Thank You

Discuss the vast library of technical drawings in VowellArt.
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Mopar_man
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Thank You

Post by Mopar_man » Wed Feb 20, 2019 8:29 pm

Wow! What a great service to the Model T world. I'm a visual person and these drawings are gold. My 13 year old daughter has expressed an interest in Graphic Art. I've had her take a look at these drawings to sho her how Art assists people in learning. Keep them coming. Oh and lots for 26 touring please. Ha!


CarreyDM
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Re: Thank You

Post by CarreyDM » Mon Sep 21, 2020 10:25 pm

Mopar_man wrote:
Wed Feb 20, 2019 8:29 pm
Wow! What a great service to the Model T world. I'm a visual person and these drawings are gold. My 13 year old daughter has expressed an interest in Graphic Art. I've had her take a look at these drawings to sho her how Art assists people in learning. Keep them coming. Oh and lots for 26 touring please. Ha!
Sounds great! Hope to see the works of your daughter soon.

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VowellArt
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Re: Thank You

Post by VowellArt » Sun Jul 16, 2023 5:13 pm

Mopar_man
Graphic Arts and Technical Arts are two completely different things. Graphic Arts are what you see just about everywhere from billboards to food packaging. Technical Arts, are more defined and usually only seen in Repair Manuals, Parts Manuals and Assembly Instructions of everything from kids toys to rocket engines and ordnance (things that go boom). But the field is also dying, because more and more companies are using computer programs that will automatically render an IPB (Illustrated Parts Breakdown) in either a 2D or 3D drawing from their CAD Engineering drawings effectively wiping out an entire industry and job titling....that of the Technical Illustrator.

I've been doing this for about 45 years now, I've worked in both Aerospace and Ordnance, but I must say, the most enjoyable time in my long career has been doing this, the Model T Ford Chassis from 1909-1927 for the cars and 1918-1927 for the One Ton Truck, the TT, and all factory sanctioned accessories (which there aren't many of them, that we know of or perhaps know of yet). What really confounds me is that nobody has done this before, especially when the home computer came along (it was harder on the board with just pen and ink, but not impossible, I've got a few of those that I had to redraw in the computer). There are a lot of Technical artists and Illustrators who own Model T's yet none of them have ever undertook this project, and believe me every one of them was more than capable. I mean why hadn't any of them whilst either cleaning or repairing parts on their T's ever looked at a piece of it (for me it was my bronze Kingston L-4 Carburetor) and said to themselves,"I could draw this" and then do just that? Maybe what held them back was they didn't understand the mechanics behind the machine itself as hard to believe as that is, because most (if not all) have some training in both electrical and mechanical engineering, I have a mechanical engineering degree and bit of electrical engineering understanding as well....it's not required, but it does help....a lot.

When I started I didn't know much about other Model T's than mine, I now know more about them now and what distinguishes them from production year to production year than I thought I'd ever see. I've actually seen the design changes as they happened in production for the different years and what prompted them and I've also seen the failings that also prompted short run on ideas, that had to change pretty much (and sometimes quite literally) overnight, like the Oil Fill Timer, 8-) :lol:, that changed within 2 weeks and for a good reason too (one that I'm sure that all of the Dealerships with their nice indoor showroom floors were overjoyed at, :lol:).

If your daughter really wants to get into the Arts, have her shoot for the Graphic Artist field. Sure computers have invaded that area as well, but it takes the human touch more to make the drawn graphics real and believable by the humans that will view and enjoy them. And there are so many different options to choose from these days and computer art for games is the major players out there today. And what's even better you can be a real Artist and not have to conform to whatever format identity that has been prescribed for your field (except when the customer dictates it...but usually they don't know what they want and ask for you to make a few samples of your idea....as though doing just one wasn't hard enough, ;) ).

Lots of luck, or you might just do the most logical thing. Become an Electro-Mechanical Engineer! That way you're in control of both the engineering side of the drawing and the CAD generated Iso as well. And should I mention that it pays really well too?

