How to Use Spindle Reamer

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: How to Use Spindle Reamer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Namdc3 on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 04:51 pm:

I just bought this KR Wilson spindle bolt reamer for $10. I figured it was worth a $10 gamble on whether or not it was worn out or dull. The dark spots are just discoloration, not rough or raised material. Here's a couple images from a 1926 KR Wilson tool catalog, too. Mine has spiral flutes and the photo shows straight, but mine is marked KR Wilson, Buffalo, NY so I'm sure it is. The entry end is 0.474". The cutting flutes are about 0.500" or maybe a little more. It's difficult to measure what hole they'll cut. I think it would be best to ream a hole and measure the hole rather than trust my flute measurement. I gather they should be 0.504" for 0.503" spindle bolts.

Anyway, I searched the archives and saw several methods people are using to line ream the bushings. What is the procedure for using this particular tool. I gather from the ad that there is no centering cone for the backside. Here's my assumption:

1) Press both new bushings in (first ensuring the press fit of the bushings isn't too large)

2) Insert the reamer through one bushing and into the other.

3) Ream the first bushing and continue in same direction to ream the second bushing in the same operation. The top section of the reamer measures about 0.498", so it would center on the first bushing fairly well while you're reaming the second one.

4) Continue with facing bushings, axle yoke, etc.

Correct?

Any idea why the new reamer sold by the vendors has a pilot reamer rather than just a pilot like this one? Does anyone know the ID of the new replacement bushings? Is it larger than 0.475"? If it is, I guess I could use a cone on the backside.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas - Centerville, Iowa on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 05:23 pm:

When I did mine, I was advised to replace one bushing. Then use the existing busing as a guide to ream the new one. After it is reamed, then replace the second one, and use the newly reamed one to center or guide the next one. In other words, just do one at a time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 06:32 pm:

Lang's reamer, https://www.modeltford.com/item/2713RM.aspx requires a pilot/alignment tool https://www.modeltford.com/item/2713RMT.aspx, and is done with bushings, one at a time.

Snyder's reamer, https://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/spindle-bushing-reamer is a true line reamer to be used with two new bushings installed first...

You will note that the Snyder's reamer looks just like the KRW tool.

I have my favorite that I use all the time. It looks like yours.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Namdc3 on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 06:39 pm:

Scott, the Snyder reamer has a starter reamer on the end and the KR doesn't. Not sure why.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 06:46 pm:

You're right, but as I recall it is no larger than the pilot....it's only like 1/2" long. My guess is if the bushing compresses too much and is tight, the little nub of reamer will bring it to pilot size.

My bet is the KRW one is made and assumes the user is using FORD bushings which would have some control of the uninstalled ID/OD whereas I do not know how well or if supplier(s) of bushings control the ID or OD of the new products. I know that periodically I must turn down OD of bushings lest they risk breaking spindles from being too tight (particularly early spindles).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Namdc3 on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 07:27 pm:

What is the acceptable diametric interference of the bushing OD to the spindle ID, 0.001"-0.002"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 07:31 pm:

I take my spindles, bushings, and spindle pins to my local machine shop and have the bushings HONED. Been told by more than one person that honing is better than reaming. Doesn't cost that much either. Just sayin'.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 07:31 pm:

You are in the range with those numbers. For more complete answer I'd go here: https://www.engineersedge.com/calculators/mechanical-tolerances/force-fit-tolera nces.htm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Saturday, December 08, 2018 - 07:41 pm:

If you use the worn bore to pilot the new bushing, the center will be offset. Dave in Bellingham,WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 09:31 am:

Concerning ‘facing’ the bronze bushing flanges: I’ve determined the entire weight of the FRONT of a Model T rests on the upper spindle bolt bushing. And it’s a given that, after pressing in bushings and reaming, the distance from upper to lower flange will be greater than the axle yoke. So I only trim bronze material from the BOTTOM bushing. Is this common practice?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 11:16 am:




The Keystone reamer #2713-14 is for both spindle body and spindle arm bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Namdc3 on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 01:19 pm:

Ford said to face both equally, but I see no reason not to do the bottom only if there's plenty of material.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Sunday, December 09, 2018 - 01:31 pm:

File the underside of the top of the axle yoke square and flat. Face the top bushing until it is square to the spindle axis. Like you suspect, you can quit right there on the top one. I have not yet seen one that you had to take too terribly much to remove from the bottom and finish off nicely.


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