New shop, Iíve 2k, how to spend.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: New shop, Iíve 2k, how to spend.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Monday, September 17, 2018 - 11:12 pm:

What do I need for a new shop. Iíve some tools from my grandfather. What do I need for a shop?
Lathe
Press
Belt saw
Grinders


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 12:19 am:

2 Bench grinders. One with grinding wheels and one with wire wheel and buffing wheel, drill press, hydraulic press, big tool box for organizing hand tools, floor jack, engine stand, air compressor, overhead engine hoist on rails, if possible or floor type hydraulic hoist. Welder. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 01:10 am:

Jim I get it, in regards to the grinders. Iíve the floor jack, and the tool boxes,. Iíve one engine stand, occupied by a 27.
My mentor lost his shop, tools and all, 50 years of tooling and machines. Iím a new generation, Iíve seen Harrahs collection. I was 10, and itís had a lasting effect.
Jim, thank you sir, my house is open to you if you venture west.
My word is my bond,
r/s @Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 02:28 am:

It is amazing the things you can do with a drill press. I wouldn't have thought it twenty years ago. But I have TWO drill presses in my shop today. I grew up with a pretty good circa 1960 big floor model Craftsman drill press in our garage. It actually belonged to an uncle, but stayed in our garage for decades because he and my dad were long-time buddies, and we had a better workplace to use it. Eventually, years later, I got a small table-top drill press from one of the well known cheap too places for my own garage. It turned out to be a pretty good cheap drill press. There are a lot of things I can do on the big drill press that cannot be done on the little one. I stand wheel rims in it and drill for rivets. Sometimes I run the hone in engine cylinders. I have had to drill the end of axles, furniture, a dozen other large items. But the big motor and pulleys use more power, just one consideration. And the small drill press is handier and quicker for so many small jobs.
After my dad passed about fifteen years ago, I found I really like having both of them in the shop. Besides. Sometimes I set up the big one for rebuilding a set of wheels. And then I need to do a couple small jobs. Small one to the rescue.

Hand held disc grinders are great for a lot of fabrication work, smoothing welds and so forth. But a nice bench grinder can do so many things. I have been fortunate to have had many of these tools my whole life. They were my dad's, now they are mine. I grew up with them, learned how to use them when I was very young. My acetylene torch is older than I am, and many other tools nearly as old as I am. Old good quality tools are best. Some cheap tools can be good. High quality or cheap, take good care of your shop tools and they will take care of you for a long time.

Another thing that is very helpful, is a metal band saw. My dad bought a cheap one for a job about forty years ago. Brand new it was about $200 then (pre-Chinese, I think they are still that cheap today). It has been used hard and a lot. Won't cut straight, but I can almost always work around that (clamp the work in crooked to compensate!). A casting broke, and I bolted a patch onto it. The guide wheels have worn out and fallen apart several times, but I keep shimming them and patching them back together.
With a torch, drill press, band saw (even a cheap one), and grinders. It is amazing the things one can make.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan Pfau on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:12 am:

When I look at what I really use the most in my shop, it seems like it is always about cleaning something...rust, paint etc.
My angle grinder and wire wheel grinder on stand are used a lot. I also use my sandblast cabinet quite often.
I picked up a portable band saw a few years ago and use that instead of prolonged hack sawing, My air compressor powers a lot of hand tools and my rolling craftsman tool cabinet keeps tools organized and most importantly easy to put away when done.
Of course for the T a decent jack and safe jack stands are a must. Maybe some cheaper car rollers if you need to move the chassis around for room. I got a cheap set of furniture moving dollies I "beefed" up a little with some scrap wood that holds my touring just fine as long as you have a smooth floor to move to move it on.
I agree with Wayne. You can do a lot more than you might think with a drill press, but I will also throw in you can do a lot with a disc/belt sander too.
I like to shop garage and estate sales more than HF to save some dollars. Just be selective and look things over thoroughly before buying.
Just my 2 cents


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:20 am:

Wow, what a question to get an avalanche of great advice. This will be some thread!

Jim nailed a bunch of fundamentals. I would add bead blast cabinet, with good cooling/water separating piping if you do not live in an arid climate. Maybe I will post what I came up with in another thread.

Get a torch per Wayne, you will need it. A shop crane, at least 2 tons and the kind that breaks down for storage works well for my limited space. Believe it or not, an anvil is fundamental. Get a forged one, not a cast one. A surface plate is good to have, used from Craigslist works. Precision measuring tools are fundamental. Heavy duty workbenches with good lighting. Heavy duty adjustable shelving. A BIG vice, solidly mounted. A big power panel and lots of outlets at bench top height. For the wall, a decimal equivalent chart and a calendar with old car pictures. Forget the clock, most of my repairs are measured in days!

I envy you your project. I would love to build my dream shop!

Cheers, Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:37 am:

torches, parts washer, sandblasting cabinet, fire extinguishers (A,B, and C) ventilation and alarm systems
A nice stereo system with satellite radio capability and a comfy chair!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:46 am:

A wire wheel is the very best tool for taking parts from your hand and throwing them beyond further use! Before we fill your shop how big and tall will it be? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Kuhnash Southeastern Ohio on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:50 am:

Buy tools youíll use on your modern stuff also.
Good jack, jack stand, good air or electric impact gun, air compressor. Good set of basic hand tools.
You will be surprised with how much time and money you can save by changing your own, shocks, brakes, oil, basic stuff.
Plus you will learn a bunch about your own vehicle.
Bigger tools I buy when I find them at a good price, like lathe, press, welders. Sometimes I buy a new tool to do a job, I figure Iíll do it myself and still have the tool left often cheaper than paying someone.
You mention 4 tools in your message, lathe, press, band saw, grinder. I have all of those like many here, but 90% of the work you do in your garage, on modern cars or model T will be done using good old hand tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ralph Sullender on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 09:07 am:

Add more lighting and electrical outlets than you think you will ever need caus you will!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 09:48 am:

You definitely need an air compressor. You can do a lot with an air compressor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 10:13 am:

I agree with allot of the above but research and buy as needed.

The most used items I'm my shop is 2 sets of wooden saw horses. Both no higher than 28 inches and some plywood. I use a 2 foot by 4 foot plywood and saw horses to be outside cleaning parts or work table near the project. The other set has a 8 foot x 3 foot plywood to set up work bench in the shop that I can move around.

Shops evolve as needs and interests change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 10:36 am:

Thank you Robert. One thing I forgot to mention in my list is a Delta bench belt sander. Although it is a woodworking tool, it has a very flat hard bed for flat sanding as well as a curved surface at each end. I use it a lot to sharpen tools and shape bolt heads and parts to size. You can get a variety of belts with different grits and the quick change feature of the Delta makes going from medium grit to fine very quick and easy. Also a couple of good telescoping, fully adjustable halogen shop lights to provide your work area with plenty of bright light to see what you are doing. A recirculating solvent parts cleaner might help as well. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 10:44 am:

A good vise and an Hydrolic press are very handy tools to have.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 10:52 am:

For years I kept the TT in my garage/shop. The bed of the truck is 39" high. I found this height perfect for working on stuff and pretty much always used it instead of the workbench. "Standard" counter/work bench height is 36". The extra 3" avoided back strain that always occurred with the 36" work height.

I'm 5'-8" tall. I suppose the ideal work height varies with the size of the person. Anyhow, it's something to consider.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:08 am:

220 volt power and a Lincoln buzz box stick welder.I had to have mine worked on once after 40 years.With good heavy 220 power you can also make a adapter to drop a leg and have strong 110 volt for heavy jobs.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:18 am:

I have all or most all the above mentioned tools, but use my lathe and cabinet blaster the most.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:19 am:

Robert, you need more money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:23 am:

Alan reminded that bench grinders are much more versatile mounted on heavy floor stands as it allows you to use your wheels from angles that having it on a bench would prohibit. This is especially useful when using the wire wheel in removing rust or the buffing wheel in getting into hard to reach spaces. Sometimes you have to use the back of the wheel or the side, to redirect the sparks or cast-off away from you. Of course this entails removing the guards to expose and allow you to use all sides of the wheels. Both of my grinders are on heavy stands and all have had the guards removed. Just be careful not to allow your shirt tail to get caught in it and pull you in. A small sandblasting cabinet would be handy as well. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:24 am:

$2000 to spend? Well, let's see here.......

