Floor plan for Model T Plant

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Floor plan for Model T Plant
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 09:50 pm:

Does anyone have a floor plan of a 1920’s Model T factory showing the different stations and the order in which Model T's were assembled and the points at which the various stages came together until the Model T was driven out of the factory? Thank you. Jim Patrick

PS. I am aware that the Ford plant was massive and such a floor plan would require several pages.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 10:59 pm:

Try looking at a copy of “The Ford Methods and the Ford Shop” by H.L. Arnold and F.L. Faurote, The Engineering Magazine, 1915. While it is dated 1914-15, it thoroughly describes the layout of the moving assembly line. It is fully illustrated with photographs.

It is now part of the public domain and can be downloaded off the internet.

Respectfully Submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 08:16 am:

Probably not what your looking for but if you can find a copy of the Ford Industries it will show the huge scale of Ford at the time.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 09:47 am:

Jim

Just too massive to have detail floor plans.

The Highland Park plant was the largest auto factory in the world!




Original external with pointers of operation areas.




Later view with expansions, on the left is the Executive / Sales building that is still standing and under re-development.



Only a few structures left at the Highland Park site now, power house and most gone, only a few of the outer building are in use for some commercial purposes, all leased out by Ford.



Interior view of Sales Building, fancy in the day, worn down now but multi-million $ rehab underway. Was able to tour this site during a MTFCI annual meeting.



Historical marker on the most famous factory site that was.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:14 am:

Sorry Dan but i'm sure there was/perfect detailed floor plains at the time.When Ford was shipping cars by the trainload every day because there was no space to store them at the factory or branch plants.I think there were many running around with Stop Watches doing time study of each pice so Ford did not manage floor space? I realize Old's was not Ford but doing some work in a office at Old's we found a large room with detailed models of almost everything in the plant.We might never find or see them but Ford had those drawings! Bud DeLong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:27 am:

There are some very good pictures of crankshaft machines and press lines in Tin Lizzie by Stern. At the time of the overhead line shafts for power things were thought out well in advance.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:54 am:

Kenneth

Agree, just assembling those floor plans for Highland Park plant would be tough! Benson Ford Research Center likely has these on microfilm, don't know of any link on the web so show them, one would have to assemble this and what a chore!

Jim's request was for floor plan of a 1920’s Model T factory. Don't know if he wanted a branch assembly factory, or the main Highland Park. Was posting about Highland Park.

Now this layout isn't '1920's' but is dated 1914.



These were the early years of the chassis assembly lines, in this drawing, 3 lines in operation. But note the chutes and conveyors used to deliver sub assemblies made on other floors on other smaller sub- assembly lines.




Highland Park

Of course the later 1920's at branches, the process was very similar, feeding the parts for the chassis and body along the lines, using overhead conveyors as in use today in modern auto factories.


Assembly Branch factory


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:58 am:

Keep digging guys!

There is one for Rouge. Not an actual floor plan, rather a flow diagram, i’ve Seen it...just don’t have a copy of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kenneth w delong on Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 11:08 am:

Dan,It would be easy if we could convince Rob there is still a hidden racer in the basement of the powerhouse!Happy Thanksgiving.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Friday, November 23, 2018 - 04:50 pm:

Jim, if I remember correctly, I think it's Bob Casey's Model T book that has a floor and flow plan with stages indicated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, November 23, 2018 - 05:10 pm:

If I plant seeds from a Model T will they sprout into mini T’s?
Just wondering about plants


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Saturday, November 24, 2018 - 03:36 pm:

Mr Trent Boggess mentions a pamphlet circa 1915 “The Ford Methods and the Ford Shop” by H.L. Arnold and F.L. Faurote, The Engineering Magazine, 1915, as a source for plans/information on the Ford Plan. By 1914 Henry Ford was becoming, if not the premiere automobile manufacturing leader in America.

Before the Engineering Magazine covered Ford's success, Automobile Trader carried an extensive profile on Ford and his business, Automobile Trade Journal, April 1914. The Ford Achievement, by Hugh Dolnar, pp115 - 165

Automobile Trader, 1914 published this concept of the Ford plant:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Saturday, November 24, 2018 - 04:51 pm:

So the Brass cars with the white tires 1913?
The black cars 1921?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Saturday, November 24, 2018 - 06:43 pm:

1914, rear crossmember beyond the frame rails.


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