Looking over the windshield

Discuss all things Model T related.
Forum rules
If you need help logging in, or have question about how something works, use the Support forum located here Support Forum
Complete set of Forum Rules Forum Rules

Topic author
Mark Osterman
Posts: 352
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:18 pm
First Name: Mark
Last Name: Osterman
Location: Rochester, NY

Looking over the windshield

Post by Mark Osterman » Fri Sep 13, 2019 7:44 pm

I’m six foot one inches tall. When I driving my ‘23 runabout I have to be sure that I can see the traffic light by either looking under my windshield frame ... or over it. So often it’s right where I can’t see it. It’s a strange dance I do as I approach the light to make sure I don’t go through when it’s too late. I’ve yet to restore the top on my car, but I’m getting closer and realizing how difficult it will be for me to see the traffic lights once the top is installed. Do others use shorter springs and padding in their front seats ... hunker down to look under the windshield ... or use one of those traffic light finder prisms?

User avatar

cudaman
Posts: 302
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2019 4:17 pm
First Name: Mark
Last Name: Strange
Location: Hillsboro, MO
MTFCA Number: 30944
MTFCI Number: 23667

Re: Looking over the windshield

Post by cudaman » Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:12 pm

The vendors sell a suction cup mounted fresnel lens, but I couldn't get it to stay stuck.

https://www.modeltford.com/item/A-TLF.aspx



Now I use this, it sticks to the inside of the windshield using only water (no glue):

https://lightinsight.com/

I have one on my Model T and my daily driver Honda Element. Works great! :)
Mark Strange
Hillsboro, MO
1924 Cut-off Touring (now a pickup)


Erik Johnson
Posts: 100
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:25 pm
First Name: Erik
Last Name: Johnson
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Re: Looking over the windshield

Post by Erik Johnson » Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:51 pm

When I drive a Model T, I watch the stop light cycle in the distance (two or three blocks in advance on straight streets and roads) so I can avoid a fresh red light/panic stop at the intersection.

By paying attention to the timing of the lights, I can adjust my speed as needed. When approaching the intersection in an antique car, the goal is to have a fresh green light. Knowing if the green is fresh means I don't have to worry about a light change and a panic stop when I approach the intersection.
Attachments
Cruising in 1917 Model T.JPG


Topic author
Mark Osterman
Posts: 352
Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:18 pm
First Name: Mark
Last Name: Osterman
Location: Rochester, NY

Re: Looking over the windshield

Post by Mark Osterman » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:14 pm

I drive in the city of Rochester, NY every day. Sometimes it’s neighborhoods which is not bad but often it’s aggressive city traffic. You can’t hold back in the street in traffic ... you have to go with the flow. On occasion some lights have a count down but not all of them. Nevertheless ... the windshield frame sets right in my line of view as I sit comfortably in the seat. And so, as I’m halfway in the block I can’t see the light unless I either sit up higher or tip my head down.


Bill Crosby
Posts: 69
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:33 pm
First Name: Bill
Last Name: Crosby
Location: Webster, NY
Board Member Since: 2016

Re: Looking over the windshield

Post by Bill Crosby » Fri Sep 13, 2019 10:23 pm

Mark, My other car Is a Mini Cooper and if I pull up to the white line at the intersection I can,t see the stop/go light most of the time, so I use a Traffic Light finder with great success, try one they are cheep and work well. With your top up It will serve you well.

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic