Transporting a Model T

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bdtutton
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Transporting a Model T

Post by bdtutton » Thu Apr 15, 2021 1:57 pm

I just bought a 1913 Model T and I am going to pick it up this weekend. I have a large enclosed trailer so the car will be well protected, but I want to make sure it does not move around inside the trailer. I only have hooks in the corners of the trailer so I was planning to run the straps around the axles of the car to hold it in place inside of the trailer. I have hauled tractors and other cars this way, but looking under the Model T the axles look a little skinny and fragile....but then again it does not weigh very much. Any advice or words of caution about hauling a Model T this way?

Thank you.....


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by 1923Touring » Thu Apr 15, 2021 2:19 pm

Congratulations on your acquisition. Others will have different opinions, but I prefer to tie the car down by the front and rear springs. This prevents the bending of either axles which bend easily, and it prevents the car from bouncing the whole trip.

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by KWTownsend » Thu Apr 15, 2021 2:46 pm

Do not pull front axle forward and rear axle backwards.
Pull front axle back and rear axle foreword.

Better yet, use wheel nets and pull straight down.

Keith

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by ivaldes1 » Thu Apr 15, 2021 2:50 pm

Go under the axle with your strap, then up and hook to the frame.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Bills Auto Works » Thu Apr 15, 2021 3:32 pm

Your QUALITY Model T Transporter in Business Since 1983 & Still Going Strong

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by jiminbartow » Thu Apr 15, 2021 3:50 pm

Congratulations on your purchase. Use the springs and be sure to cross the straps. Jim Patrick.

D3D75705-EE68-4A28-9458-F204EEF7D3B6.jpeg
71086457-84E2-4471-B456-016B785EF5A2.jpeg


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Allan » Fri Apr 16, 2021 1:36 am

I believe the car should be tied down. Wheel baskets do this.

Wheel baskets also allow the transported car to move on it's suspension, just like modern cars are hauled. Tying down to the frame means the car flexes on the tiedowns as the suspension works over undulating roads. You run the risk of the tiedowns disengaging as they are alternately loose and tight.

The longer the strap, and the lower the angle to the floor, the less the car is tied down. Sure, it can't go back or forward, but is free to dance about a bit.

Allan from down under.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by kmatt2 » Fri Apr 16, 2021 3:12 am

With a 1913 T and the early type above axle front wishbone I would NOT Tie to the front axle. Tie around the spring up by the frame and cross the straps. Same goes for the rear, tie around the spring up by the frame and cross the straps as shown in a prior posted rear picture.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Loftfield » Fri Apr 16, 2021 7:59 am

The 1913 has no radiator apron so you can feed a short strap (such as a two-foot strap with metal loops at both ends) through the gap between the radiator and the front cross member, wrap the short strap around the front frame cross member. Tie your front straps to the metal ends of the short strap, this will get your straps tied to the frame, the most secure member for such purposes.The front axle is tied to the T only by the wishbone ball and socket joint, far too weak a connection to handle the torque generated by a lurching automobile. Even wheel baskets or nets on the front are still reliant on the ball and socket joint of the wishbone, not good enough.

In the rear there is less of a problem. The rear wishbone connections are much stronger, were designed to handle rear-thrust torque. It is possible to wrap the tie-downs around the top of the springs, up closest to the rear frame member. Cross the tie downs left to right, right left, to handle side to side sway, and all should be well.

Just to be sure, set the parking brake, and place wheel chocks in front of the front wheels and behind the rear wheels, assuming you drove the car into the trailer front end first.

The above method gets your car secure without having to take hours to secure it in place with numerous straps to handle multi-directional torque.

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by TWrenn » Fri Apr 16, 2021 8:27 am

Post pics of your "new" car!! I love my '13, you'll love yours too. Something about
this particular model just captivates.

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Transporting a Model T

Post by FreighTer Jim » Sun Apr 18, 2021 2:23 pm

I just loaded this 1915 Model T Runabout up
in Bolton, Massachusetts.

