of all aspects of the car as well as including your *Grandfatherís story and how well he cared for it and how much it meant to him. If this post gets a lot of attention, perhaps the members here will be able to contribute to your description by letting you know what you have based on the pictures you post here. *Potential buyers want to know that what they are intending to buy was loved and well cared for. Good luck. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 12:24 pm:

Mark is right. If you want to comment, or offer more information or pictures come back to this thread and post it to this thread. Many, unfamiliar with the forum think they have to start a new thread for each response. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 12:27 pm:

Brent. Was you Grandfather a member of mtfca? Did he ever post on the forum? Would we know him? Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brent Smith on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 01:05 pm:

Thanks for all your wonderful and quick responses. He didn't know anything about internet so my guess is he doesn't know a group existed, unless he spoke to someone individually. He had his own garage in Plevna. Gardner's Garage. I'll be sure to do all I can that you listed with care of the T and photos. I'll try to get as much information as I can. I know he traveled all over the USA to get his parts for the T. I'll let my parent's know what you wrote as they didn't know where to look. Most of this knowledge left with my uncle lastweek.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 01:51 pm:

One thing you can do that would potentially increase value somewhat is get the engine number located on the left (drivers) side of the engine just above where the water inlet is bolted to the side of the engine. Then see if you can get the number probably stamped on the upper part of the frame rail somewhere on the right (passengers) side under the edge of the hood. If these two numbers match you can be pretty sure it's the original engine. If not, you'll know it's a replacement engine.

In any event, serious T buyers will want to know the engine number.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 02:32 pm:

I have two 1926 Model Tís. A coupe and a Fordor (Fordís cleaver name for the Four door sedan). The 1926 models are virtually identical to the 1927 models. Both were advertised as Improved Model Tís, in response to waning sales as competing car manufacturers began to introduce features that far exceeded the features on the Model T, which had changed little since 1909. The VIN numbers, on the chassis of both of my Tís matches the engine number, which is stamped into a smooth area of the block on the left side, above the water inlet. Having matching numbers, is a very desirable selling point, as it means that the engine has never been changed and indicates the date the car was manufactured. Non-matching numbers means that the engine and chassis did not leave the factory together, but, could be years apart. Some Model T owners couldnít care less about matching numbers, but for others, like me, it means a lot and was one of many determining factors in the purchase of both of my Tís and if yours has matching numbers it should be mentioned in your description.

On my coupe,the VIN number Is on top of the chassis on the left side under the floorboard. On my Fordor, the VIN number is on the top of the chassis, on the right side, under the floorboard. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 09:11 pm:

Brent, if you click on the classifieds and go to a post entitled "FS 1914 roadster ...." posted on Aug 12 at 12.02am, you will fond an excellent template for you to follow. The same shots of your car would help possible buyers .

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brent Smith on Saturday, August 18, 2018 - 09:54 pm:

Thank you Allan!


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