OT Steam bucket rebuilt..

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: OT Steam bucket rebuilt..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 12:07 am:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug6hmnUvTps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 01:10 am:

Thanks, Mark.... and an absolutely fascinating video! The article's comment dates reflect 2013-17, but those haircuts and recovery vehicles would seem to pre-date that by about 20 years, perhaps more. Any information on the initial 'raising'? (We take our time with our projects, too!)

"Happy T-ing!"
Just fix it (right) and make it work....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 02:13 am:

I would place the video in the early 70, re the bell bottom pants and the age of the guy that was one of the last to operate it. Don't have any other info other then what was presented. I found it while watching Steve's video.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 03:45 am:

I agree, 60's or early 70's. The tow truck used in the beginning to remove the bucket and lower the jib was a Diamond T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 07:03 am:

I want to know what became of it? Fix they fix it again or museum it? There's got to be more to the story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 07:45 am:

It was recovered in 1976.
It is at the Threlkeld Mining Museum- scroll to the bottom to see it there today.


https://www.threlkeldquarryandminingmuseum.co.uk/vintage-excavator-trust/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 08:14 am:

There's a crack in turntable that prevents it from running again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 08:14 am:

Unless they've fixed it since the video...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 08:26 am:

Thank you for the video link. It was fun to watch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 09:20 am:

There's still a cultural difference between 'memories and memorabilia', isn't there. Makes me recall Edward R. Murrow - "You are there".

"Happy T-ing!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 09:41 am:

A little more local to us, Rough & Tumble in Kinzers, PA has an operating shovel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trAXkOKwPZ4

Make no mistake about it -- as romantic as it seems, operating that thing is hard work. Watching them in there cooking on a hot August day makes you grateful that you're merely an observer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 12:34 pm:

There's an Erie Steam Shovel at Dentonn Farm Park in North Carolina. Built in 1916


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 05:33 pm:

GREAT VIDEOS!

They are hot, noisy, smell of burnt metal, will coat you with asbestos dust from the brake linings, fill your lungs and taste buds with diesel fumes and the cable grease will splatter you good, but draglines were my dad's favourite machine!

He probably owned a dozen of his own and leased a few more over the years but I dont think any of my brothers (and certainly not I!) ever became proficient on any of them because he couldnt take more than a few minutes of us trying to operate one before we got thrown out of the cab and he took the controls.

They are somewhat of a lost art now, but a good operator (and my dad with 60 years experience was the best I ever saw) can sling a 1.5 yard bucket with the grace of a fly fisherman setting a Royal Coachman on the opposite bank of a river!

He was running his Murphy powered Northwest "40" digging a pond when he died at 80 years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 06:27 pm:

Oh. I thought someone was going to be sent to get a bucket of steam


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Fielding "Ewe-taw" on Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - 07:02 pm:

Most impressive is the Osgood at Rollag MN, it is as big as an old time railcar.
I can't imagine riding the jib all day to trip the bucket.
Enjoy,
Kevin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1RgiN52TCg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 03:18 am:

The voice-over in the video is by Fred Dibnah, he died a couple of years ago, but was a very special guy who made a series of documentaries for the BBC about steam and other old technology. He was some character !
All his stuff can be found on youtube, he was an amazing man and one of the last ones to master the art of fixing factory smokestacks (chimney's).
Just Google 'Fred Dibnah' you'll find it.
You should watch his work on the youtube, great stuff !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 09:14 am:

Here's a video about mr Dibnah, the last "Steeplejack" in the UK.
His accent takes a bit getting used to, to say the least, but it's an incredible story about his eventfull life and character !
Must watch !,
https://youtu.be/QTv1a_nACCs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leo van Stirum, NL on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 09:32 am:

One about his greatest love: his Steam Tractor
https://youtu.be/jC2L29BdQH4
enjoy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 10:04 am:

Abandoned Marion:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNKA-f2VYdI


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 12:27 pm:

FWIW, some years ago History Ch or Discovery did a segment on the recovery of an original Panama Canal steam shovel that was later used in the western USA to mine gold and than abandoned, Part of the removal from the mine site involved bringing in an industrial air compressor and using air to power the shovel to a place where it could be loaded on a flatbed. The shovel was placed in a static display, which is not terribly interesting to me, I'd rather see them restored and operating. Perhaps the steam shovel experts here know more about this digger. I enjoyed all of your videos-thanks for posting. jb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 12:37 pm:

Nice video R.V. Thanks. I had family work at Marion Power Shovel...that was the name of the factory that built them. We would drive right by the plant every time my family took a trip to Marion to both sets of grandparents. Good old days. It's a shame it was left there to decay away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Smith on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 01:00 pm:

It is surprising sometimes to see the old mining equipment around when you are out in rural areas. I am guessing there are a lot of pieces in what are now lakes when they finished with a pit and quit dewatering. They were considered used up or paid for equipment that made its money and became a cost to move or scrap. I would love to retrieve some that I know of, but it is a labor of love and significant effort/cost for some as small as 50-70 thousand pounds let alone some of the bigger stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Thursday, December 20, 2018 - 02:01 pm:

A couple months ago I found a copy of "Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel" and I even found a wooden toy of Mary Ann. I've been in love with them since I was a kid & watched Captain Kangaroo read that book on tv. The book & shovel will be birthday gifts to my grandson this spring.


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