Lathe: 2 grand won't cover everything when you include needed accessories, and you will spend time learning to use it. Wait on that one.

Drill press: Most definitely, much better than a hand held "hole shooter". Try to find a good, used American made floor press if possible. Used, $150-$200.

Air compressor: Look for an upright, at least 5 hp, cast iron pump unit. So many uses in a shop I can't name them all. A good used one will be around $300.

Electric welder: Very nice to have (especially the wire feeds), but you can also farm out the welding and use the money for other things for now. $400-500

Oxy-acytelene torch: A good idea. You will pay for the regulators and torch, rent the tanks. Great for precision welding on small stuff and wonderful for making steel bend to your will by heating. About $200 plus tank rental. Note: You can also buy the medium size tanks and save the rental fee. Just swap them out when empty.

Metal cut off saw: Very useful and a heck of a lot easier than using that hacksaw on the wall. Look for a Taiwanese made saw, not Chinese. About $300.

Those are the basic tools for cutting, shaping, drilling and you can spend the change on needed hand tools (combination wrenches, socket sets, pliers, etc.)until you determine what more you need.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 12:17 pm:

2K is not that much in today's world...
Not sure of your ceiling height, but a lift was the best tool I ever bought. I found a 9K lb 2 post BendPac for 1K on the local Auto Trader about an hour away !
A MIG welder, torches and air compressor and some air tools first, IMHO.
Sand blasting cabinet, grinder, all important also, a small fridge is very helpful !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 04:06 pm:

Its all listed above. I saw things indolent have after working on cars for 40 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Carrico on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 08:45 pm:

As noted above 2k is not a lot of money these days. Many good heavy tools can be found cheap and used if you search around, I have not had much luck with craigslist. Networking/talking to people or auctions have been better.
Tools that I use on nearly every project are my air compressor, drill press, 4-1/2" grinder and vice.
Air compressor: there is no replacement for quality here CFM is king. I have a BelAire 5hp that can run laps around cheaper units, Quincy would be another good bet. My father got it for me when I was 15 years old and it was well above $1000 then but the price is pretty much forgotten now and I am certain it will outlive me. I ran cheap air tools with in the beginning it since it has plenty of CFM, then bought better tools as needed later.
Drill: Had a floor model craftsman from 70's it was way too light. Bought a Jet floor model in the 90's still too light, bought a camel back style from 1910's for 10$ it is roughly ~1500lbs and love it no vibration at all -but for the space conscious look into something like a Grizzley 20"
Angle Grinder- I thought one would be useful and by chance bought a Metabo on sale. I cannot imagine working without it now. Metabo has great torque and took a lot of abuse cutting steel and even concrete on home improvements -after beating it up for maybe 15 years or so a fan impeller inside cracked and let loose a month ago but parts were easy to find the unit got new brushes and bearings while it was apart we'll see how the next 15 years go. Cutting/grinding wheels, wire wheels and sanding disks get expensive the grinder is the cheap part but they are in use constantly on old rusty stuff.
Big vice 6-8" jaw, small too if you can afford. Watch the quality of steel if buying new some are under 30k psi some are over 70k psi. Mine are all old and close to free but have served well.

There are lots of other things of course but I can hardly do a project without calling on these 4 items.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 09:16 pm:

'Rome was not built in a day" and throwing $2,000 on equipment will not do you much good. Purchase equipment as you need it and the useful tools will build your talents. Your inventory will let you learn and maybe earn extra $$$ but to just buy a bunch of stuff is a bad plan. Each thing you buy is what you need right now and that is how you learn the priority.

