"Dad's Trunk - Road Tripping a Model T"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2018: "Dad's Trunk - Road Tripping a Model T"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 02:54 am:

John Lemon had shared this article with me which he'd found from the Hemmings' site, then asked if I'd post it to the Forum like some had suggested. Here goes!

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2018/12/30/dads-trunk-how-road-tripping-a-model-t- taught-him-to-carry-plenty-of-everything/?refer=news

Happy New Year to all (and) "Happy T-ing!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 07:31 am:

Marv,

A nice drive down memory lane, as my Dad also used to pack the truck with the tool box, oil, jacks, chains (if any chance of snow), etc. in the trunk.

And I still have the tools that Dad gave me -- including one of those little stubby screw drivers with the wooden handle.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by Hap_tucker on December 31, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 10:11 am:

That bring back some great memories doesn't it?
Thanks for posting it.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 11:06 am:

Dad was raised by his grandma in horse & buggy days, and had the mechanical touch of death. I don't know that he even owned a car before he was thirty. He was a meticulous expert at carpentry, but watching him change the water distributor on the 1941 Plymouth was pure agony. We traveled with few tools, if any. Fortunately there weren't many breakdowns. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art McTevia on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 11:15 am:

Your dad was very good looking.Did he pass that on?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 11:16 am:

Mom backed her 1927 Chevy through the back of a garage. She also reported the mechanic said the Ham Shaft was bad. She always knew when to shift but never knew which gear was where.
Wonderful lady though.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 11:19 am:

My grandfather was born in 1910 and had a Model T as his first car. I used to make him tell me, over and over, about how he traveled to see my grandmother and had to "tighten up the rods" when he arrived.

He had a set of great old tools that he carried with him. I have a few of them and treasure them like something that came out of King Tut's tomb. My dad's still using the rest of them and asked me recently to come get them.

(Message edited by rustyfords on December 31, 2018)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Govoni Fredericksburg, VA on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 11:20 am:

Funny I do this all the time going to car shows and the amount of stuff increases as I get further away from my house. when I was a kid we called it our bailout box. We had a replacement for just about all the major parts that could go wrong. So far I have never had to get a tow. I've been able to fix what I had. By the way a ladies hair barrette makes a great ballast resistor until you get to the auto parts store. Just ask my wife. I still keep it in my pile of stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 12:13 pm:

Art: Yes, to my brother.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 12:23 pm:

Don - I would have thought that your grandfather would have said that he,....always had to "tighten up the BANDS" when he arrived!

Tightening up the bands was a fairly common and relatively easy operation, however, tightening up the rods would be a much more difficult and time consuming job! (:^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Hanlon N.E.Ohio on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 12:40 pm:

I have listed before everything that my dad had carried with him under the back seat. Short of a complete overhaul, there was not much left out. I added a jack, but I'm sure he had one with him. A piece of material made and fastened between the center top bows to house the curtains. Two hand tool boxes full of any imaginable tool.
I remember trailering it home once, 1 of the aluminum pistons split below the rings...talk about a K Nock !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 01:22 pm:

Not T, but A story; I used to carry some bailing wire as a joke (conversation starter)in the A, then one day in Redding, the muffler fell off (it happens) and I bailing wired it on for the drive home to Dunsmuir (about an hours drive back then). No more joke supply, now a necessity!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 01:59 pm:

David D...me too on my model A!! I had the exhaust pipe fall out from the manifold one day out of the clear blue sky. I wired it up and kept it that way for quite some time before fixing it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 02:17 pm:

Dad was raised as a country farm boy, as myself. Back then we had to fix/repair what we had, there was no extra money to go to the garage and have it done. I used to enjoy working with Dad on projects like replacing brake shoes, and later pulling motors/rebuild/put them back in. Funny, Dad laughed his butt off cause I'd always have a coffee can full of parts left over but the engines ran!!Years later I look back, I was learning to fix/repair most anything. I regret not telling him "Thanks Dad" for all you've taught me. Those trunks with all these parts and tools was sacred ground. We knew better to mess with his trunk layout because he knew exactly what was there "just in case". My brother n' I used to use his tools out of there but had to put them back in the exact place we got them. My god, that stuff in the trunk had to weigh a ton but good traction in the winter!!! When he had to put tire chains on, it was all that bumper jack could do to lift the back end!!! Another "life lesson" that always stuck with me was, he always said, "if you borrow something from someone, ALWAYS bring it back when you said you would, always bring it back as good as if not better than when you borrowed it, you may want to borrow it again sometime". To this day it pisses me off when people don't follow those guidelines, they get the message though the next time it's "unavailable to lend out"!!! He was a "special guy", miss him dearly, will be buried next to him, then I can thank him for all the life lessons he gave me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 03:49 pm:

