New to the Hobby and a 1920 Restoration

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: New to the Hobby and a 1920 Restoration
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 04:32 pm:

I have seen a couple of newbies introduce themselves recently so I thought I would do the same. I am in my early 40s and have been collecting and restoring hit and miss engines as well as pre-1930 tractors since I was in college back in the mid-1990s. This the first time I have touched a Model T; however, I did grow up looking at this car. This touring model was purchased (presumably) new by my Great-Uncle in 1920, converted into a farm truck in the 1930s, and was in running condition until 1955 when my Grandfather purchased it from his uncle. Grandpa drove the car home to the farm and parked it a shed which is where it remained until 1988. That was the year we built a new shop and shed, so the car was moved outside for a few months, and then moved back into the new shed. It sat there until my father and I started working on it last November. We have had the engine and transmission rebuilt, new radiator, had the wheels done by Stutzman, and I just received my new Touring Body from Raymond Wells of CA. I have also just joined a local T club and my buddy, whos body shop is doing the painting on the car, hosts a Model T University every January. This year our car is going to be a first start-up feature since we have not actually tried to start it since the rebuild.

Thought I would share.

Randy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 04:33 pm:

The guy in the first picture is my buddy Billy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 04:38 pm:

Very cool. I love it when one comes back to life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 05:20 pm:

EXCELLENT !!
Looks good, welcome to the infliction !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 05:31 pm:

Great progress so far. If you keep it up should be ready for driving by next Spring!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 05:34 pm:

Hi Randy, Welcome to the Model T Hobby and to the Dairyland Tin Lizzies. I'm looking forward to seeing your first time start-up at the January Model T University. BTW, You've got a good friend in Billy and the others at the body shop.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 05:37 pm:

Welcome to the Model T Family, Randy. Your car is looking good!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 05:42 pm:

You're in for a whale of a good time. Glad to have you join in the fun.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 06:37 pm:

Thanks everyone! Here is the letter showing my Grandfather and his brother buying the Model T for $20.00 in December of 1955.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 07:08 pm:

Oh and a shameless plug for Bill and Dan Vrana doing the body work. This picture was taken two weeks ago when the new body arrived from Ray Wells. Man he does impressive work!!! The other photo is Dan holding the crate after we first opened it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rodell, Sr.- Wisconsin on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 09:15 pm:

The touring body looks great!!!!!
I am looking forward to seeing that new engine start up next month.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Billy Vrana Kewaskum wi on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 10:51 pm:

About 2 years ago Randy called me over to help him assemble his Hart-Parr after an overhaul. Looking over that touring like I did every time I was there he told me "Marshall (Randy's dad) says that's next on the restoration list". Followed by some grumbling as he would rather find another tractor to do. A couple days later I stopped by with my T and showed him how to drive it, next thing you know hes got all his kids in there driving around the section. Yep hooked em good,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Friday, December 07, 2018 - 11:58 pm:

Grumble - ha that's an understatement! But you and Dad sure did hook me into this!! Read that post just after I installed the Stromberg OF I just got today. Had to buy a carb anyway so I figured I get the one everyone speaks so highly of. So thanks to everyone's collective wisdom!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 07:24 am:

Welcome aboard Randy. I'm a few years older than you and bought my first T a couple years ago. Like you, I expect to have mine running early in 2019 after a lot of work.

Your car has a great story. I love seeing old family cars saved and used. It amazes me that, 100 years after they were made, Model T's continue to be resurrected for their first major rebuild.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 09:29 pm:

Well my Dad showed me some photos he just rediscovered and it proves memories are not reliable! I was 12 when we built the new shop so I got the story wrong. We actually built the new shop around the old shop as you can see in the photo. So this car has been in our shed since 1955! Great photo of it. My Dad did begin to restore it back in the 60s or 70s but he can tell that story in a post.

The second photo is dated May of 1916 and is a picture of my Great Grandparents in their Model T parked in front of their house, which is now my house. 6 generations of our family have lived here. I don't know if the date is accurate but I am sure you will be able to verify the year of the car for us.

Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rodell, Sr.- Wisconsin on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 09:40 pm:

Randy,It looks like they got a new 1914 touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 09:47 pm:

Late 1914.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rodell, Sr.- Wisconsin on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 09:50 pm:

The carbide generator is missing, but it appears that the head lamps were converted to electric lamps.
Beautiful photo.
Your next project could be a 1914 like your great grandparents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 10:31 pm:

Randy Have your body & paint people duplicate the half moon notch at the upper cowl panel where the rod between the radiator and the firewall can come inward during service, look at the original cowl. Would you share what the body cost?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Monday, December 10, 2018 - 09:59 am:

George I'm really new at this so I don't know what you are asking about the half moon notch. Sorry. As far as the cost, Ray Wells has all his prices listed for all his rebuilds on his site - here it is: http://www.the-craftsman.biz/images/Craftsman_Price_022217.pdf

The money I spent was WELL WORTH IT! I priced out a wood kit, $2,700, plus what it would cost to marry together two sets of sheet metal to get one just "ok" set, plus the time it would take to assemble the wood and fit it properly, plus the time of hanging the sheet metal too. This is not in my area of expertise and considering I want to drive this car BEFORE retirement this seemed like the cheapest and fastest route. I am SO impressed with the construction of the body. Plus, Ray is a SUPER nice guy and really easy to work with! No problems with this purchase at all. And all done through the phone, US Mail, and checks! Hope this helps.

Randy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Monday, December 10, 2018 - 11:14 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Monday, December 10, 2018 - 12:28 pm:

Thanks Ed, what should I do about this? Do I really need it? Still learning a lot!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Monday, December 10, 2018 - 12:31 pm:

Just grind out the notch, right, think I got it....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Monday, December 10, 2018 - 06:42 pm:

Stopped by the shop tonight and saw these holes in the front seat back rest sheet metal. Wondering what they are for? Should we fill them in? Or does every T have them? Figured since you all know so much and are willing to help I would ask. Thanks again everyone!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Tuesday, December 11, 2018 - 09:46 am:

Randy those holes should have been welded shut before the seat back panel was installed. They were used as a guide on where that panel was cut from 2 directions. I looked at my 20 touring car today it does not have those holes, mine has a Fisher body, have you looked at the original body at the right hand floor board riser for letters and numbers that may indicate what company built the original body?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Reysen on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 08:13 pm:

Thanks for the insight George, we are going to close them up. As for the number on the body we don't have it anymore, it as traded to reduce the overall cost of the new body. Here are some pictures of what's been going on. Last weekend we got the body on the frame, very good fit! Now we are working on fitting everything and bolting it tight. Once we know all the sheet metal is happy and fits as it should we will disassemble for painting and reassembly. Merry Happy Chrismahanakwanzica to all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 10:20 pm:

It's starting to look a lot like Christmas, and a Model T !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 07:54 pm:

Welcome to the club. Car is looking great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Vern (Vieux Carre) on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 08:05 pm:

black balloon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry K. Lee on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 09:38 pm:

Very NICE Randy!

Hank in Tin-A-See


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, December 25, 2018 - 12:00 pm:

I appreciate Ed posting the cowl photos. That notch is something many folks who have converted later T's have overlooked, and is the first thing I look for when looking over 1915's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Hand on Tuesday, December 25, 2018 - 12:35 pm:

I do not see where the notch has been made yet!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Billy Vrana Kewaskum wi on Thursday, December 27, 2018 - 10:06 am:

What is the reason for the notch? Could anyone give me a measurement of how low that notch is from the edge of the cowl? I'm guessing the radiator support rod should be level or parallel with the frame, I appreciate any help I can get,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Thursday, December 27, 2018 - 12:49 pm:

Billy

it is to clear the head on the radiator support rod so that it may be withdrawn to allow for easier removal of engine. From your bio, I see that you have a vehicle that would have such a cutout. Remove the lid from your coil box and you'll see it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, December 27, 2018 - 07:06 pm:

I am not familiar with the way US bodies are built, so this may not apply. The photo of the left side showing the front seat backrest and the side panel seems to have some kind of seam sealer to close the gap normally seen at this point. As soon as the body flexes, the paintwork will crack and open up an untidy join. I can see why a body shop would seal this join, being unfamiliar with the wracking a T body undergoes. If it was my car I would open up the join and let it move. The right side is not sealed like the left.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


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