Start out by working on something and buy what you need to do it then you own the equipment. Take the next step and purchase the next tool needed, not the 10th thing you might need. In this order you might be surprised how far $2,000 will go as it compounds and builds on itself.

Just a big pile of "stuff" will not work well together as there will be missing parts in the equation. A good shop has to evolve to be successful.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 09:28 pm:

Thanks all for the input. I have a lot of,the,basic stuff already. I think a bench grinder, metal band saw, and a welder/gas, will be it for now.
Iíll continue shopping for a used lathe.
r/s Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garland E Pobletts; Naples Fl on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 10:58 pm:

A basic item but often overlooked for starting a new shop; some heavy duty steel shelving units for cans, parts,tools, "stuff" are a must. Check Costco if you have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:15 pm:

Bob, check out a hand held portable band saw like a Portaband. Craigslist is a good source down here in OC. I have a big upright air compressor and sure wish it was a smaller one. It takes a lot of running to fill that tank every time I want a little air, and a lot of floor space.

No one has recommended but I must have a Sink with running water. You can wash parts, cool metal besides washing your hands and getting a drink.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 11:23 pm:

My air compressor is in the barn attached to the back of my garage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 07:27 am:

Gene, put a shut off valve at the air compressor and open it every time you need to use it. Then close it when done, that way the air won't leak out thru the fittings in all the lines. I would never go back to a smaller compressor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 11:42 am:

Tim Moore is right on!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 11:45 am:

One TOOL that no one has mentioned; HEAT or AC! :-) As far as drill presses go, get one with as many speeds as you can if yours does not. I had an old Craftsman but without the idler pulley setup, it was only 4 speeds and found none were slow enough for some jobs. Craigs list and Ebay can be a great places to shop for used tools. I bought my lathe off Craigs list, Atlas 9" (go for 10-12" if you buy one of any brand, there is more tooling available used on Ebay) long bed for $200. While it has some issues that I have learned to work around, it's the tooling that starts to add up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 02:23 pm:

My current house came with a commercial-style air compressor. When I saw the compressor, we made the offer for the house contingent on it being left for us. It's wonderful to have. I also agree on a decent drill press. If you can find a half where near decent hydraulic press I would grab it, once you have one, you will be amazed at the number of uses you will find for it. As has been mentioned previously, great LED lighting, many electrical outlets, at least one 220V outlet, and decent heating/cooling are great. A smooth concrete floor is a godsend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 03:46 pm:

Even if you buy used,buy quality which will be with you the rest of your life and then passed along again!!! Bud in Central,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rogers on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 06:13 pm:

Small refrigerator and a urinal! Lol!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 07:16 pm:

Bud is spot on with the ďqualityĒ statement. Quality doesnít cost, it pays!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Brown on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 09:33 pm:

Costco has a nice 6 foot workbench for $300. has 3 drawers a heavy wire shelf at the bottom and large lockable casters and it rolls like a dream. Heavy wood top that looks too nice to damage from use. you can move it to your work or out of the road.
Another handy thing that is inexpensive is to take 1/2 inch heavy wall plastic pipe and plumb to your compressor andrun it around your shop wall and put air chucks in a tee about every 10 feet or closer if you want. At the end put a short downpipe and a valve at the end to blow out moisture. Put a shutoff valve at the beginning in case you want to shut it off or have a leak. you can plumb in a flexible hose to the compressor to reduce vibration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 10:47 pm:

Along the lines of the saw horses mentioed above, my backsaving, height adjustable, folding work table is just so handy. It began life as a drafting table. With a new timber top, it gets used for all sorts of stuff. The top can even be locked at an angle, handy when setting up stuff for welding.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 11:02 pm:

Update on my perfect shop. Tomorrow Iím going to look at the perfect lathe, 12Ē x 54Ē. I understand Tim M,s statement about a pile.
Iím only 60 years old, I plan to be here awhile. Iím tired of making due with stuff that can, maybe work. Iím tired of asking favors, and help, as I stand helpless watching. Iíve acquired a lot of the necessities over the last 3 years.
My Best purchase to date is a quality floor jack.
If there is further interest. I will update my quest for a good shop, along with other purchases and pictures.
Once again, thank you all for your input, I believe some of you are also thinking, what if?
r/s Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jerry knouse on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 08:20 am:

Lights, lights, and more lights both fixed and portable on stands. Also a good fan for both venting and refreshing. Good luck and have fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 08:49 am:

I bet we are ALL thinking "What if..." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 08:54 am:

Think twice about using plastic piping for high pressure air. I have seen a couple of videos where piping and tanks have exploded, and it scares the beejeezuz out of me. This is one place it makes sense to overbuild. IMHO Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 09:22 am:

My shop is 28'X 48' X 14' high.I doubt any need that but my grandson installed a very large air hose reel and i can even air up tires in about 150' distance.At the start i thought about using the 6" pipe that are the leg's for my overhead hoist as air tanks but i do not need that much storage or that many more places to leak! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 09:35 am:

Does your shop have good rat proof garage doors? They are a must to keep rats, mice, spraying cats and nosy neighbors and thieves out of your shop and Model T and will also allow for an air conditioner/ heating system, but just one garage door will eat up a good portion of your budget. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 10:24 pm:

I've spent 900. I answered an add on craigslist the day after I posted the original wish, help me advice post.
900 bought a 12" lathe with a 36" deck, 1940s craftsman, plus additional chucks, calipers, and a lot of stuff that ill have to figure out. Also a 6' stand drill press, a metal cutoff saw, and a gas torch with gauges. ill have the gauges rebuilt.
I told the man that sold this to me that the parts and pieces were worth as much as the rest of stuff. it was his dads, and he needed it to go to a good home. the best part about this is that it came from my home town, Grass Valley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 10:26 pm:

so I have 1100 left.
were to put that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 10:40 pm:

I think you did very well if those Starrett boxes are full.Over 30 years ago when i bought my Starrett dial caliper 12" the change from 200. would not have bought a lite lunch!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 11:32 pm:

Copy Bud, Iím trying to copy my mentors shop. I will never get there. I passed on the 36Ē vintage brake, and the 36Ē roller.
They are very nice vintage pieces.
Also a shop smith, very large, that will do key ways.
r/s Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, September 21, 2018 - 05:45 pm:

If you don't have a good air compressor,stop and get 1.Then work from there. A good shop grows around a air compressor.It will allow you to media blast,spray paint,work die grinders and so forth.But I must admit,i prefer to use my electric die grinders. I can buy a harbor freight electric die grinder cheaper than a air compressor.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, September 21, 2018 - 07:06 pm:

Have you looked on Craigslist (www.craigslist.com) for used tools? Sometimes you can get some fantastic deals, especially when a fellowís ex-wife wants to get even by selling her exís tools and turning his shop into a sewing room with the proceeds. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, September 21, 2018 - 08:33 pm:

Yes, you did very well. Keep looking, you may have a knack for finding a good deal!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, September 21, 2018 - 09:26 pm:

I did it again. Offered a suggestion that was already followed. I just saw where you went on Craigslist to find that great deal. Great job! Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Bente on Saturday, September 22, 2018 - 09:58 pm:

I've set the lathe up, and machined my first part. I really like this tool. I have 1100 bucks left, I've a compressor etc., etc.
I bought a gas torch with tanks, nozzles, gauges, etc. ill be cautious with the gauges.
Still think I need a bench sander, 2 double bench grinders, a press and a wire feed welder/gas.
Input from you all is invaluable. A hoist is later on my bucket list.
r/s Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Davis. Tomball Texas on Saturday, September 22, 2018 - 11:03 pm:

One item I didn't see mentioned which I May have overlooked. Hydraulic Table / cart.
I bought the Heavy Duty one. with 1000 lb lift ? from HF and find it very handy for getting heavy items in and out of the truck and on and off the work bench. Much cheaper than a double Hernia operation. plus the table is a handy small work space by itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Saturday, September 22, 2018 - 11:30 pm:

Give us a panoramic shot of your shop when it is done.
Looks pretty nice from what I have seen in the posted pictures. Jim Patrick


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