1233D7A1-9184-413C-BA23-783DF3D5FF0B.jpeg

Going from one family member to another 😉

This trip will be unique 🤔

I have to pick up another Model T in
Michigan that is also going from one family
member to another.

Since 2006 - I have personally transported over
(400) Model T’s of just about every body style
and configuration.

1BB34114-DC3C-4699-AF7D-B4387DBE4197.jpeg

A few years ago - I standardized tie down
Methods for all Model T’s & Early Brass Cars.

If the wheels - spindles - bearings are secure
and in good order:

Mac’s axle straps thru the wheels
Ratcheting nylon straps from the wheel
Back to the center of the vehicle in line

2691954C-6170-488D-BDE9-75D438104280.jpeg

This holds the car together
This helps keep the car from “ walking “
Across the trailer floor

97560E8B-C742-4987-928B-9BAD864374D3.jpeg

I have etrac installed about every four feet
Width wise across my trailer


FJ

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by RajoRacer » Mon Apr 19, 2021 11:32 am

Wheel nets are the best option - let the original suspension operate - our country's roads are atrocious !


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by jiminbartow » Mon Apr 19, 2021 11:43 am

Do not use wheel nets as the only tie down method. Use them along with other tie down methods. I have had U-Haul wheel nets shift and come off the tires as the car shifted and moved to and fro. Luckily, my T was tied down with crossed straps attached to the springs. Do not attach straps to the axles, as the stresses encountered during hauling can damage and even bend the axles.

It does not hurt to incapacitate the suspension system of the T to prevent it from bouncing around on the trailer, as the hauling trailer, is equipped with its’ own suspension system. Jim Patrick
Last edited by jiminbartow on Mon Apr 19, 2021 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by RajoRacer » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:06 pm

I'm not referring to "U-Haul" wheel nets - I'm talking about Mac's & my custom made for 30 x 3.5 tires wheel nets. I've got thousands of miles towing with wheel nets - never had one loosen or remove itself - one needs to frequently check your lashings though !

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by BE_ZERO_BE » Mon Apr 19, 2021 1:28 pm

I had modern tire wheel nets when I first got my trailer.
I quickly replaced them with some off-the-shelf fully adjustable wheel nets.
The horizontal loop is adjustable and can reach around a T tire easily.
The top over strap is adjustable as well to keep everything snug.

I always check my tiedowns at every fuel stop.

 
OLD Wheel Nets.jpg
 OLD WHEEL NETS
NEW Whel Nets.jpg
 ADJUSTABLE WHEEL NETS
Respectfully Submitted,
Be_Zero_Be

I drive a Model T ... Microseconds don't matter :D

For every Absolute Model T Fact there are at least three exceptions.

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by KWTownsend » Mon Apr 19, 2021 2:18 pm

20190803_084217.jpg
I prefer to pull straight down on each wheel. Pulling the front axle forward can mess up your caster of your front axle.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Dan McEachern » Mon Apr 19, 2021 3:32 pm

The adjustable wheel baskets work really well, but you might find that pulling the straps on them straight down could allow the car to shift front to back slightly, so be aware of that. I prefer to have the straps at a slight angle to give some fore/aft rigidity to the holdown.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Norman Kling » Mon Apr 19, 2021 4:20 pm

Interesting, isn't it. Like water pumps and what kind of oil to use, there are many opinions. So I will give you some things NOT to do. Many of the above ideas are very good. but do NOT tie in the middle of the axle. I prefer to tie next to the spring shackle on the front wheels to the outside corners of the trailer. And from the same point to an eye on the side of the trailer near the center between the front and rear wheels. That way the axles are pulled back and forward, equalizing the pull in each direction so it doesn't pull out the wishbone socket, and will also allow the suspension of the T to operate without changing the pull on the straps. I tie the rear axle from a point close to the rear wheel also both front and backward. If you don't have an eye at the center, you could run a strap from the front axle to the opposite side of the trailer in the rear, but the rear would need to be tied to the front on the same side or the straps would slip down the axle to the center.
Now some things NOT to do. Do not tie in center of front axle. Do NOT tie in center of rear axle. Especially near the differential. Those two areas of the axles are easy to bend. I used to tie down the frame, but even though the trailer has its own suspension, I found the T bounces up and down a lot more when tied by the frame than by the axles.
Norm