My Grandfather, a mechanic, carried everything he might need to make a roadside repair including a carburetor, fuel pump, water pump, starter, alternator, spark plugs, points, condenser, cap and rotor, plug wires, oil filter, oil, drain pan, and a full set of tools. I have probably left out a few items. He had a 1966 Chrysler with a huge trunk, so he had the space. If he was on a trip, and the odometer hit 2000 miles, he changed the oil in the motel parking lot that night!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 04:52 pm:

Tim, I blame it (falling off mufflers) on the repros not have a wide enough flange. Now having seen originals, their flange is much wider!
John, Ah yes, borrowing stuff. I borrowed a cement mixer to pour the floor in my garage (boy, I won't do that again-pour the cement that is). Let's see, I repaired the wheels, reset the gears and new thrust washer on the drum, AND then rebuilt the motor with new starter brushes (repulsion-induction motor--it was OLD) and bearings--oh, and a new cord--didn't trust the old one covered in electrical tape. It also went back with much less old caked-on concrete on it then when I got it. The drive pinion bearing needed replacing (rebushing) but I just greased it a lot, figured I'd done enough rebuilding of it by then-and it came to me wore out anyways.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 07:01 pm:

Harold...he passed over 40 years ago, so my memory may be off. In addition to farming and owning a garage, he was also the county Sheriff for a short while.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don - Conroe, TX on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 07:07 pm:

Tim, one of my dad's oft-repeated stories is about when he was in high school (1950's) and was taking his girl out on a date for the first time in his newly acquired 29 Model A coupe.

When he drove over the RR tracks in town, the muffler and exhaust pipe fell off. He was so embarrassed and flustered that he immediately stopped the car, ran back to retrieve the fallen parts and scalded both of his hands badly. He had to cut the date short and drive his girl home where her mother had to doctor his hands.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L. Myers, Greenville on Monday, December 31, 2018 - 09:59 pm:

Could someone please explain the aluminum colored cone shaped thing sticking thru the bulkhead near the spare tire in the first photo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen, Madera California, USA on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 02:01 am:

Dale, I also wondered about the plastic looking cone in the back seat bulkhead next to the spare tire. The car looks like a 1950 Chevy but the wheel is later, so the car is a street rod. A high school friend of mine had a 1950 Chevy Coupe street rod and always had problems getting longer objects into the trunk. My guess is that the cone is a home made pass threw for something like a fishing pole.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Andreasen on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 08:18 am:

You'll notice that his Dad carried Marvel Mystery Oil. A sure recommendation for that product! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins Winnipeg,Canada on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 10:16 am:

To this day the 12 T is loaded with spare parts timers ,bearings ,tubes,coil, belts,polish,rags,nuts ,bolts,bulbs,wire,screws,and an assortment of tools some correct for the car and some that just work. When I am out with the car and a problem comes up I can always find a way to fix her up and get home. As for tools they are a bunch of old tools that range from 1912 to present, that owners before me added to the the car because they worked well so I consider them all to be correct for the car. Happy new year from Winnipeg.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art McTevia on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 12:27 pm:

I think the cone in the bulkhead is to heat the trunk,or to drop your beer can through when you get pulled over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John E Cox on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 03:32 pm:

Harold,
Things are easier when you are young.
My father talked about using bacon rind in the T rod as if it were common on the Missouri farm. He was born in 1909.
When I was a little younger I replaced all of the rod bearings in my freshly overhauled ford six. We were in my sister in laws driveway about 400 miles from home. Ford had bearings that were a couple thousands undersized. The engine was in a motor home and I could hear what I thought was rod noise. It didn't fix it and I learned from the parts man at the Ford dealer that the noise was normal. The tin cover over the valve chamber transmitted the noise.
I new a guy from the Philippines when I was in the navy that had the parts for a complete ford flat head V8 engine in the trunk of his 50 ford. Even the block. This was in the late 50's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele on Tuesday, January 01, 2019 - 11:00 pm:

George I picked up on MM oil immediately. I have a few cans kicking around for old time sake. :-)


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