Radiator Question

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Mopar_man
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Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Fri May 22, 2020 10:54 pm

So the radiator that came with my 26 Touring was full of antifreeze and had no leaks that I could see it was not running. It did have a water pump on it as well. I'm going to get rid of the water pump and was wondering how I could tell if the radiator was partially clogged. I plan on running water through it but is there a way to tell if the water is going through the whole thing or just part?

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Steve Jelf
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Steve Jelf » Fri May 22, 2020 11:21 pm

...is there a way to tell if the water is going through the whole thing or just part?

Don't think so. Give it a good vinegar soak and thorough flush and see what happens. If it overheats I wouldn't waste time trying to fix it. That's when it's time to bite the financial bullet and buy a new Berg's.

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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Chris Paulsen » Fri May 22, 2020 11:47 pm

If the radiator is on the car, start it up and let it get warm. An infared thermometer will tell you if you've got hot spots and cold spots. That will typically indicate plugged up areas.

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John Warren
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by John Warren » Sat May 23, 2020 8:39 am

Agree with Steve, and Berg's is the best replacement.
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Sat May 23, 2020 9:15 am

Thanks for the input. It's off the car so I think I'll fill it with some vinegar let it sit and then run water through it. When I get the car running I'll hit it with my temperature reader.


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by John kuehn » Sat May 23, 2020 9:19 am

Water pumps on a T means somebody was having cooling issues. Looks like the issue is the radiator. They do eventually wear out. Beware if it still ‘looks’ good. Looks isn’t what makes them cool.


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Norman Kling » Sat May 23, 2020 9:33 am

There are three things which can cause a radiator to be bad. The most obvious one is a leak. Second would be a clog. But the third one is less obvious and most old radiators have this third one. That is the cross fins have been corroded where they attach to the water tubes. That junction is what conducts the heat from the tubes to the fins which catch the air and cool the entire radiator. So, examine the core well.
After you clean the radiator with vinegar, turn it upside down and force water at pressure through the bottom hose connection so that it will come out the top, which is upside down.
Then install the radiator. fill it with plain water and drive it around a while. If the engine has been rebuilt, just drive short distances at moderate speed until it is broken in. It might run a bit warm with a rebuilt engine until it breaks in even with a new radiator, that is the reason for slower speeds and short distances for a while.
If you notice no leaks and the engine runs without steaming and boiling, you can drain and install the anti-freeze. If you continually overheat, you most likely need a new radiator.
Norm

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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Sat May 23, 2020 4:28 pm

That was my first thought when I saw the water pump. Today I ran water through it and it came out clean. No dirt not rust nothing. The fins don't seem to have any corrosion and as I try to move them on the tubes they don't seem to move. I think once I get the car running that will tell me for sure. There also seems to be a metal plate in the top tank that is loose. Looks like it goes the whole length of the core.


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Norman Kling » Sat May 23, 2020 4:36 pm

That baffle at the top could be the cause of overheating if it is loose. Normally it is about halfway between the filler neck and the top of the core. It helps keep the water from splashing out as the car runs. It can also be the cause of overheating if you pour some water into the radiator and it gets that plate wet and you look down and think the radiator is full. So when you check the water level, be sure to rock the car to see if it is water or just a wet baffle that you see. Especially when filling inside a garage which is not very well lit.
I would suggest that if that baffle is loose, you take it to a radiator shop to have it soldered into place. That in itself would save you the cost of a new radiator and eliminate the need for a water pump.
Norm

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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mark Nunn » Sat May 23, 2020 5:32 pm

If you use vinegar, I found concentrated, 30% vs. standard 5%, at Home Depot. It's in their cleaning section.


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Scott_Conger » Sat May 23, 2020 5:45 pm

With 30% vinager, use eye and skin protection and be quite careful about breathing fumes.
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by DHort » Sat May 23, 2020 10:25 pm

Scott is correct. Vinegar is acetic acid 5 percent. The 30 percent will be a lot tougher on your skin n lungs.

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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Sat May 23, 2020 10:38 pm

Would they open up the tank and then solder it closed again? How can the water splash out if the cap is on?


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Scott_Conger » Sat May 23, 2020 10:56 pm

Robert

when thermosyphoning, the water can really spout out the top hose. Without a baffle, the water will more readily find the overflow tube and slowly and unnecessarily dump water out of the radiator via that tube. Additionally, without a rubber gasket, a surprising amount of water can spritz out past the cap threads. With a brass radiator and coolant, that means a nearly permanently stained pretty radiatior. Not so much with a black painted one.
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Mopar_man
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Sat May 23, 2020 10:59 pm

Thanks Scott! Now I understand. Kinda like perking coffee. I do have the rubber gasket.


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Re: Radiator Question

Post by OilyBill » Sun May 24, 2020 12:06 am

You may also want to try a product known as "CLR" which removes rust and also mineral scale such as calcium buildup.
But Vinegar is a lot cheaper. If your radiator is flowing clear, with no signs of rust, then the vinegar will probably be the best.

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Mopar_man
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Re: Radiator Question

Post by Mopar_man » Sun May 24, 2020 2:26 pm

Thanks!! We will see how this goes I've used CLR in the past. That works great.

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