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Steve Jelf » Mon Apr 19, 2021 9:10 pm

I have had U-Haul wheel nets shift and come off the tires as the car shifted and moved to and fro.
IMG_2852.JPG
That was my experience too. Every time I stopped, they were off. Fortunately I had other straps on the car.
The inevitable often happens.
1915 Runabout
1923 Touring


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by bdtutton » Tue Apr 20, 2021 11:02 am

I did not expect this many replies and opinions when I posted the original question. I am fortunate that I have a large enclosed trailer with several cross members under that very thick wooden floor. I also have a 1930 Model A that I plan to occasionally haul so I positioned the Model A in the trailer to get just the right amount of tongue weight and positioned some large D rings in just the right spot to allow me to cross strap the car down over the springs and put a small strap around the axle at the point where the spring is mounted as a backup in case the strap over the spring fails.
....
I now have the car I just purchased home and I have started working on it. Fortunately, the main problems are that the top and the tires are shot from age and setting too long, but the previous owner had planned to store it for a long time so the gas was drained, spark plugs out with oil...etc....
...
Garage2.jpg


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Erik Johnson » Tue Apr 20, 2021 11:39 am

Please note that your car is a 1914 Ford, not a 1913 as you stated in your original post.

If I recall correctly, in another thread you indicated that the car was assembled in October 1913.

Even though it was assembled in the fall of 1913, it is still a 1914 model year, 1914 being an adjective, not a date.


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bdtutton
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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by bdtutton » Tue Apr 20, 2021 4:36 pm

Erik....Yes, I am aware that it is a 1914 Body style, but it was built in October 1913 and the title says 1913. I asked my wife what year she would identify the car as and she said 1913 because that is what the title says.....and besides that, most people would not be able to tell if this car is a Ford Model T or a Model A. I have driven a 1930 Model A for years and half the people that come up to me ask if it is a Model T.
...
So...I guess that is a valid question for the people on the forum. I think I will post something and see what people say.
.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Erik Johnson » Tue Apr 20, 2021 5:02 pm

It's a 1914 Model T Ford.

In the U.S., vehicles are described by model year, not the date of manufacture.

Manufacturers determined and assign model years to the vehicles they produce, not state government agencies such as the DMV.

When you transfer the title, I suggest correcting the model year to 1914.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Scott_Conger » Tue Apr 20, 2021 5:50 pm

That is a VERY nice looking car with everything patinated similarly. I personally would need to see some very bad things going on with the top, to condemn it. Same thing with the tires.

This is my opinion and not a pro or con opinion regarding the propriety of restoration, refurbishment or refreshment: you just bought the car and are entering into an entirely new world...lots of things to learn, do, consider...once you make the (perhaps necessary) decision to put on a new top, you are going to be creating a vehicle with dramatic and obvious disparities in age and condition...this will all most invariably lead to the need for more refurbishment which will lead to more disparities. Your car, your choice...just predicting the future as it might play out and if that's your plan and have the time or money, go at it with gusto. If that's not your plan, give the disparity angle some thought.

