Tudor Door Off

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Tudor Door Off
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Saturday, September 29, 2018 - 11:16 pm:

Last year about this time, I noticed a gap at the base of the driver side door. There have been one there before I restored the car but now it seems to greater and I could feel air rushing in. life got busy and I never got around to analyzing what the problem was. I finally did today and it appears that the whole door is angled downward towards the rear about half an inch lower that should be causing a gap got the bottom. The hinges are tight on both the door post and the door. When I took out the hinge pins and realigned the door to where it should be the bottom two hinges did not line up at all. Can shims be put in to fix this or is there a better solution to fix this problem?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 01:17 am:

I'll bet Dan Trease can answer this one, as he has a 1926 Tudor. By the way, Jim. Very nice Tudor on your profile picture. Is that the one you are talking about?

The top of the doors on my 1926 Coupe have a big gap that I have never been able to adjust, so I would also be interested in hearing suggestions on how to adjust the doors on 1926-'27 improved, all-steel bodied T's.

Good luck. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 01:19 am:

More than likely you both have a sagging frame. Good news it is and easy fix, bad news you may have to take the body off to do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 06:59 am:

I agree. With a big piece of sheet metal spanning the entire outer surface, it is not likely the door is skewed out of square. More likely, the door opening in the body is skewed out of square making it LOOK like the door is skewed.

It may be possibly to shim the body to compensate. Say the door is dragging at the bottom on the latch side, opposite the hinge. A shim under the body at the door post where the hinge is located would tend to lift the entire door. The fit at the hinge line won't change but it will lift the door on the latch side so it doesn't drag anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 01:24 pm:

How does one fix a sagging frame? BTW, thanks, Jim, for the nice words and yes, that is a car I am talking about.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 06:35 pm:

It sounds like you are saying that the best way to ensure a proper fit of the doors is to make sure the body is adjusted and the doors fit during the restoration process, while the body is off the chassis prior to assembly, painting and upholstery. That makes sense, but it is a little late for me.

As I understand it, about the only way to close the gaps at the top of my doors would be to install the doors onto the stripped down body, and somehow, jack the roof frame outward until the gaps at the top of each door is closed.

Is there a way to do this after the car has been completed?

Jim Patrick

PS. Jim, I will be painting my 1926 Fordor a nice gloss Maroon color, similar to the color on yours. What is your Tudor painted with?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 06:52 pm:

Jim,

No, i was talking about adding shims between the body and frame. I can't say for T's, but I'm pretty sure it was a norm at the factory on A's just to compensate for manufacturing variations. Of course, it would be best practice to start with a straight frame, but in the absence of that, it is conceivable that shims could compensate for the sagging frame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Sunday, September 30, 2018 - 06:55 pm:

Thank you, Hal. Jim Patrick


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration