What was the kind of tar to use for the coil?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: What was the kind of tar to use for the coil?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 01:58 pm:

What is use to replace the tar in a coil?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 02:22 pm:

Type III steep slope roofing asphalt. Add low odor to that spec if you like.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 02:27 pm:

Type 3 Steep Roof Asphalt. TRU-LO stuff stinks the least and is made by Dow Chemical I think.

Purchase at roofing supply place but it is sold in 100 lbs "kegs" although the keg is really a metal disc about 12" in diameter with a cardboard or heavy paper roll above it filled with tar and NO LID. It is cheap at around $50 a keg or less. My advice would be to find a commercial roofer in the area who tars flat roof commercial buildings. Then drive your T to his house and ask him if he might spot you a coffee can full of tar. The most common Tar you can buy is the type 3 I mentioned above so that is what he is going to have laying around. A chunk of it is all you need to do 4 coils.

If you want to stay married - don't bring the coils or the tar anywhere near the house. Heat it with a camp stove preferably outside and use a coffee can bent into a "pitcher" shape and a large pair of pump handle pliers as your handle by grabbing the tin can by the rim with the pliers.

Be careful NOT to heat the tar too much since it can flash over. Have a flat cover to put over the can if that happens which will instantly put the fire out. As you heat the tar all will be fine until it is all melted then continued heat will cause the stuff to really start smoking and stinking and flash over will eventually happen if you continue to heat it. That means you should have poured it already before that. Just be careful and not spill it on yourself by staying away from the camp stove and pitcher vessel while you pick it up and pour it. Put your coils near the floor and your camp stove too and pour carefully since if too hot it gets really runny and spills easily. If near the floor it can't do you as much harm. If I have scared you off then don't try it. Obey your instincts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Anthonie Boer --- Klaaswaal NL on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 03:04 pm:

John ; what is the max temperature of the tar, for the capacitors and the sec. spool.
Thanks for your answer.

1209S

Toon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 03:15 pm:

BLACK BLACK BLACK


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 03:56 pm:

Found on the web, seems hot fluid tar is around 185-205 degrees F.

TYPE III STEEP ASTM D 312
Data Sheet
AP-T3
2008 Gardner-Gibson, Inc.
Manufactured by / Fabricado por:
Gardner-Gibson, Inc
P.O. Box 5449, Tampa, FL 33675
Weight Per Gallon, lbs. 9.0-10.0 lbs.
Application Temperatures See EVT


Softening Point (ASTM D36)
Min.185F
Max. 205F

Flash Point (ASTM D92) 560F


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - West Melbourne Florida on Monday, October 01, 2018 - 07:08 pm:

Thank you John, James and Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Tuesday, October 02, 2018 - 08:05 pm:

I see I did not answer all of the questions. The temperature that I try hard NOT to exceed is about 300-350 degrees F. When melting tar for pouring into a coil I always heat up a fair amount so that I can pour an entire box full in one pour. Now what is tricky is if you heat the tar until ALL of the tar is melted then it very very quickly after that point is way hotter than it needs to be. This causes fuming, smoke, and a lot of bubbling of the tar in the box as you pour. This tar is also super thin and the bubbling of the tar causes a lot of spatter outside and ON the box parts. What I do is to use a flat "paint stir" stick to push the tar around in the can as I am heating it and feeling for a lump of unmelted tar still in the can. My observation is that if there is a lump in the tar but enough of it has melted to fill a box then it is the perfect time to pour. The unmelted tar lump is sucking up most of the heat at that time but once that lump is totally melted then very quickly the tar is too hot and too thin. I have lumps of cold tar waiting to drop into the pot and I put them in there once I have poured off all of the tar needed to fill a box and there is not enough left to fill another box. Thus at all times I try to keep a lump in the can and it acts as a temperature control. It isn't the end of the world if I don't have enough tar to fill a box after I have started to pour since I can add some more even after the first "layer" has cooled a bit but it is way less messy to keep the tar nice and somewhat thick when pouring so that it fills up to the brim of the box without going over. Cooling tar almost always results in shrinkage so don't panic if it appears that you put too much tar in there since if it does not spill over when hot it will be less volume when it cools and you probably have it about right. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Tuesday, October 02, 2018 - 08:53 pm:

If you pour in enough to stabilize all wires and the new condenser. do you really need to fill the coil any farther??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 - 03:34 am:

I agree with Hal, though I usually also insert some small pieces of wood across the gap where the old condenser was.
I just re-use the old tar I dug out. Why do anything else?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 - 04:02 am:

You need to cover the coil in tar, and it acts as a heat sink. If you don't you can get arcing or excess heating.... I know from experience.


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