But let me impart this one piece of advice....do whatever you're good at and really love to do for the enjoyment of it, then make it your profession as well. That way it will be fun and not something you do that just to pays the bills, because when you look at everything that way, it becomes something you enjoy doing....and as i always say....Fun Never Quits!
Fun never quits!

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Topic author
Mopar_man
Posts: 1116
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:24 pm
First Name: Robert
Last Name: Govoni
* REQUIRED* Type and Year of Model Ts owned: 1926 Touring
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
MTFCA Number: 32331
Board Member Since: 2016

Re: Thank You

Post by Mopar_man » Mon Aug 28, 2023 3:30 pm

VowellArt wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2023 5:13 pm
Mopar_man
Graphic Arts and Technical Arts are two completely different things. Graphic Arts are what you see just about everywhere from billboards to food packaging. Technical Arts, are more defined and usually only seen in Repair Manuals, Parts Manuals and Assembly Instructions of everything from kids toys to rocket engines and ordnance (things that go boom). But the field is also dying, because more and more companies are using computer programs that will automatically render an IPB (Illustrated Parts Breakdown) in either a 2D or 3D drawing from their CAD Engineering drawings effectively wiping out an entire industry and job titling....that of the Technical Illustrator.

I've been doing this for about 45 years now, I've worked in both Aerospace and Ordnance, but I must say, the most enjoyable time in my long career has been doing this, the Model T Ford Chassis from 1909-1927 for the cars and 1918-1927 for the One Ton Truck, the TT, and all factory sanctioned accessories (which there aren't many of them, that we know of or perhaps know of yet). What really confounds me is that nobody has done this before, especially when the home computer came along (it was harder on the board with just pen and ink, but not impossible, I've got a few of those that I had to redraw in the computer). There are a lot of Technical artists and Illustrators who own Model T's yet none of them have ever undertook this project, and believe me every one of them was more than capable. I mean why hadn't any of them whilst either cleaning or repairing parts on their T's ever looked at a piece of it (for me it was my bronze Kingston L-4 Carburetor) and said to themselves,"I could draw this" and then do just that? Maybe what held them back was they didn't understand the mechanics behind the machine itself as hard to believe as that is, because most (if not all) have some training in both electrical and mechanical engineering, I have a mechanical engineering degree and bit of electrical engineering understanding as well....it's not required, but it does help....a lot.

When I started I didn't know much about other Model T's than mine, I now know more about them now and what distinguishes them from production year to production year than I thought I'd ever see. I've actually seen the design changes as they happened in production for the different years and what prompted them and I've also seen the failings that also prompted short run on ideas, that had to change pretty much (and sometimes quite literally) overnight, like the Oil Fill Timer, 8-) :lol:, that changed within 2 weeks and for a good reason too (one that I'm sure that all of the Dealerships with their nice indoor showroom floors were overjoyed at, :lol:).

If your daughter really wants to get into the Arts, have her shoot for the Graphic Artist field. Sure computers have invaded that area as well, but it takes the human touch more to make the drawn graphics real and believable by the humans that will view and enjoy them. And there are so many different options to choose from these days and computer art for games is the major players out there today. And what's even better you can be a real Artist and not have to conform to whatever format identity that has been prescribed for your field (except when the customer dictates it...but usually they don't know what they want and ask for you to make a few samples of your idea....as though doing just one wasn't hard enough, ;) ).

Lots of luck, or you might just do the most logical thing. Become an Electro-Mechanical Engineer! That way you're in control of both the engineering side of the drawing and the CAD generated Iso as well. And should I mention that it pays really well too?

But let me impart this one piece of advice....do whatever you're good at and really love to do for the enjoyment of it, then make it your profession as well. That way it will be fun and not something you do that just to pays the bills, because when you look at everything that way, it becomes something you enjoy doing....and as i always say....Fun Never Quits!
Thanks for your insight. I'll pass it along. We just dropped her off at the University of Virginia with a full ride from the US Air Force. She has decided on Chemical engineering, but material engineering has perked her interest as well.

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