New Fuel Line Pack Nut

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: New Fuel Line Pack Nut
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie Rathbone on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 09:31 pm:

Waited a week for Lang's to UPS my order. Got be it today Yae ! The pack nuts are beautiful. The only problem is the holes are way to small !!! Guess it would just be wrong to make them right..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Lang, MA on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 09:44 pm:

Hello Willie.

The fuel line should be 1/4" what is the size of the hole in the pack but you received from us?

If it is less than the 1/4" we can definitely get one that is the correct size for you.

Thank You Steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Reid Central WI on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 09:45 pm:

Bastard file and a new line and they fit great. Donít ever think you will get away with just screwing it on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Reid Central WI on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 09:56 pm:

Cutter usually leaves a lip on the gas line. Are you using felt or neoprene to seal the coupling? Are you using a new gas line?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie Rathbone on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 10:07 pm:

Nothing personal . I love you guys and Langs are my preferred vendor. It was a little tight for a few different.250 OD lines I had laying around. NBD, a 1/4 drill took care of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Lang, MA on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 10:28 pm:

One thing I'll do tomorrow is check how much clearance there is in the hole.

We won't take it personally :-)

We just like to keep people happy and fix issues when we know about them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 11:29 pm:

That attitude, Mr Lang, is among the reasons why I buy so much from you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 07:38 am:

Yes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Crane on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 08:28 am:

Make the line hole a little small rather than oversize. Drilling/reaming a few thousandths is easy. Making an oversized hole smaller is??

I would also suspect that tubing wall thickness has changed over the last hundred years and many fuel line variations exist.

Better to make the line hole small and allow he purchaser/user to correctly fit it.

Looks to me like the Langs suppler knew what he was doing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 11:01 am:

Over the years I have noticed T gas line nuts can vary a little.
Maybe over time and repeatedly taking them off and on etc.

It could be that the supplier tried to take into account that the nut should fit pretty snug on the gas line.

Makes me now wonder how they fit up on the assembly line.
The original gas lines were steel. So if anything was to wear it would be the nut since its brass and a bit softer than the steel line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 11:16 am:

All of the original gas line nuts were not steel. Do your home work!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Gagel, Orange,Ct on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 12:00 pm:

Larry, reread the previous message.
John stated steel lines, and brass nuts.
I had to slightly enlarge the hole to make it fit also. No big deal for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 12:03 pm:

Larry:

Put on your glasses!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 12:26 pm:

I don't know about later models but the 1915 parts book lists the feed pipe, or fuel line as it's now called, as brass. I know brass work hardens and cracks so people use steel. I've got a couple steel pack nuts and inlet elbows but they're not near as common.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 02:15 pm:

Easy way to get them the way you want them is to:

1: Buy a lathe

2: Learn to run it

3: Buy a correct sized tap drill for brass

4: Buy a set of 1/2 x 18 SPT taps @$41.00 each. You will need two. A taper to start the thread and a bottom tap for finishing the threads. (I just bought a set from MSC yesterday.) You will also need a set of chamfer cutters or countersinks for the large and small ends to make sure they are finished exactly the way Ford did it. Another $50 if you buy good ones. You will also need an edge cutter so you can taper both the front and back edge after it has been threaded and cut off. Another $30-40 bucks.

5: Buy a correct sized brass drill to drill the hole for the steel or brass or copper gas line. You will also need a .260 reamer to get the correct oversize to clear all the line sizes. $20 for the drill and $40 for the reamer should do it.

6: Buy a 72 inch stick of 5/8 #260 brass hex for $100 + shipping.

8: Buy a cutoff tool

9: Make your own + do a production run so you have them in stock at all times so you can instantly fill and order for one.

10: Sell them for $5 each -- Make the big bucks!!

You will, of course, need all sorts of small tools to make it all work, flap disk wheels for finishing, etc., etc., boxes for packing + time to deal with invoices, packaging, answering emails, calls, monitoring the forum to see who is complaining, trips to the post office, etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 02:33 pm:

Where do I sign up, Stan ?!?! lol

I run copper line...FWIW

When I put the Stromberg on, I cut it, found a hose fitting to replace the 90 that was on it and put a piece of hose between it.
The original line was crimped down from the packing and nut, about 1/2 the size. Don't overtighten the nut if you use brass or copper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 02:49 pm:

Stan

So very true...Only thing I'd add is:

11. Wait for someone to quickly make the same part of inferior material and workmanship and price it at $4.95
12. Have family sell your merchandise for scrap upon your demise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 03:33 pm:

There you go!! I was sitting on my shop stool listening to a guy tell me all about whatever he was talking about and looking at my brass stock pile. I did a quick count of the brass prices I could remember starting with the 1 1/4 hex I use to make the U & J and Holley G bowl nuts. Last I bought was about $165 for a 36 inch stick. I think it's up over $200 if you buy the American made.

There is at least a couple thousand bucks worth of brass hex leaning up again the wall and another several hundred of brass round stock. Plus Aluminum for venturis, copper, steel etc. I dunno how much of that there is but a bunch.

The auctioneer will probably just throw it all in a pile at my estate auction.

I have virtually every thread size tap and die from 4-40 to 1 1/4 x 24, I go through two or three 8-32 and 1/4 32 dies every year. Silicon Bronze -- which is what the adjustment shafts are made from are about $40 each for the good ones and the Silicon just eats them up threading on the lathe.

Some of the odd ball sizes are $75-100 for the dies plus another $50 for the taps.

Something else I should have mentioned is that no matter how carefully you research any part there will be some expert who will either correct you or question you as to why you made the part that way instead of correctly. Or the way they perceive "correctly" which usually means that it should fit whatever they have, whether it is correct or not.

That's why I sell very few parts. It takes as time and effort to invoice and pack a $5 or $10 part that I spend time making, storing, etc, as it does a $1000 carburetor.

Also, the guy who has a problem or concern with his carburetor will probably call and talk to me, ask what he did wrong when he installed and adjusted it whereas the guy that buys the $5 part will post his complaint on the forum.

Know that story yet, Scott?

I like this business but it's like a lot of things, there is more to it than meets the eye.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 10:40 am:

As far as I know, and Regan can verify this, the gas lines were always brass, but tin plated, so they look like a steel line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 11:26 am:

I really donít care for this sort of thing: A customer perceives a problem with a part and immediately rants about it on a public forum INSTEAD OF first contacting the vendor...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 12:55 pm:

I concur Adam !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman, Rochester, NY on Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 02:36 pm:

Yes, seemed to be quick on the trigger. You should always give the vendor a call and talk it over. In this case the answer seems to be ... "just chase it with a 1/4" file .. they are made that way on purpose."


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