I have 4 T's and my 1913 looks just like yours, with a very old water-stained top that looks just right with the rest of the car. Now, what I will recount is My experience is with my '15...it was bought in the late '60's from the original owner, by a young guy looking farrrrrrrr into the future to have a retirement project. At some point, he replaced the original seats with a really poorly executed interior. Later, the top was done and it is gorgeous and a quarter bounced on it would hit the ceiling...a Marine DI would approve. Fast forward to a few years ago, and his now-advanced age and health called a halt to any further debasement of a car that could have previously vied for the "Rip VanWinkle" car. And you know what? The rest of the car looks exactly like about 1919, with perfect original paint, wheels, brass...the seats look poor, the top is a prize winner, and neither look correct at all on the car...every aspect of the car begs for "restoration", which it will not get...I'd even wager that baring a rock-slide having gone through your top, it would look just great (and more fitting for the condition) on my car.

FWIW. Make haste slowly.
Scott Conger

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by bdtutton » Tue Apr 20, 2021 10:19 pm

Scott...I understand your comments about the patina, but there is a very large rip down the center of the top and the tires sat flat for so long that I would be worried about leaving the yard. The car is very dirty (Years of dirt), but the paint is shiny and almost perfect and the seats are almost perfect. The brass is covered with bubbling lacquer and tarnish, but the brass parts that I have cleaned up are almost perfect. This could be a show car if I replaced the top and tires and spent some time cleaning it up. There is a gem hidden under that coat of dirt.


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Scott_Conger » Tue Apr 20, 2021 10:40 pm

Brian

my '19 runabout was successfully sporting 1950's vintage Riversides for several years after I purchased it. I was eventually sideswiped one day while on tour and it crimped/bent the left rear clincher rim. I finished my tour...the Neon that hit me was totaled. I had to cut that tire off the rim to repair the rim...replaced the rear two tires as a pair, with modern Riversides...have now worn them out after 2 National Tours, many regional tours and several thousand miles.

The two remaining 1950's Riversides on the front are just starting to wear on the outside edge. Am I worried about leaving the yard? Maybe in another 10 - 20 years I might. I'm actually more worried about my 2nd set of new tires lasting...that's the challenge. At the rate they're wearing on our gravel roads, they will be used up yet again before my fronts give up the ghost.

Have fun with your car...it really looks like it was well built and loved. Ask lots of questions, believe 1/2 of what you're told, and make good, sound decisions and you'll do fine.
Scott Conger

Full Flow Float Valves - deliver fuel like Henry intended!


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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Playswithbrass » Wed Apr 21, 2021 8:44 am

I would try to get some idea of the roads you plan to use. Some of your Michigan roads would shake a car loose however well you had tied it down.

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Transporting a Model T

Post by FreighTer Jim » Wed Apr 21, 2021 9:00 am

Bryan 👋

I am leaving Auburn, Indiana this morning to
go pick up a Model T in Owosso, Michigan that
is headed to California with another Model T.

It looks like you live in Coloma ... 🤔

Let me know if I can help you out

FJ
260-804-6695

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Steve Jelf » Wed Apr 21, 2021 10:00 am

The discussion of tires new and old prompts me to mention Blockleys. When the time comes to replace my current Riversides I intend to give Blockleys a try. They are advertised as much higher quality than all the other current clinchers. I'll find out if that's true. They cost more than Wards, but if they last 20% longer they actually cost less.
The inevitable often happens.
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1923 Touring

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Re: Transporting a Model T

Post by Oldav8tor » Wed Apr 21, 2021 10:16 am

Bryan,
If your title says 1913, I wouldn't go to the SOS and ask that they change it. That said, Michigan usually titles a car by the Model year, not the year of manufacture. Being built in 1913 your car probably has both '13 and '14 parts --- as time passes you will become more educated as to the unique features of your Model T. If the engine is original to your car, you can find the block casting date on the side and one of us can look up the engine serial number and give you a build date if you don't have it.

My Model T is a 1917 model, built on Sept 23, 1916. It has a number of '16 parts but is definitely a 1917. When people ask "How old is it?" I reply "A 1917 Model year, built in September 1916." My car was actually built on my dad's tenth birthday which makes it special to me.
1917 Touring
1946 Aeronca Champ
1952 Willys M38a1 Jeep
1953 Ford Jubilee Tractor

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