Cleaning carbon out of exhaust manifold

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Cleaning carbon out of exhaust manifold
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 09:09 pm:

I need to clean the carbon out of the exhaust manifold of my 1917 Overland. There is quite a lot of build-up of carbon in port 1. I began beadblasting the exterior today and the blaster that I am using will only blast so far in to remove it. Can I do this myself or should I take it to a shop? What is the most effective way of doing this? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 09:12 pm:

Old speedo cable in drill. Flay the working end out some.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim R. Wynn on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 09:20 pm:

I have had success using kerosene and a flexible bottle brush (baby bottle brush) for those hard to reach places when cleaning. I don't know how your manifold is configured but I would let it soak in the kerosene for a time to allow the deposited carbon to soften.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 03:49 pm:

Wire rope, cut the ends for the cable to separate, spin in power drill, cuts away the old rust great.



Exhaust heat baked on carbon has to be mechanically removed, my experience with solvents didn't touch that baked on carbon and rust :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 04:02 pm:

It's pretty high tech for the home mechanic, but extrusion honing is neat stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCFKV_qRr54


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Instness on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 04:44 pm:

I have heard stories of smoothing out the inside of manifolds by partially filling them with an abrasive (sand etc...) sealing off the holes, strapping it to the wheel of another model T and going for a drive. Might work for this though I can't say I have ever tried it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 07:05 pm:

Did you ever wonder why no one questions the constant build up of carbon in the exhaust manifold, combustion chamber and spark plugs?? I think it was even in the original service recommendations that at specific intervals the head should be removed and the carbon cleaned out. As well, regular removal and de-carbonizing the plugs is still common. Problem is/was that the original carburetors were very crude and a poor design in trying to provide the correct mixture for all conditions from idle to wide open throttle, from a puddle of gas with a wick. Compounding this is the fact that lots of guys don't really know or care too much about adjusting the mix as long as the car still runs. No wonder the aftermarket guys took advantage of a poor situation and provided real carburetors. Anyone that has tried a Stromberg OF or RF will know what I mean. Anyway as long as you like the black smoke ,washed down cylinder walls, carboned up motors and want to maintain originality there's nothing wrong with the originals, but they are the culprit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 07:33 pm:

Dan:

You don't think what the machine shop calls a "hot flush" will work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 07:40 pm:

Has anyone tried burning out the carbon from an exhaust manifold by throwing it on the fire? Or using a cutting torch?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim R. Wynn on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 09:13 pm:

The Buffum Tool Company of Louisiana, MO designed and produced 3 different tools specifically designed for removing carbon deposits without removing the head. The tools are shaped to allow use through the spark plug hole. Their catalogue states that they were designed for use on Ford cars. The company went out of business in the early 20s, so one can assume they could be used on the Model T. If anyone interested, send pm for photos.


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