Need modern oil seal help.........

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: Need modern oil seal help.........
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 03:13 pm:

I just destroyed my brand new modern camshaft oil seal, trying to seat it. I checked it before assembly and it slid on the shaft end with some oil, but took a bit of wiggling to get it started. Now, with the engine front plate installed I have no "wiggle room". Is there some trick to seating one of these?

Thanks in advance and Merry Christmas!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 03:37 pm:

Did you align the front cover with the proper tool ? The large O.D. tool - not the small O.D. one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 03:44 pm:

Proper alignment is also necessary for the timer to work correctly. If the plate and cam shaft are aligned, the seal should fit in much easier.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 04:16 pm:

George when it comes to these situations a picture speaks a thousand words. Always snap a pic of the issue your having and post it with your question, it takes a lot of guess work out of the answers you will receive. Just trying to help :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Gregory on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 05:29 pm:

I just did the same thing ! Gotta order another. I used the centering tool which worked great. I also greased up everything but I destroyed the seal. A Model T guy on FB told me to cut a piece of aluminum from a Coke can...roll it and slid it through the seal, place the end of the roll on the cam shaft and then press it home. The aluminum roll keeps the seal from hanging on the shoulder of the shaft. Should work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie Rathbone on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 05:29 pm:

I have done a few engines and never used the tool. What I find is the cover has almost zero wiggle room once a new front crank rope seal is installed. It's all one can do just to get the bolts started. I guess I have been lucky to have the alignment be as good as it was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 05:37 pm:

Gary Gregory just described it really well.

Cut a piece of a can about 2-3" wide and about 5-6" long, then wrap it around the end of the camshaft.

It's like you're slipping the seal over the outside a narrow funnel, and the end of the camshaft is inside the funnel, so you don't have to deal with the sharp edge of the camshaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 07:21 pm:

Willie

with the rope seal and no centering tool, you are most certainly off center. With that seal, you need two stout steel bars and c-clamps to pull the cover "down" against the rope seal/crank shaft and get the bottom of the cover flush with the bottom of the crank case.

If you run a face-type timer the effect is not really measurable but if you run a stock type peripheral contact timer, you're losing performance with the cover offset.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 10:52 am:

Sorry I didn't get back earlier to thank everyone for their help!

I just discovered this morning that one of the pan gaskets split overnight, so it looks like I'm taking the whole thing apart and starting over. A bit aggravating, but I want it RIGHT.

I decided to make myself a "starting tool" for that oil seal.....a piece of aluminum bored to slide over the outside portion of the cam, with the end a tiny bit larger than the area where the seal sits. That way, I can oil and slide the seal over the sharp edge of the cam until it seats.

Never give up! Never surrender! Merry Christmas to all! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger - Wyoming on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 11:15 am:

George

The cover was not machined with that seal in mind, so while the front cover is off, make sure the seal is a press fit. Often it isn't. A gentle "squash" in the vice or similar, will swell the OD to where it is a snug fit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 11:41 am:

Since you are removing the crankcase, you can loosen the bolts holding the front main bearing so the crankshaft can be lowered just a tad and then align the timing cover with the tool and bolt to the front of the block. Then remember to tighten the bolts holding the bearing cap before you replace the crankcase.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, December 24, 2018 - 09:46 pm:

George, I made a similar tool to slide the seal over the end of the cam nut. It makes that part of the installation easy. Next problem is fitting a seal which is loose in the cover, as Scott mentioned. Rather than squash the seal to make it a tad larger, I fit it with a strip of brass shim around the hole. That is a different challenge!!!!

Allan from down under.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration