Front Brakes For Fords

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Front Brakes For Fords
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Walters on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 09:33 pm:

I wonder how many of these are still in use and how well they worked. A neat accessory for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 09:52 pm:

Don’t understand why they are only for Fords? Looks like they would easily fit on another car....

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 10:14 pm:

Definitely worth $37.50 !!

Willis, I think most other car makes already had 4 wheel brakes, Henry was just a little stubborn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, November 07, 2018 - 11:59 pm:

I’m getting close to having a set of McNerny on my ‘13. It has been a struggle as I started with the broken remains of a original set for the front axle. But certainly I have enjoyed the challenge of making them to be as authentic as I can accomplish


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 11:14 am:

The original wishbone radius rods were not meant for brakes on the front wheels. If you put brakes on the front wheels, consider doubling up on the wishbone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 11:43 am:

The Model A had a beefier radius rod and also connected both above and below the axle. The flywheel housing on an A was also much stronger than the crankcase on a T.

Even with all that strengtening the A brakes were made to just slow the wheel but not lock up.

It is very important that both front brakes be adjusted exactly the same and that the application does not change the castor of the front wheels in order to maintain control of the steering.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 05:14 pm:

I’ve been running front brakes on my ‘27 for 6 years now. I made a radius rod “doubler” that clamps onto the top of the axle and is attached to the stock radius rod. It is adjustable for caster.
The stock oil pan has survived just fine.
Handling on my car is really easy and nice
The brakes are cable operated mechanical


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Kaminar on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 05:59 pm:

Norman has a good point that the brakes must be adjusted equally. The center lines of the king pins on a Model T are inside the center of tires. This means that a turning force is applied to the steering when applying the brakes. If one side is pulling a little more than the other the car will tend to turn towards that side. Later cars that were designed for front wheel brakes have the center line of the king pins more towards the center of the wheels.

One other point: The weight is transferred to the front wheels when braking, so the front brakes do more work than the rear ones.

There have been several threads on the Forum in the past about putting brakes from small cars, like the Metropolitan, on the front.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 06:38 pm:

On my ‘27 I solved the problem of steering pull by making new spindles and inclining the kingpins in by 9 degrees. The spindles have 11 degrees of camber so the car looks right with the wheels leaning out very slightly
On my ‘13 project where I’m installing the 10” McNerny front brakes it will have a reproduction era correct Ross cam and lever steering box. This box is essentially “non reversible “ so uneven braking loads should be quite manageable.
Now when I say “era correct “ I may be taking a bit of liberty with the truth, as my car is RHD, and I m doubtful that Ross actually produced a RH version of their steering box. So a little “poetic license “ in the interest of safety!!
The box was a new experience in casting one that was first 3D printed in plastic and then investment cast in bronze. Making the oddball worm gear was easy with CNC machinery (it is the reverse pitch of the ordinary LHD one)
Lots of fun!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, November 08, 2018 - 09:09 pm:

I copied the McNerny patent with some Big Four ideas thrown in with the cables and used a pulley for an equalizer. I've never had any issues with pulling to one sire or the other with many miles on several tours.

Now, of course, I haven't had too many times around here where I had any ice or snow pack on the shoulder of the road.

IMHO any early driver car needs a wishbone doubler for safety.


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